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No. 17 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT 



OP 



PUBLIC WELFAk 



YEAR ENDINQ K ovEJ BER 30, 1939 
P%S. I, B, AND m 




' Document Approved by the Commission on Atv*"" 



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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Arthur G. Rotch, Commissioner 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives : 

The Twentieth Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare, covering 
the year from December 1, 1938, to November 30, 1939, is herewith respectfully 
presented. 

Members of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare 



Date of Original 
Appointment 


Name 


Residence 


Date of 
Expiration 


Dec. 1, 1935 
Dec. 1, 1936 
Dec. 1, 1938 
Nov. 8, 1939 
Nov. -1, 1939 
Nov. 1, 1939 


Mary T. Roberts 
Frederick P. Schmid . 
Marjorie R. Stoneman 
Frank A. Bayrd . 
David W. Armstrong 
Ripley Dana 


Chestnut Hill . 
Boston . 
Brookline . 
Maiden 
Worcester . 
Newton 


Dec. 1, 1941 
Dec. 1, 1939 
Dec. 1, 1941 
Dec. 1, 1939 
Dec. 1, 1940 
Dec. 1, 1940 



Divisions of the Department of Public Welfare 

Boston 

Division of Aid and Relief : Room 30, State House 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor of Social Service 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Aid to Dependent Children 

Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor of Settlements 

Supervisor of Relief 

John J. Donnelly, Supervisor of Welfare Statistics, 15 Ashburton Place 

Clarence A. Bingham, Supervisor of Fiscal Management 
Bureau of Old Age Assistance: 15 Ashburton Place 

Louis R. Lipp, Assistant Superintendent 
Division of Child Guardianship: Room 43, State House 

Miss Marion A. Joyce, Director 
Division of Juvenile Training : 41 Mt. Vernon Street 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 

Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 
*Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent, Girls' Parole Branch 

C. Frederick Gilmore, Superintendent, Boys' Parole Branch 
Subdivision of Private Incorporated Charities: 15 Ashburton Place 

Miss Florence G. Dickson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Miss Alice M. Mclntire, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Miss Mary C. Robinson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Subdivision of Crippled Children : Room 549, State House 

Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 

Institutions under the Supervision of the 
Department of Public Welfare 

Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary, Tewksbury. Lawrence K. Kelly, 

M.D., Superintendent ' ^ ■ 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton, John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. George P. Campbell superintendent < 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superin- 
tendent 

State Board of Housing : 20 Somerset Street 
John Carroll, Chairman 

* Retired Feb. 24, 1939. 



P.D. 1 
PART I 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

The Department oi Public Welfare experienced rather an unusual situation in 

that during the course of the year there were three commissioners in office. Mr. 

Id W, Armstrong succeeded Mr. Walter V. McCarthy on April 5, 1939 and 

(.1 as commissioner until Octoher 11, 1940 when the present commissioner! 

office There is therefore heing submitted as a part of the annual report 

Mr. Armstrong's report to the Governor describing the work done during his' 

term of office. 

Since the present commissioner took office, he has been carrying out the poli- 
and the reorganization of public welfare in this Commonwealth initiated by 
Mr. Armstrong. Until the end of the year there were very few changes in per- 
sonnel because the various examinations had not been completed, and the present 
commissioner has been particularly concerned with the new laws enacted by the 
last Congress amending the Social Security Act, and the rules and regulations 
pertaining to those laws established by the Social Security Board. These have 
referred particularly to the establishment of a merit system which, under the 
amendment enacted by Congress, would become effective on January 1, 1940. 

The Department of Public Welfare appreciates the assistance which has been 
given by the several advisory committees of the Massachusetts Relief Officers 
Association, the Western Massachusetts Public Welfare Association, and the 
Massachusetts Selectmen's Association. The department also appreciates the 
advice and help given by various persons qualified to give advice in regard to 
setting up qualifications for the new positions in the department. 

The department also wishes to pay tribute to the fine spirit shown by officials 
in the local boards of public welfare in connection with the reorganization plans 
for public welfare in the Commonwealth. 

October 4, 1939 

The Honorable Leverett Saltonstall 
Governor., Massachusetts 

My dear Governor : 

On April 5 last, I took office as Commissioner of Public Welfare under your 
appointment, and with instructions to reorganize the Department with particular 
reference to the Division of Aid and Relief. 

My leave of absence from my Worcester work has expired and I have sub- 
mitted my resignation. 

I make the following report. 

1. The Division of Aid and Relief has been changed from a partly super- 
visory and partly case investigating organization to a completely supervis- ! 
ory one, which, in addition, is giving a leadership, guidance, and informa- 
tional service. 

The administration of relief, including case investigations, has been turned 
back to boards of public welfare and old age assistance boards throughout 
the state, as a local function. 

The Division was attempting the impossible job of direct supervision of 
•n hundred relief cases per State Visitor, and of investigating forty 
thousand new cases every year. Its visitors were duplicating the investiga- 
tions and re-investigations made by the social workers of local boards of 
ic welfare, and in many cases they made original investigations. There 
a duplication of responsibility. The officials and the visitors of the Di- 
al had no time for much leadership and guidance in the improvement of 
local relief administration. 

pidly as possible, the State Department is withdrawing completely 
tro: investigating and personal contacts with relief recipients. Local 



1. 1. 



boards of public welfare and old age assistance boards are expected to make 
adequate investigations, keep proper records, and administer relief in ac- 
cordance with policies and procedures established by the Department. 

The State Department is basing its decisions as to reimbursement to local 
welfare boards out of state funds, and its approval of Federal grants, on 
minimum information in each case obtained by local boards and verified by 
appropriate evidence. 

All new cases must be approved for state reimbursement and Federal 
grants by a visitor of the State Department. His approval will include eli- 
gibility, need, and the amount of assistance allowed. 

The Department however will make no attempt to impose a state standard 
of relief on cities and towns. It will approve allowances when not exces- 
sive. 

Old and continuing cases will be reviewed as rapidly as possible. State 
Department visitors have the authority to discontinue approval in state re- 
imbursement and Federal grants when relief is no longer needed, or when 
the allowance is excessive. 

On the basis of this review process, the State Visitor will advise local 
welfare and old age assistance boards as to policies and procedures. Visitors 
will also make reports to the supervisors of the Division concerning the op- 
eration of local boards. We believe that it is no longer necessary for towns 
and cities to employ outside experts to make studies of the operations of 
welfare boards. 

While the Department's supervisory powers extend only to unsettled gen- 
eral relief cases, and old age assistance, and aid to dependent children cases, 
its leadership and guidance to local boards of public welfare will be extended 
in entirely local cases to the degree that local boards desire it. 

2. The Division of Aid and Relief has been completely reorganized to pro- 
vide one generalized supervision and service to local welfare and old age 
assistance boards. 

The Division, heretofore, was organized into three subdivisions, each 
dealing separately with a single category of relief. State Visitors of all 
three visited each local board. They even duplicated each other's investiga- 
tions in one family. There was much duplication of time, of travel and 
expense. Conflicting information and advice was given to local officials. 
These subdivisions have been abolished. 

Now only one visitor of the Division is responsible for giving advice and 
information to each welfare and old age assistance board. Each visitor is 
supervising the administration of relief in all three categories: general re- 
lief, old age assistance, and aid to dependent children cases. 

The efficiency of the Division has been increased, the waste of time and 
money has been eliminated, and a better service is being given to local 
officials. 

3. Seven supervisory districts have been established after a painstaking 
study of case loads and other factors. There is a staff of visitors in each 
District under the direction of a District Supervisor. 

District offices have been opened in Springfield, Worcester, Lawrence, 
Medford, Brockton, New Bedford, and Boston. 

Hitherto the supervision of the visitors of the Division was unsatisfactory 
because it was remote and also because there were too few supervisors. 

Now there is a close and almost daily contact between District Super- 
visors and visitors. A system of daily reports has been established. Periodic 
conferences of the whole staff in each district are held for the discussion of 
problems and for the promotion of uniform policies and procedures. 

The establishment of the Districts under supervisors has added immeasur- 
ably to the efficiency of the Division. The Supervisors are gaining an inti- 
mate knowledge of their districts through the reports of the visitors and 
their own contacts with local officials. Frequent conferences of these Dis- 
trict Supervisors with officials of the Division and the Commissioner pro- 



P.D. 17 

mote the application of uniform policies and procedures throughout the state 
in the administration of relief. 

A substantia] sum will be saved in travel expense because visitors no 
longer must go to Boston to report or to consult their supervisors. 

Establishment of the district offices should prove of great value to local 
welfare and old age assistance boards. These officials no longer must travel 
to the State Mouse to obtain authoritative information and advice from an 
official oi the Division. It is now at hand in the District Office. 

Besides tie District Supervisor, there is a Settlement Agent, and an Ac- 
counting and Statistical Agent in each District Office. Any information or 
advice that is not readily available through the visitors may be obtained 
from them. v 

4. An appeal organization has been established under a Supervisor of 
Appeals. This has been done under authority of legislation passed by the 
( General Court abolishing appeal boards in old age assistance and aid to de- 
pendent children cases, and substituting therefor a provision that the Com- 
missioner may designate referees to investigate appeal cases, to hold hear- 
ings, and to render decisions which, when approved by the Commissioner, 
are final and binding upon local welfare and old age assistance boards. 

Through this system there can be prompt attention to appeal cases, and it 
is possible to hold hearings in the various towns and cities so that applicants 
and welfare officials do not have to take the time or bear the expense of 
traveling very far. 

Uniformity in decisions will be achieved by constant review of referees' 
decisions by the Supervisor of Appeals and the Commissioner, and through 
conferences of the referees. 

Decisions will be reported to District Supervisors and visitors so that 
they may advise local officials to prevent the necessity of appeals. 

5. The Supervisors and visitors have been carefully trained in their jobs 
through a Training Institute conducted for two weeks. This was necessary 
because of the changed function of the Division, and because those who had 
been operating only in one category of relief had to be trained as to the 
laws, policies, and procedures relating to the other two categories. 

The papers which were given in the Institute have been assembled in a 
mimeographed volume and distributed to Supervisors and Visitors of the 
Department, and to local welfare officials. It constitutes one of the best 
sources of information on relief administration that has been issued any- 
where. 

The training process is being continued, and plans have been made for 
the inclusion of local officials in future institutes and conferences. 

6. A Manual of Laws, Rules, Policies, Procedures, and Methods has been 
prepared for the use of personnel of the Department and of local welfare 
boards. It differs from the assembled material used in the Training Insti 
tute because it is the official manual of this Department. It will be very 
valuable as a source of ready reference for almost any information which 
may be required. 

It has been prepared in loose leaf form so that changes may be easily 
made and additional information inserted. It will be supplemented by 
periodic bulletins. 

7. Xew record and report forms have been developed which will be suppliec 
to local welfare and* old age assistance boards. These will facilitate giving 
the information reciuired by the Department. They are also part of the 
plan to establish uniform procedures in the administration of relief through- 
out the state. 

8. A family relief budget has been developed and it appears in the Manual 
It is not intended that this shall be a standard of relief that is to be imposec 
on the local welfare boards. It is, however, intended as a guide to the visi- 

of this Department in considering cases in which reimbursement is re- 
quested and in which the Federal government participates through ifc 



1 ?t. I. 



grants. It is also intended as a guide to local welfare boards to the extent 
that they wish to use it. 

We further hope that this budget may be used as a guide by local welfare 
boards in establishing their own budgets based upon their own relief poli- 
cies and resources and in accordance with local conditions. We in the State 
Department believe that these local budgets should be established because 
administration of relief on a definite budgetary standard is the only way in 
which need can be determined without discrimination. 

9. The establishment of uniform policies and procedures in the administra- 
tion of relief throughout the state is very much needed. Many have been 
developed and are incorporated in the Manual. The Training Institute, the 
Manual, the new forms, the budget, and the conferences of the Visitors, 
District Supervisors, officials of the Division, with the Commissioner are all 
part of a plan to institute uniform policies and procedures. 

The District Supervisors, Visitors, and Referees know exactly what poli- 
cies and procedures they are to operate under and their leadership and guid- 
ance to local welfare and' old age assistance boards is an important part of 
the plan for uniformity. 

It is hoped that conferences may be held to be participated in by officials 
and Visitors of the Division, and by local welfare officials for the promotion 
of uniform policies and procedures. 

10. The State Department has worked with the Civil Service Commission 
to bring more uniformity in qualifications for like positions in public wel- 
fare work. This is in line with the recent amendment to the Social Security 
Act giving the Social Security Board, beginning January 1, 1940, the au- 
thority to require that state public assistance plans "provide such methods 
of administration including methods relating to the establishment and main- 
tenance of personnel standards on a merit basis as are found by the Board 
to be necessary for the proper and efficient operation of the plan." 

11. Duties and qualifications for certain technical positions in the Depart- 
ment have been set up. Examinations for these positions have been held up, 
however, because of the pressure of the work of reorganization, and of the 
desirability of getting the reorganization under way before these positions 
are established. They should be established soon, however, because they 
will be of immense value to local welfare boards in developing policies and 
procedures which will insure better care for the needy, and a saving of 
money in many places. 

12. A system for better inspection and supervision and records concerning 
infirmaries, lodging houses, and boarding homes for the aged has been 
devised. 

13. The two statistical divisions hitherto in this Department have been com- 
bined into one Research and Statistical Bureau to do all of the statistical 
and research work for the entire department, and to gather and tabulate the 
information from local welfare boards that is needed by the Department for 
its own studies of relief trends, and which are required by the Social Se- 
curity Board. "The Annual Report of Poor Persons Aided" which has been 
made at the cost of considerable time and expense by local welfare boards, 
and which is of little value in its present form has been eliminated, and the 
information will be gathered with less expenditure of time and money. 

14. Plans have been made for combining the three accounting divisions of 
the Department into one Bureau of Accounts. This will increase efficiency. 
In making plans for this Bureau, we have also planned for audits of pay- 
ments made by local boards in old age assistance and aid to dependent 
children cases in accordance with decisions reached in conferences with rep- 
resentatives of the Social Security Board. 

Plans also have been made to eventually make local audits of payments 
made in unsettled general relief cases, so that the great task of local boards 
in submitting annual bills in each case may be done away with. 

The combining of accounting divisions will go into effect when additional 
space for the Department is provided. 



P.D. 17 

15. The Department lias been badly cramped for room, and its offices are 
scattered throughout the basement and the sub-basement of the annex of the 
Stale Mouse and in adjacent office buildings. Some of the offices are en- 
tirely too crowded for efficient operation. The Department has been allo- 
cated the -pace in the basement of the annex which will soon be vacated by 
the State Planning Board, and plans have been made to relieve some of the 
congestion which now exists. 

16. A svstem of Daily Reports has been established for all field workers of 
the Department who are directly under the control of the Commissioner. 
These include a report of the visits made, the time of arrival at each place, 
the purpose and results of the visits, together with a parallel statement of] 
the expenses incurred. These enable the Supervisors to keep in close touch 
with the activities of the field workers and their problems, and makes a close 
check on expenses possible. 

17. In line with good office practice, a system of accounting for the time of 
office workers has been instituted. 

18. A system of control of the use of telephones has been installed which has 
materially reduced the telephone expenses of this Department. 

19. The organizational structure of the Department has been rearranged for 
better direction and supervision. 

20. For several years there have been two classifications of social worker 
in the Division of Aid and Relief — Junior Social Worker, and Senior Social 
Worker — both doing exactly the same work but receiving different compen- 
sation. This distinction has been abolished. Local boards of public welfare 
are now being advised and guided by full fledged social workers ; the pres- 
tige of the full social worker title makes a difference in their relationships 
with local officials. 

21. We have been concerned with relief policies for the guidance of Super- 
visors and Visitors of the Department, and of local officials. Many have 
been established and are stated in the Manual. The more important general 
ones are : 

All relief allowances in any category shall be based on need. 
Relief shall be administered without discrimination of any kind. 
The measure of relief in state unsettled cases shall be the local measure of 
relief. This does not mean that we expect to impose a state standard ofj 
relief on local administrations, but there is no reason why the state un- 
settled cases should get relief on a different standard than that of the case: 
having a legal settlement in a city or town. 

There shall be a careful and searching inquiry into the income and re- 
sources of applicants for relief in any category. 

The ability of sons and daughters to support applicants, especially in old 
age assistance cases, shall be carefully inquired into. We believe that, 
sons and daughters who are able to support their parents shall do so, even 
if it means sacrifice of luxuries. 

We believe that adequate assistance should be given to the needy, but we 
do not believe that the possession and operation of automobiles is neces- 
sary to relief applicants other than in exceptional circumstances. 

We have considered the great variance in relief allowances throughout 
the state. This variance is especially marked in general relief cases in 
which neither the state nor the Federal government participate financially. 
It is due primarily to the variance in resources among the towns and cities 
and it is probable that little approach to uniformity can be made without 
further financial participation of the state government in relief including 
the general relief category. 

These are the accomplishments of the entire staff of the Division. Frank 
W . Goodhue, Director of the Division of Aid and Relief, is an efficient and 
devoted servant of the state. His knowledge, experience, and judgment 
have been invaluable in the reorganization. 



I. 7 

The other officials and supervisors of the Division have had an important 
part in the tremendous detail involved in the planning. 

Every social worker in the Division was invited early in my administra- 
tion to make suggestions. Most of them did, and they were valuable sug- 
gestions. Thus they had a part in the reorganization. 

The personnel of the Division in general constitutes an efficient, devoted, 
and loyal organization. Certainly their morale is very high, and they are 
working under the new plan with interest and enthusiasm. 

We have had the whole-hearted cooperation of the Relief Officers and of 
the Selectmen's Associations of the state. Each of them at my request ap- 
pointed an advisory committee to -me in the planning. They gave valuable 
assistance. 

At every step, local welfare officials have been informed of the plans and 
their suggestions and criticisms were invited. I have met with them in sev- 
eral meetings to explain the plans, and there is a general acceptance of them. 

We have had the advice and assistance of leading executives in welfare 
work. 

We have kept in close touch with representatives of the Social Security 
Board so that we might have the benefit of their experience so that our plans 
would be in conformity with the Board's requirements. 

I have given considerable thought to the Division of Child Guardianship 
although there has not been time to do anything about reorganization. 

The Division carries on a variety of services for children, including the 
supervision of boarding homes for infants and maternity hospitals, investi- 
gation of adoptions, a social service for crippled children, and the operation 
of the Federal Child Welfare Services program. Its most important service 
is the care of approximately eighty-one hundred children who have been 
placed in its custody. It must find suitable homes for the children com- 
mitted to its care, and must give careful supervision to those in its custody 
to see that their health is safeguarded and that their training is such that 
they may become men and women of good character. 

The Division has a capable 'Director in Miss Marion A. Joyce, whom I 
had the pleasure of appointing. She is doing an excellent job. In general, 
the social workers of the Division are an efficient, devoted group of people 
doing an extremely difficult piece of work under great handicaps. 

However, I believe its efficiency can be increased and I recommend that a 
study of the Division be made by an expert in child welfare work and social 
work organization. Miss Joyce and her staff have not the time for the 
study that is needed in addition to their regular duties. Consideration 
should be given to the desirability of establishing district offices as in the 
Division of Aid and Relief for increasing the efficiency of the Division and 
for reducing travel expense. I have the following definite recommendations 
to make, based on my study of this division. 

1. An Assistant Director should be appointed. There is provision for this 
position in the law, but for some obscure reason the position has been 
vacant since Miss Winifred A. Keneran was promoted from Assistant 
Director to Director several years ago. The work of the Division has 
grown a great deal since there was an assistant, and the efficient admin- 
istration of the Division is too much for one person. 

2. The six persons who have been acting as Supervisors for many years 
should be given the classification and salary. Only one person in the 
Division has the title and salary of Supervisor and his work is no more 
important than that of the six that haven't the title and salary. 

3. Additional Supervisors should be provided for. The supervision of the 
care of eighty-one hundred children rests upon only four people. 

4. There should be an increase in the number of social workers. Each 
social worker in that subdivision which has the care and custody of 
children has an average of one hundred and forty children under care. 
This is too many for the proper care and protection of the children. 



8 P.D. 17 

5. A nurse should be provided to receive new children, and to help the 
physician examine them. 

6. The physician who examines the children should be given the title of 
Physician in the Department. Her title now is Head Social Worker. 

7. Provision should be made for a sufficient number of stenographers and 
clerical workers to eliminate the necessity of the social workers' spend- 
ing their more valuable time in doing clerical work. 

The Division of Aid and Relief which has been my major concern has been 
geared up for one primary purpose; that is, to be of the greatest possible 
service to local welfare and old age assistance boards. The withdrawal of 
the State Department from local administration of relief establishes the ad- 
ministration of relief very definitely as a function of local boards of public 
welfare and old age assistance boards, as it was intended to be, and it will 
allow the State Department to enormously increase its efficiency in a super- 
visory, leadership, guidance, and informational capacity. 
The State Department, local boards of public welfare, and old assistance 
boards are partners in the business of relief. They are now working to- 
gether in mutual confidence and cooperation. Together they can bring 
about a relief administration in this State that will be second to none, and 
we shall be able to provide for the needy in a humane way, and with effi- 
ciency and economy in the use of funds which are provided. 
Respectfully submitted, 

David W. Armstrong, 

Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

Duties of the Department of Public Welfare 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties : 

1. Supervision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 

by cities and towns. 

3. Supervision of aid to dependent children rendered by cities and towns. 

4. Supervision of old age assistance rendered by cities and towns. 

5. Visitation of boards and inspection of financial accounts of cities and towns 

with respect to old age assistance and aid to dependent children in con- 
formity with the requirements of the Social Security Act. 

6. Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children com- 

ing into the custody of the Department through court commitment or 
otherwise. 

7. Institutional custody and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 

courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children 
in families when on parole. 

8. General supervision of the work of the city and town planning boards. 

9. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies ; inves- 

tigation of petitions for the incorporation of private charities ; and the re- 
quirement and reception of annual returns from domestic and foreign 
charitable trusts and from foreign charitable corporations. 
Among the other supervisory and inspectional duties of the Department may 
be mentioned the following : 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and town infirmaries. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the four county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 

several cities and towns. 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in families, 

other than their own, by cities and towns. 



Pt. I. 9 

5. Reception and classification o£ the annual returns of cities and towns relative 

to poor persons supported and relieved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly state charges, who have 

been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, and of sane in- 
mates of state institutions. 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 

where they belong. 

9. Investigation of petitions for adoption of children under fourteen years. 

10. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the licensing of infant boarding 
houses. 

11. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

12. Licensing boarding homes for the aged. 

13. Supervision of annual census of physically handicapped children and social 
service for physically handicapped children, especially for those unable to 
attend school. 

14. Investigation of housing conditions, promotion of housing projects and sup- 
ervision of housing corporations by the State Board of Housing. 

Arthur G. Rotch, 
Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director 

The Division of Aid and Relief from December 1, 1938 to July 31, 1939 in- 
cluded six subdivisions : Subdivision of Settlements, Subdivision of Relief, Sub- 
division of Aid to Dependent Children, .Subdivision of Social Service, Bureau of 
Old Age Assistance, and Subdivision of Research and Statistics. 

On August 1, 1939 a reorganization was effected whereby the Subdivisions of 
Relief, Aid to Dependent Children, and Bureau of Old Age Assistance were con- 
solidated into a Subdivision of Supervisory Service. Seven district offices were 
established in Springfield, Worcester, Lawrence, Medford, Brockton, New Bed- 
ford and Boston, which are under the immediate supervision of a Chief District 
S Supervisor. 

The reports for the year are submitted on the basis ofc the subdivisions as they 
were functioning prior to the reorganization. 

Subdivision of Settlements 

Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor 

The Subdivision of Settlements investigates the settlements of patients admit- 

t ted to the State Infirmary, State Farm (infirmary department), state sanatoria, 

and the Massachusetts Hospital School, and generally supervises the settlement 

work of the division. There was no person remaining in the infirmary depart- 

i ment of the State Farm on November 30, 1939. 

The facilities of the infirmary department are no longer available for the.ad- 
i mission of dependent persons from cities and towns. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the 
i examination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the state institutions : 



Institutions 
State Infirmary- 
State Farm .... 
Lakeville State Sanatorium . 
No. Reading State Sanatorium 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
Westfield State Sanatorium . 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


Examina- 
tions 
3,032 
10 
242 
166 
191 
118 
11 


Orders 

Issued 

736 

10 

219 

145 

115 

111 

13 


Settle- 
ments 
Found 
472 
6 
194 
137 
94 
109 
16 


No 
Settle- 
ment 
262 
8 
37 
41 
111 
17 
6 


Orders 
With- 
drawn 
46 

2 











48 

649 
440 


Total 

Cases 

Returned 

780 

16 
231 
178 
205 
126 

22 


Totals 

Cases pending Novei 
Cases pending Novei 


3,770 

nber 30, 1938 
nber 30, 1939 


1,349 


1,028 


482 


1,558 



10 P.D. 17 

Subdivision of Relief 

The Subdivision of Relief supervises public relief rendered by boards of public 
welfare and boards of health to persons, in their own homes and in hospitals, 
who have no settlement. 

The subdivision also investigates, upon the request of the Division of Voca- 
tional Education, the circumstances of persons receiving vocational training, 
who apply for aid during rehabilitation. 

Temporary Aid (General Laws, Ch. 117, Sect. 18). — Cities and towns are 
authorized by statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor persons having no 
lawful settlements, if so ordered by the Department of Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1938, there were 25,596 continued cases including 89,586 
persons, and during the year 29,510 notices were received from 308 cities and 
towns concerning 103,285 persons. 

Causes of Aid 

1937 1938 1939 

Illness 1,403 1,112 1,097 

Desertion 252 233 201 

Widowhood 275 342 341 

Old Age 162 145 139 

Unemployment 25,411 29,162 24,658 

Insufficient income . . . . . . 2,564 2,858 2,910 

Husband in correctional institution ... 98 97 79 

Orphans 13 14 11 

Insanity 19 13 15 

Blindness 6 3 7 

Non-support 75 80 52 

Totals 30,278 34,059 29,510 

The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts 
reimbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated : 

Number Number of 

of Persons in Amounts 

Cases Families Reimbursed 

}9J2 2,847 12,339 $48,192 85 

\l\] 3,131 13,434 63,203 05 

J914 4,848 20,714 108,337 29 

\l\\ • • 7,305 32,056 178,762 28 

S|6 5,165 21,043 159,205 53 

\l\l • • • • 5,664 22,258 227,831 59 

\l\l ' • • , 4,358 17,701 261,217 44 

J919 3,756 15,668 311,148 30 

1920 3,223 13,313 334,565 05 

1921 • 8,093 32,372 635,585 63 

922 6,472 29,124 586,296 43 

}lil 4,320 19,370 432,334 70 

]%£ 5,765 27,279 642,439 34 

\ 9 Q f, 6,182 28,429 661,219 39 

1097 rr ' • i 1 T - v,„x 5 ' 584 25 - 720 622,301 80 

till 98 Ja ?T Ua i ry i 1 }° ^ Une , 3 S 4 >H 8 18,611 398 301 80 

Q?«1q rf I y \° l Une ™ 6 ' 406 30 ' 428 888 >45 85 

SHn n 7 I J° T" ne ?S 7 ' 099 27 '1 26 1,006 895 72 

§§3? Tn v } ° | Une \n\ 8 ' 639 35 ' 481 1,183672 28 

mlv Tn v ! I T UnC S 16 ' 352 69 > 496 2 136 714 92 

iwl? t" Y I l Une ™ 27 > 465 n 6>726 3,329 391 66 

9^*14 Tn v 1 t T Une In •••••• • 45,368 183,740 4 760 955 68 

iy.U-J4 (July 1 to June 30) 51494 205 Q7fi /n^7«^ m 

l935'36 Ifcl; 1 ? T UnC $ : «>l* ^ ffi; 4° 

936 _ 37 u v 1 to fe! S 64 ' 519 258 ' 076 4 272 8 ?9 11 

\1\Ar Tnlv 1 n \ ne 5S 58 ' 463 233 ' 852 3 513 661 10 

L to June 30) 5 S)568 m 488 4 395 898 31 



1938-39 (July 1 to June 30) 



56,406 197,421 



Chapter 121, section 42, of the General Laws (Ter. Ed.) provides that claims 
against the Commonwealth shall be rendered to the department on or before the 
first day of October annually and shall be for the twelve months, ending on the 
thirtieth day of June preceding. 

Shipwrecked Seamen (General Laws, ch. 102, sect. 5).— During the year no 
notices were received. 

Sick State Poor (General Laws, ch. 122, sects. 17, 18).— The sick law pro- 
vides that no persons shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be 
endangered by removal. 



PL I. 11 



Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal 
settlement who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospi- 
tals, infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such per- 
sons are not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when ap- 
plying for assistance. 

On December 1, 1938, there were 373 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from 251 cities and towns concerning 14,434 persons repre- 
sented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (General Laws, ch. Ill, sect. 116) — The law provides 
that a board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the board of public 
welfare, of any 'person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public 
Health as dangerous to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
board of public welfare, unless the family is quarantined as provided in General 
Laws, chapter 111, section 95, in which event the board of health furnishes all 
aid required. In hospital cases, reimbursement by the Commonwealth is gov- 
erned by the provisions of General Laws, chapter 122, section 18. 

On December 1, 1938, there were 149 continued cases, and during the year no- 
tices were received from boards of health of 107 cities and towns concerning 1,- 
622 persons ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Burials (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 17 — as amended by Chapter 370 Acts of 
1939) — The law provides that if the expense of burial is not paid by kindred 
"An amount not exceeding $100. for the funeral expenses of each person over 12 
years of age, and not exceeding $40. for the funeral expenses of each person un- 
der that age, shall be paid by the Commonwealth ; provided that the board of pub- 
lic welfare shall file with each claim an affidavit of the undertaker stating the 
total amount of his bill, the amount received from the town, and the amount re- 
ceived from all other sources ; and provided, further, that if the total expense of 
the burial, by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of $100 no payment 
therefor shall be made by the Commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 490 from 84 cities 
and towns. 

Vocational Education (General Laws, ch. 74, sect. 22B). — The law provides 
that the Department of Public Welfare shall, upon request of the State Board of 
Vocational Education, make an investigation of the circumstances of persons ac- 
tually in training afforded by said board, who apply for aid during rehabilitation, 
and shall make a report of its finding to said board. 

During the year fourteen applications were received and investigated, thirteen 
of which were approved. 

Audit 

The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account of cases 
of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, burial, old age assistance, 
and aid to dependent children, are shown in the following tabulation. It is to be 
noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the total paid 
out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in question. 
This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this department 
are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the audit is shown. 
For actual expenditures from these appropriations see page 00. 

Classes of Cases Bills Claims Allowances Deductions 

Temporary Aid 

Sick State Poor 

Dangerous Diseases .... 

Burial 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance .... 

Totals- 144,468 $16,720,016.84 $16,381,287.43 $338,729.41 

* Includes $1,881.68 for transportation to the State Infirmary and $4,133.18 for all other trans- 
portation. 

Note: Of the allowance for Temporary Aid $599,720.66 was in payment of claims for years prior 
to 1937-38 which were re-audited and approved because of additional information received. 



34,350 


$ 5,063,447.80 


$ 4,999,222.81* 


$ 64,224.99 


11,644 


465,021.53 


337,934.39 


127,087.14 


1,674 


235,018.96 


198,427.85 


36,591.11 


680 


19,402.14 


14,998.80 


4,403.34 


11,551 


1,984,638.39 


1,953,361.37 


31,277.02 


84,569 


8,952,488.02 


8,877,342.21 


75,145.81 



12 P.D. 17 

Removals 

The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor persons to 
cities and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when not belonging in Massa- 
chusetts, to the state or place where they belong. The following table shows the 
removals made during the year : 

1937 1938 1939 

To other countries ......... 13 23 12 

To other states 205 226 205 

To towns of residence 1,383 1,414 1,493 



1,601 1,663 1,710 



Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses 

There is but one municipal lodging house in the Commonwealth known as a 
Wayfarers' Lodge, and this is maintained by the city of Boston. It has a capa- 
city for 174 men. No women are lodged. 

The other houses are either commercial or supported by charitable corpora- 
tions. They are located in Boston, Springfield, New Bedford, and Fall River, 
and have a total of 1,702 beds. 

The houses upon inspection by a representative of the department were found 
to be patronized nearly to capacity. Conditions are satisfactory, and in general 
the houses appear to be supplying a well-needed haven for wayfarers. 

Subdivision of Aid to Dependent Children 

[General Laws (Ter. Ed.) Chapter 118 as amended by Chapter 413, of the 

Acts of 1936] 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor 

Dec. 1, 1938 to Aug. 1, 1939 

Statistics 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1938, there were 9,282 par- 
ents with 22,501 dependent children under sixteen years of age receiving Aid to 
Dependent Children. 

The 9,282 parents were classified, according to their relationship to the depen- 
dent children as follows : 

8,653 parents were mothers 93.2% 

629 were relatives other than mothers ..... 6.8% 

8,653 mothers ) Most of the dependent children aided 

under this law were living with their 
own mothers, or with close women rel- 
atives (grandmothers, aunts or older 
sisters) or with close men relatives 
(fathers, uncles, older brothers or 
grandfathers). 

Only 7 parents out of 9,282 were step- 
fathers, stepsisters, stepmothers or 
stepbrothers. 



236 grandmothers 
166 aunts 
91 older sisters 
43 fathers 
40 uncles 
26 older brothers 
20 grandfathers 
3 stepfathers 
2 stepsisters 
1 stepmother 
1 stepbrother 



9,282 parents 
The 8,653 mothers were classified as 

4,867 widows ) More than half of the mothers were 

3,786 not widows ) widows (56.2%) 



Pt. I. 13 

The 3/86 mothers who were not widows were classified as follows : 

3,682 mothers had living husbands who were incapacitated or continually 
absent from home for reasons other than incapacity. 
95 were unmarried mothers 
9 were remarried to stepfathers of the dependent children who were 
not legally liable for the support of the children. 

The 3,682 living husbands of the 3,682 mothers were classified as follows : 

1,569 husbands were totally incapacitated 
1,323 husbands were physically incapacitated 
(of whom 368 were tuberculous) 
246 husbands were mentally incapacitated 

2,11.3 husbands were continually absent from home for reasons other than 

incapacity 
1,068 husbands were divorced or legally separated 

822 husbands had deserted their families 

223 husbands were in jail 

These figures show that the principal causes of dependency in the order of 
their numerical importance are 

1. Death of the father 4,867 

2. Divorce, legal separation or desertion of father . . . . . 1,890 

3. Physical incapacity of father . . . . ... . 1,323 

4. Mental incapacity of father ......... 246 

5. Incarceration of father .......... 223 

Death of the breadwinner of the family is still the principal cause of depen- 
dency (4,867 out of 8,653 mothers were widows). Marital difficulties leading to 
desertion, divorce or legal separation of parents of young children are a primary 
cause of dependency (1,890 out of 9,282). 

I recommend that an intensive statewide study of this whole subject be made 
in order to discover underlying causes, and how to promote preventive and cor- 
rective measures, such as the establishment of domestic relations courts, the more 
vigorous prosecution and more severe punishment of offenders, and more effec- 
tive probation methods. Some clerks of courts refuse to issue warrants for the 
arrest of deserting husbands unless their wives can furnish the exact addresses of 
the deserters. 

The inability of parents to provide parental care and support for their depen- 
dent children because of physical or mental incapacity is primafacie evidence of 
dependency which organized society recognizes and is willing to underwrite. 

The irresponsibility or criminal negligence of parents to support their depen- 
dent children is a very different matter, since it imposes upon the community, 
town, state, and federal governments, an unwarranted burden. 

Increase in number of A.D.C. cases 

On January 1, 1937 the Aid to Dependent Children Law superseded the Moth- 
ers' Aid Law. The scope of the law was greatly increased, by making eleven 
relatives other than mothers of dependent children eligible to act as parents. 
The residence requirement was reduced to one year's residence of a dependent 
child within the Commonwealth, and the right of appeal and to a fair hearing 
was established for parents who had been denied Aid to Dependent Children, and 
certain restrictive rules were modified. In consequence of these changes, many 
more parents were aided under this law by local boards of public welfare. 

(On Dec. 1, 1936 there were 5,082 parents receiving Mothers' Aid 
(On Dec. 1, 1938 " " 9,282 " " Aid to Depen- 

dent Children. 
This was an increase of 82.6% in two years. 



14 



(On Dec. 1, 


1938 


( Jan. 1, 


1939 


( Feb. 1, 


1939 


( Mar. 1, 


1939 


( Apr. 1, 


1939 


( May 1, 


1939 


( June 1, 


1939 


( July 1, 


1939 


( Aug. 1, 


1939 



9,489) 
9,706) 
9,839) 
10,010) 
10,181) 
10,375) 
10,555) 
10,629) 



P.D. 17 

During the eight months 
period— Dec. 1, 1938 to 
Aug. 1, 1939 the number 
of A.D.C. cases increased 
by 1, 347 (14.5%). 



Reorganisation of the Division of Aid and Relief 

On August 1, 1939 the Division of Aid and Relief was reorganized. The Sub- 
division of Aid to Dependent Children and the Bureau of Old Age Assistance 
were abolished, and seven welfare districts were established for the supervision 
of Aid to Dependent Children, Old Age Assistance and General Relief, with 
headquarters at Springfield, Worcester, Lawrence, Medford, Brockton, New 
Bedford, and Boston. 

Old Age Assistance 

On December 1, 1938 there were 73,772 active cases enrolled under the Old 
Age Assistance law. At the close of the fiscal year November 30, 1939 there 
were 81,359 cases, an increase of 7,566 cases. There were 16,866 new cases 
added during the year and 4,775 reopened cases. The cases closed numbered 
14,071 of which: 

6,181 closed on account of death 

2,637 moved to other towns 

2,537 had sufficient resources 

601 children were able to provide 

193 not deserving 

271 moved from the Commonwealth 

1,655 for various reasons 

It is expected that when the Old Age and Survivors Insurance benefits be- 
come operative January 1, 1940 it will make certain differences in relation to the 
Old Age Assistance Law. While the case load may increase, depending upon 
the amounts individuals will receive from the Old Age and Survivors Insurance, 
expenditures will not greatly increase since Old Age Assistance will be required 
only to supplement the amount of Old Age and Survivors Insurance. 

The active cases as of November 30, 1939 are as follows : 







Appeals 






Appeals 




Appeals 


Barnstable 




Approved 




Approved ■ Bristol 




Approved 


Barnstable . 


204 


1 


Gt. Barrington 


186 




Acushnet 


89 




Bourne 


132 




Hancock . 


19 




Attleboro 


471 




Brewster 


36 




Hinsdale 


50 




Berkley . . 


44 




Chatham . 


74 




Lanesboro 


27 




Dartmouth . 


201 




Dennis 


109 




Lee . . . 


81 




Dighton . 


51 




Eastham . 


25 




Lenox 


45 




Easton 


181 


2 


Falmouth 


109 




Monterey 


12 




Fairhaven 


239 


1 


Harwich . 


86 




Mt. Washingtor 






Fall River . 


2,155 


22 


Mash pee . 


23 




(No Cases) 


00 




Freetown 


64 




Orleans . 


48 




New Ashford 


4 




Mansfield 


135 




Provincetown 


123 




New Marlboro 


33 




New Bedford 


2,982 


1 


Sandwich 


61 




North Adams 


519 


1 


No. Attleboro 


225 




Truro 


6 




Otis . . . 


24 




Norton 


71 




Wellfleet 


39 




Peru . . 




8 




Raynham 
Rehoboth 


71 




Yarmouth 


68 


1 


Pittsfield 




899 


14 


54 










Richmond 




17 




Seekonk . 


61 




Berkshire 






Sandisfield 




9 




Somerset 


90 




Adams 


261 


4 


Savoy 




21 




Swansea 


123 


3 


Alford . . 


10 




Sheffield . 




57 




Taunton 


779 


3 


Becket . . 


31 




Stockbridge 




42 




Westport 


128 


1 


Cheshire 


41 


1 


Tyringham 




11 










Clarksburg . 


47 




Washington 


12 




Dukes 






Dalton . 


88 


1 


West Stockbridg 


e 32 




Chilmark 


10 




Egremont 
Florida . . 


19 




Williamstown 


103 


1 


Edgartown . • . 


54 




11 




Windsor 




10 




Gay Head . 


6 





Ipt. I. 

Duke — Continued 
Uosnold 

(No Cases) . < 

bak Bluffs . . < 

Tisbury ... 
West Tisbury . 



Appeals 
Approved 



Essex 
lAmesbury . 
■Andover . 
■Beverly . 
iBoxford . 
JDanvers . 
|Essex 
Georgetown . 
Gloucester . 
Groveland 
Hamilton 
Haverhill 
Ipswich . 
Lawrence 
Lynn 
Lynnfield 
Manchester . 
Marblehead . 
Merrimac 
Methuen 
Middleton . . 

Nahant . 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

No. Andover 

Peabody . 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Salem 

Salisbury 

Saugus 

Swampscott 

Topsfield . . 

Wenham . 

W. Newbury 

Franklin 

Ashfield . . . 
Bernardston . 
Buckland 
Charlemont . 
Colrain . 
Conway . 
Deerfield 
Erving 

Gill .... 
Greenfield 
Hawley . 
Heath . . . 

Leverett . 

Leyden . 

Monroe . 

Montague 

New Salem . 

Northfield . . 

Orange . 

Rowe 

Shelburne 

Shutesbury . 

Sunderland . 

Warwick 

Wendell . . . 

Whately . . . 

Hampden 
Agawam . 
B landlord 
Brimfield 
Chester . . . 
Chicopee . 
E. Longmeadow 
Granville 
Hampden 
Holland . . 
Holyoke . 
Longmeadow 
LudloW . 
Monson . 
Montgomery 
Palmer 
Russell . . 
Southwick 



328 
178 
397 
17 
225 
55 
92 
629 
98 
37 
1,437 
102 
1,656 
2,720 
53 
46 
. 252 
124 
429 
55 
45 
52 
468 
184 
342 
129 
55 
843 
124 
252 
166 
22 
21 
85 



16 

22 

56 

46 

32 

41 

41 

25 

14 
335 

20 

15 

31 
8 
7 

176 
17 
58 

166 
12 
50 
11 
16 
16 
21 
16 



115 
17 
33 
35 

542 

63 

9 

29 
7 

950 
36 
69 
100 
4 
138 
25 
37 



Springfield . 
Tolland 

(No Cases) 
Wales . • 
W. Springfield 
Westfield 
Wilbraham . 

Hampshire 

Amherst . 
Belchertown 
Chesterfield . 
Cummington 
Easthampton 
Goshen . 
Granby . 
Hadley . . 
Hatfield . . 
Huntington . 
Middlefield . 
Northampton 
Pelham . . 
Plainfield . 
So. Hadley . 
Southampton 
Ware \ 
Westhampton 
Williamsburg 
Worthington 

Middlesex 

Acton . . 
Arlington 
Ashby 
Ashland . 
Ayer . 

Bedford . . 
Belmont . 
Billerica . 
Boxboro . 
Burlington . 
Cambridge . 
Carlisle . 
Chelmsford . 
Concord . 
Dracut 
Dunstable 
Everett . 
Framingham 
Groton 
Holliston 
Hopkinton 
Hudson . 
Lexington 
Lincoln . 
Littleton 
Lowell 
Maiden . 
Marlboro 
Maynard 
Medford . 

Melrose . 

Natick 

Newton . 

No. Reading 

Pepperell 

Reading . 

Sherborn 

Shirley . 

Somerville . 

Stoneham 

Stow . 

Sudbury . 

Tewksbury . 

Townsend 
; Tyngsboro . 

Wakefield . 

Waltham 

Watertown . 

Wayland 
, Westford 
1 Weston . , 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Woburn . 



2,594 

00 

29 

230 

282 

46 



125 

77 

27 

26 

170 

8 

15 

10 

35 

30 

4 

384 

13 

14 

116 

24 

151 

16 

58 

24 



81 
388 

23 

57 

81 

46 

145 

201 

4 

63 
1,512 

13 

187 

68 

171 
7 

757 

413 
62 
98 

101 

203 

127 

22 

21 

2,410 

1,022 

419 
99 

908 

359 

242 

598 
70 
80 

253 

23 

39 

1,520 

180 

40 

24 

59 

79 

47 

288 

770 

378 

69 

75 

25 

115 

108 

311 



Approved 
Appeals 
17 



25 



Nantucket 
Nantucket . 



90 



Norfolk 
Avon .... 
Bellingham . 
Braintree 
Brookline 
Canton 
Cohasset . 
Dedham . 
Dover 
Foxboro . 
Franklin 
Holbrook 
Medfield . . . 
Medway . 
Millis . . . 
Milton . . 
Needham 

Norfolk . . . 

Norwood . 

Plainville 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Sharon 

Stoughton 

Walpole . 

Wellesley 

Westwood 

Weymouth . 

Wrentham . 

Plymouth 
Abington 
Bridgewater 
Brockton 
Carver 
Duxbury 
E. Bridgewater . 
Halifax . 
Hanover . 
Hanson . 
Hingham 
Hull .... 
Kingston 
Lakeville 
Marion . 
Marshfield . 

Mattapoisett 

Middleboro . 

Norwell . 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Plympton 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Scituate . 

Wareham 

W. Bridgewater 

Whitman 

Suffolk 
Boston . . , 
Chelsea . 
Revere 
Winthrop 

Worcester 

Ashburnham 

Athol . . . 

Auburn . 

Barre 

Berlin 

Blackstone . 

Bolton . . 

Boylston 

Brookfield 

Charlton . 

Clinton . 
) Douglas . 
) Dudley . . 
L E. Brookfield 

1 Fitchburg 
Gardner . 
Grafton . 

2 Hardwick 

2 Harvard . 

3 Holden . . 
Hopedale 
Hubbardston 
Lancaster 



71 
81 
322 
599 
99 
51 
222 
16 
131 
144 
131 
44 
100 
45 
183 
134 
39 
90 
39 
1,064 
215 
56 
191 
85 
87 
29 
577 
59 



218 

126 

1,993 

34 

92 

122 

39 

104 

91 

120 

58 

80 

62 

54 

76 

60 

327 

63 

72 

358 

23 

34 

316 

94 

189 

67 

247 



15 

Appeals 

Approved 

1 



14,242 59 

497 5 

481 4 

244 4 



55 

212 

132 

49 

32 

90 

29 

26 

37 

66 

350 

37 

53 

24 

554 

250 

134 

41 

24 

74 

37 

33 



16 














P.D. 17 


I 






Appeali 






Appeali 






Appeals 


I 


Worcester 


Con. 


Approved 




Approved 




Approved 


' 


Leicester 


72 




Paxton . 


11 




Templeton 


122 




I 


Leominster . 


521 


6 


Petersham . 


20 




Upton 


87 




I 


Lunenberg . 


61 




Phillipston . 


14 




Uxbridge 


82 


2 


1 


Mendon . 


33 




Princeton 


13 




Warren . 


85 


2 




Milford . . 


317 




Royalston 


25 


1 


Webster 


213 






Millburv 


127 


1 


Rutland . 


25 




West Boylston 


46 


2 




Millvillc . . 


46 




Shrewsbury . 


93 




West Brookfielc 


L 62 






New Braintree 


8 




Southboro 


55 




Westboro 


128 


1 




No. Hrookiield 


71 


4 


Southbridge . 


185 




Westminster 


39 






Northboro 


77 




Spencer . 


137 


2 


Winchendon 


163 


2 




Northbridge 


112 




Sterling . 


49 




Worcester 


3,114 


20 




Oakham . 


13 




Sturbridge . 


60 













Oxford . . 


132 




Sutton 


56 








516 





Subdivision Of Social Service 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor 

During the year, 5,788 patients (2,745 of them new admissions) received care 
at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary. This is 296 less than the num- 
ber cared for last year. The average daily number of patients was 2,826 or 64 
less than last year. On December 1, 1939, there were at the Tewksbury State 
Hospital and Infirmary 246 settled cases which could not be provided necessary 
hospital care in their own communities. Many requests for admission of settled 
cases by local boards of public welfare had to be refused because of overcrowded 
conditions in the men's hospital wards. 

Admissions resulting from unemployment might be prevented if more consid- 
eration were given to the applicant when he applies to the local board of public 
welfare for admission. If such service were given, the institution would receive 
only those patients in need of hospital care, while able-bodied persons could and 
should be assisted in the community under General Relief. The District Offices 
of the State Department can be of help in improving the selectivity of admissions 
to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary by advising and assisting local 
boards to give more careful service to the homeless and unemployed in their own 
communities. 

Soon after admission of a patient, a social worker of the Subdivision of Social 
Service interviews him so that plans for the patient's rehabilitation in the com- 
munity may be ready when the doctor recommends discharge. 

Men 

Because the men's wards became so overcrowded in January, it was necessary 
to limit admissions. Since the city of Boston sends the greatest number of pa- 
tients to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary, it seemed advisable to at- 
tempt to prove that investigation at intake would reduce admissions and result in 
more intelligent assistance being given to the men applying to the Institutions 
Registration Department of the city of Boston. To conduct this experiment, for 
three months beginning January 1, 1939, a social worker from this subdivision 
interviewed every applicant to the Institutions Registration Department. The 
sick were sent to Long Island Hospital at the expense of the Commonwealth un- 
til beds were available at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary; able- 
bodied, homeless men were sent to the Salvation Army for work, or assisted un- 
der General Relief at the People's Palace Hotel from which they could seek em- 
ployment. Many applicants were returned to relatives or to place of settlement. 
Although it was originally intended that this experiment would be conducted 
onty during the winter months when admissions are normally high, the results 
obtained were sufficiently satisfactory to warrant its being permanently con- 
tinued. The statistics showing the disposition of 987 male applicants for care at 
the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary present interesting facts : 

Referred to Department of Mental Health 2 

Referred to Long Island Hospital . . . ■ . . . \ ' 51 

Referred to Veterans' Bureau ........ 14 

Referred to Industrial Aid Society 95 



Pt. I. 17 

Referred to Prisoners' Societies 10 

Referred to Salvation Army for jobs 18 

Referred to Central Application Bureau . 32 

Referred to Wayfarers' Lodge ......... 57 

Referred to People's Palace Hotel 30 

Referred to Catholic Charitable Bureau 1 

Referred to Morgan Memorial . 1 

Referred to Boston Overseers of Public Welfare for reinstatement . . 17 

Referred to Place of Settlement 99 

Referred to Other States 17 

Referred to Relatives 10 

Did not return . . . ... 37 

Admitted to Tewksbury 585 



Total 987 

To have established the much needed and long anticipated application and in- 
take process in the Institutions Registration Department is a definite step toward 
the elimination of other than the chronically ill from the Tewksbury State Hos- 
pital and Infirmary. 

Immediate consideration must be given to relieve the Tewksbury Board of 
Public Welfare of the necessity of admitting applicants to the institution. Be- 
cause of its proximity to the institution, the board receives applications from 
many wayfarers, and since the board is not staffed to investigate the needs of 
large numbers of applicants, admission blanks are dispensed automatically. Three 
hundred and eighty-six men, some of whom had been refused admission by the 
city of Boston, applied to the Tewksbury Board of Public Welfare for such ad- 
mission. 

There were admitted during the year 365 men with diagnosis of alcoholism, as 
compared with 538 last year. It was necessary to commit 35 male ward patients 
to the State Farm for drunkenness. Many men were so ill at admission that it 
was necessary to place them temporarily in the mental wards. The institution is 
not equipped to treat alcoholism as a disease, although the Commonwealth should 
provide hospital and clinic treatment for such patients. Those men who are be- 
yond treatment should be sent to the State Farm at Bridgewater for custodial 
care. Scientific treatment might re-establish younger men as assets to society. 
Enough facts and figures have been secured and surveys made by courts, proba- 
tion officers, and physicians, to prove that the problem has been ignored both 
medically and socially. The situation is now becoming a problem most costly in 
loss of human values not only to the individual and to his family, but to the en- 
tire community as well. 

Social Service for Men 

Interviewed at admission to Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary 2,165 

Interviewed and discharged without investigation . 784 

Received social service at Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary (Short service 669; 

intensive service 276) 945 

Miscellaneous services rendered to patients 3,000 

Employment found , 143 

Assisted to return to other states 51 

Assisted to return to. other countries 1 

Rehabilitated tuberculous patients (Old Age Assistance 4; General Relief 13) . . . 17 

Rehabilitated on Old Age Assistance 30 

Rehabilitated on General Relief ._ 19 

Assisted in community while looking for work 444 

Women 

On December 1, 1939, there were 433 patients in the women's wards. During 
the year, the Women's Reformatory did not transfer its patients for confinement 
to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary, since the law prohibiting such 
transfers became effective in September, 1938. 



18 P - D - 17 

For the socially delinquent young woman, a long stay for medical treatment is 
often necessary. A constructive plan might be worked out for some training in 
homemaking and child care, so that time spent in the institution would not only 
bring restored health but also develop skills for more advantageous employment 
opportunities. 

The older women are usually admitted for terminal care or treatment of 
chronic disease. Additional modern equipment for physiotherapy and other 
treatment would hasten improvement of these patients, shorten their stay, and 
possibly renew their courage to overcome their handicaps. 

There were admitted during the year for confinement 21 young women from 
the Girls Industrial School, and 6 from the three schools for the feebleminded. 

No unusual problems have been presented, and the steady flow of admissions 
and discharges proceeded as usual. There is detained at the Tewksbury State 
Hospital and Infirmary an ever-increasing number of feebleminded women, be- 
cause the institutions of the Department of Mental Health continue to be over- 
crowded. This classification of patients have no responsible relatives; they 
cannot be recommended for employment ; and for their own protection they need 
custodial care which must be given at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirm- 
ary until such time as they can be permanently committed to the Department of 
Mental Health. There were 40 patients of ; this classification at the institution 
during the year. 

There were 93 births at the institution during the year, as compared to 123 
during the previous year. 

Children 

On December 1, 1939, there were 164 minors at the Tewksbury State Hospital 
and Infirmary. 

One hundred and twenty-one (121) children were under 15 years of age, of 
whom 36 were wards of the Division of Child Guardianship, too feebleminded to 
be placed in foster homes and awaiting commitment to the schools for the feeble- 
minded. Twenty (20) other mentally deficient children, with spina bifida, hy- 
drocephalus, and other congenital malformations, were admitted to relieve des- 
perate family situations. These children should more properly come under the 
care of the Department of Mental Health. Eight (8) feebleminded boys be- 
tween 7 and 15 years of age are housed at Stone House, since they are too old 
to remain in the Children's Hospital and too young to be admitted to the men's 
ward, which condition requires the maintenance of a fully equipped and expen- 
sive unit to care for a very small number. Sixty-three (63) infants were await- 
ing discharge of their mothers, who were receiving treatment for syphilis, gon- 
orrhea, or were detained because of mental deficiency. One (1) tuberculous 
child was admitted until her transfer to the North Reading Sanatorium could be 
arranged, while one (1) child with an acute septic condition was admitted from 
the town of Tewksbury. 

The 43 minors between fifteen and twenty-one years of age are divided into 
two groups : 

Fifteen (15) were wards of the Division of Child Guardianship (8 boys and 
7 girls) ; of these, 9 were awaiting commitment to the schools for the feeble- 
minded and 6 were ill with chronic or incurable diseases. 

Of the 28 others (5 boys and 23 girls), 11 were illegitimately pregnant, 8 were 
receiving treatment for venereal disease, 2 had tuberculosis, 5 were ill with 
chronic diseases, and 2 were awaiting discharge. 

The Subdivision of Social Service considers every application for the admis- 
sion of a child to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary in the light of the 
social situation, and investigates every available resource, including application 
to the Department of Mental Health, before approving admission. 





Discharged to: 




126 
58 

36 

5 

41 

5 
26 


Court 

Other states 

Reformatory for Women (1 woman 

and 1 child) 

State Schools for Feebleminded . 

Other institutions 

Absconded 

Total . . .-. . . . 


7 
2 

2 
12 
28 
17 


373 



Pt. I. 19 

Women and Children admitted to the Tewksbury State Hospital 
and Infirmary during the year 

Ages of Admission: 

Under 1 year ., 32 17 to 21 years 74 

1 to 7 years 15 Over 21 years 250 

8 to 16 years ....... 18 

Total . 389 

Births 93 

Women and Children discharged from the Tewksbury State Hospital 
and Infirmary during the year 

Discharged to: 

Relatives and friends .... 

Employment _. . _ . 

Employment with child (18 women 
with 18 children) 

Private agencies 

Place of settlement .... 

Deported by U. S. Immigration Ser- 
vice 

Division of Child Guardianship . 

Girls' Parole Department (7 women 
and 1 child) 8 

Deaths 116 

Placement and Supervision 

This year has seen an increase in follow-up service and supervision of patients 
discharged to the community as well as of persons accepted for service to pre- 
vent unnecessary admissions to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary. On 
December 1, there were 523 persons receiving various degrees of service for in- 
tensive and specialized problems, such as the unmarried mother and the socially 
delinquent young woman. In some cases, only slight services were necessary, 
such as making financial arrangements for dentures or a winter overcoat. The 
quantity and quality of extra services cannot be estimated. Clothing is collected 
for women working for small wages, Christmas gifts are distributed to hundreds 
of persons, special entertainments are given for the patients at the Tewksbury 
State Hospital and Infirmary, and Thanksgiving dinners and Easter baskets are 
distributed to the sick and to shut-ins, all of which indicates the interest and de- 
votion of the social workers. 

Summary of Placement Work 

Persons under active supervision, November 30, 1939 ' . . 492 

22 mothers with 22 children at work 44 

(Mothers boarding children in foster homes ........ 137 

Other women and girls under supervision 280 

(In institutions, 30) 
Other children under supervision (in own homes or foster homes) ... 31 

Children referred to Division of Child Guardianship for placement 22 

Girls over 21, accepted for supervision 10 

From Division of Child Guardianship 10 

From Girls' Parole 

Adoptions of children under supervision 10 

Marriages of unmarried mothers while under supervision 10 

Replacements in employment 151 

Recidivists under supervision 9 

Readmissions to Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary for illness .... 26 

Visits of investigation 1,194 

Visits to clients 2,128 

Visits with clients to hospitals 138 

Wage homes investigated 143 

51 savings accounts for clients at work, amounting to $6,806.61 

Applications at office # 103 

For maternity service 24 

For social treatment 34 

For transportation 45 



20 P.D. 17 

Summary of Court Work 

Warrants on illegitimacy complaints 12 

Warrants served . - 10 

Cases appealed to Superior Court 1 

Committed to Schools for the Feebleminded . 

Adjudications of paternity and court orders for support 10 

Agreements for support of children born out of wedlock (Out of court) .... 8 

Adoptions of children ..•*•. ^ 

Lump sum settlements for support of illegitimate children 2 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children $3,025.23 

Money paid out for support of illegitimate children $3,750.84 

Number of bank accounts for illegitimate children 75 

Balance on hand for illegitimate children, November 30, 1939 $11,298.07 



Office Applications 

The subdivision has continued to provide transportation for certain transients 
who have applied to the Boston Overseers of the Public Welfare, the Travelers' 
Aid Society, and other social agencies. Interim assistance is sometimes ar- 
ranged with private agencies until authorization to return is received from the 
home state or from responsible relatives. Such emergency service hastens the 
return of the transient to his home, and eliminates the need of public assistance 
in this Commonwealth. The assistance of the Travelers' Aid Society, with its 
inter-city network of agencies, is invaluable in rendering prompt and adequate 
service to transients. 

In this Commonwealth, the transient is not the problem that he is in some 
other states, because we have within the Division of Aid & Relief an appropria- 
tion immediately available for the transportation of dependents, as well as a Gen- 
eral Relief law which provides for immediate assistance to any person stranded 
in a city or town, until a suitable plan has been arranged for his care. 

The accompanying tables enumerate how 230 transients were served during 
the year ending November 30, 1939 : 



Single men 

Single women 

Couples .... 

Families .... 

One parent with children 

Children unaccompanied 



Total 



61 

44 

38 

28 with 27 children 

11 with 13 children 



182 with 48 children 
48 

230 



Ages of Applicants 
Under 15 years 
15—20 years 
21—25 years 
26 — 30 years 
31 — 35 years 
36 — 40 years 
41 — 50 years 
Over 50 years 

Total 



48 
36 
31 
25 
19 
21 
26 
24 

230 



Social Agencies Referring for Transportation: 

Boston Overseers of Public Welfare . 105 

(20 children) 

Travelers' Aid Society .... 52 

Applicants Direct 16 

State Temporary Aid 15 

Courts 9 



Hospitals . . . , 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health 
Private Agencies 



3 

2 
1 

27 

230 



Disposition of Applications: 

Returned to legal residence . . . 74* 

Returned to relatives 36 

Returned to work 8 

Kef erred to other agencies ... 28 

Did not accept transportation ... 22 

Would not permit investigation . . 16 
Settlement not acknowledged by alleged 

place of settlement 36 

Transportation elsewhere secured . . 10 

230 
*22 children 



Returned to other states . . . 107* 

Returned to other countries . . 7 
Returned to place of settlement in 

Massachusetts . . ... . 4 

Referred to other agencies . . 28 

Did not accept transportation . 22 

Would not permit investigation . 16 
Settlement not acknowledged by 

alleged place of settlement . . 36 

Transportation elsewhere secured . 10 

230 
*26 children 

Other applications for social advice and treatment were received. A definite 
function of the subdivision is to prevent unnecessary admissions to the Tewks- 
bury State Hospital and Infirmary by utilizing other resources .or by assuming 
the responsibility for care of the case in the community. During the year 36 
cases were accepted for social treatment, 14 of which represented problems of 
unmarried maternity. 



7 |Pt. I. 21 

Ten (10) other young women were referred for continued supervision by the 
Division of Child Guardianship and the Girls' Parole Branch of the Division of 
Juvenile Training, because they had reached the age of twenty-one and were 
without friends or relatives. Since there are no private case work agencies in- 
terested in the older girl, it seems quite necessary and logical for this subdivision, 
even though limited by law, to carry on the service which is so much needed by 
2 many lonely girls. 



Students in Training 



The Simmons College School of Social Work and the Boston College School 
of Social Work have continued to send students to the subdivision for field work 
experience. The men at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary present 

) numerous problems which offer a challenge to the men students. Constantly re- 
curring factors such as the lack of education or vocational training, leading to 
unskilled labor, and thence to unemployment, should arouse studious and 
thoughtful concern as to the fundamental causes in the breakdown of human con- 

l duct. The student from Simmons has this year been making a follow-up study 
of the unmarried mothers who were at the Tewksbury State Hospital and In- 
firmary in 1931, to determine the status of the mother and child seven years 
after the baby was born. The results of such a study should be helpful in evalu- 
ation of the social treatment accorded the patients. 



General Summary 



Women over 21 admitted to Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary . . . . . 389 

Minors admitted to Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary 139 

Births at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary 93 

5 Men admitted to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary 2,165 

Women and children discharged by Subdivision of Social Service > 373 

Men discharged by Subdivision of Social Service 2,076 

Children discharged to other Divisions . 31 

Deaths at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary (hospital wards) .... 378 

Applications for assistance at office 230 

Persons under supervision in the community, November 30, 1939 567 



Subdivision of Appeals 

Louis R. Lipp, Supervisor 

Amendments to the Old Age Assistance and the Aid to Dependent Children 
Laws in reference to appeals, abolished the appeal board, and created a referee 
system. Under the authority of the amended law, the Commissioner appointed 
nine referees ; one to act as supervisor, and one for each district office (with the 
exception of the one district which requires the services of two referees). The 
present appeal laws follow : 

Chap. 481 

An Act further regulating appeals under the old age assistance law, 

so called. 

Chapter one hundred and eighteen A of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by striking out section three, as most recently amended by chapter two hundred 
and eighty-five of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-eight, and inserting in 
place thereof the following; Section 3. Any person aggrieved by the failure of 
any town to render adequate assistance under this chapter, or by the failure of 
the board of public welfare or bureau of old age assistance to approve or reject 
an application for assistance hereunder within thirty days after receiving such 
application, shall have a right to fair hearing, after due notice, upon appeal to 
the department in the manner and form prescribed by the department ; provided, 
that such appeal is received by the department within sixty days after official no- 
tice of the action taken by the board of public welfare or bureau of old age assist- 
ance has been received by the applicant. Such hearing shall be conducted by 
the commissioner of public welfare, hereinafter referred to as the commissioner. 



P.D. 17 

or a referee designated by the commissioner. The commissioner or any referee 
designated by him is hereby empowered to subpoena witnesses, administer oaths, 
take testimony and secure the production of such books, papers, records and 
documents as may be relevant to such hearing. The decision of the commis- 
sioner or of the designated referee, when approved by the commissioner, shall be 
the decision of the department. Fair hearings shall be granted upon any appeal 
in relation to the following matters : 

1. The matter of denial of assistance by the local board of public welfare or 
bureau of old age assistance ; 

2. The matter of a change in the amount of assistance given ; 

3. The matter of withdrawal of assistance ; 

4. The matter of failure to receive adequate assistance under this chapter by 
reason of the non-fulfillment of any agreement made by a third person to con- 
tribute toward the support and maintenance of such aged person. The depart- 
ment may also, upon its own motion, review any decision of a local board of 
public welfare or of a bureau of old age assistance, and may consider any appli- 
cation upon which a decision has not been made by such a board or bureau with- 
in the required time. 

The department may make such additional investigation as it may deem neces- 
sary and shall make such decision as to the granting of assistance and the 
amount of assistance to be granted as in its opinion is justified and in conformity 
with the provisions of this chapter. Applicants or recipients affected by such 
decisions of the department shall, upon request, be given reasonable notice and 
opportunity for a hearing by the department. The provisions relating to the 
conduct of fair hearings and decisions thereon made as provided in this section, 
shall be equally applicable in all cases wherein the department acts upon its own 
motion. 

Every decision of the department shall be rendered not later than sixty days 
after the claim of appeal was filed or after the department acted upon its own 
motion to review any decision of such a local board or bureau, as the case may 
be. Every decision of the department shall be final and binding upon the local 
board involved and shall be complied with by such local board or bureau. 

This section shall not be construed to limit the right of a board of public wel- 
fare or bureau of old age assistance or its officials to confer with the commis- 
sioner on policies and procedures of the department. 

Chap. 248 

An Act relative to right of appeal under the law 
providing aid to dependent children. 

Chapter one hundred and eighteen of the General Laws is hereby amended by 
striking out section eight, as appearing in section one of chapter four hundred 
and thirteen of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-six, and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — Section 8. Any person aggrieved by the failure of any 
town to render adequate aid under this chapter, or by the failure of the board of 
public welfare of a town to approve or reject an application for aid hereunder 
within thirty days after receiving such application, shall have a right to a fair 
hearing, after due notice, upon appeal to the department. Such hearing shall be 
conducted by a referee designated by the commissioner. Any person so desig- 
nated is hereby empowered to subpoena witnesses, administer oaths, take testi- 
mony and secure the production of such books, papers, records and documents as 
may be relevant to such hearing. The decision of the referee, when approved 
by the commissioner, shall be the decision of the department and shall be final 
and binding upon the local board of public welfare involved and shall be com- 
plied with by such local board. Fair hearings shall be granted upon any appeal 
in relation to the following matters : 

1. The matter of denial of aid by the local board of public welfare; 

2. The matter of a change in the amount of aid given ; 

3. The matter of withdrawal of aid. 



Pt. I. 23 

The department upon its own motion may review any decision of a local board 
of public welfare and may consider any application upon which a decision has 
not been made by such board within a reasonable time. 

Appeals Approved 516 

Appeals Denied . 1,261 

Appeals Withdrawn . 45 

Died 18 

Assistance Granted Before Action by Appeal Division . . . .104 

Moved . 5 

Closed for Various Reasons 70 

Pending ... . . . . . . . . . .307 

Decisions Made or Other Disposition ........ 2,019 






Bureau of Research and Statistics 

John J. Donnelly, Supervisor of Welfare Statistics 

The Bureau of Research and Statistics completed its third year at the end of 
1939. The personnel, appointed under Civil Service regulations, consists of a 
Supervisor of Welfare Statistics assisted by field representatives, senior statis- 
tical clerks, and a clerical and stenographic force, totaling 35 persons. The 
functions of the unit include collecting, compiling, analyzing, and publishing 
statistics of the principal types of relief which may be enumerated as follows : 

1. Statistics of assistance and aid administered under the provisions of Titles I 

and IV of the Social Security Act: Title I — Grants to States for Old Age 
Assistance, and Title IV — Grants to States for Aid to Dependent Children. 
These Titles require that the state agency administering Old Age Assistance 
and Aid to Dependent Children shall make reports in such form and con- 
taining information as the Social Security Board may from time to time re- 
quire, and shall comply with such provisions as said board may find neces- 
sary to assure the correctness and verification of the reports. 

2. Statistics of General Relief administered under the laws of the Common- 

wealth and the regulations of the Department of Public Welfare. This 
information is submitted by every city and town in the Commonwealth each 
month on prescribed forms and is combined by the bureau into county and 
state totals. 

3. Statistics on the several most important types of relief from ten of the largest 

cities of the Commonwealth, consolidated into what is called the Urban Sur- 
vey and figures for 23 selected towns collected and compiled into a report 
known as the Rural Survey. 

4. Statistics of Soldiers' Relief granted under the laws of the Commonwealth 

and the regulations of the Department of State Aid and Pensions. Through 
the courtesy of the Department of State Aid and Pensions, the bureau was 
given the opportunity to collect data on the number of cases, the number of 
persons represented, and the amount expended monthly by each city and 
town. 

5. Statistics of other types of aid and assistance administered by other state and 

federal agencies in furtherance of the policy to develop the bureau as a 
clearing house for all kinds of statistical information relative to the entire 
social security program. Therefore, the bureau has maintained tabulations 
of data secured from the following local agencies : Department of Education, 
Division of the Blind; Work Projects Administration; National Youth Ad- 
ministration; Federal Old Age and Survivors Insurance; Unemployment 
Compensation Commission; Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Surplus 
Commodities Division of the Department of Public Welfare. 

6. Statistics with respect to matters closely associated with relief. Tabulations 

are maintained by the bureau on employment data compiled and published 
by the Department of Labor and Industries ; the Index of Industrial Activity 



24 P.D- 17 1 

in Massachusetts compiled by the State Planning Board; the Cost of Living 
Index published by the Department of Labor and Industries, Commission 
on the Necessaries of Life ; other miscellaneous statistical information which 
may be used in describing or analyzing the relief situation. To all these 
cooperating agencies we here extend our acknowledgment for the permis- 
sion granted us to republish their figures. 
7. Statistics relative to the social phases of the various types of relief adminis- 
tered by the department, collected on prescribed Social Data Cards. 
The staff of the bureau includes several different Civil Service classifications. 
The two most numerous are the 8 social workers (field representatives) and the 
17 senior statistical clerks. The social workers, each of whom represents the 
bureau in an assigned area of the commonwealth, advise and assist the local; 
boards and officials relative to maintaining welfare records, compiling the regu- 
lar or special reports and filling out the Social Data Cards. Through the mu- 
tually cooperative efforts of the field representatives and the local officials, statis- 
tical reports have improved progressively so that at the present time a workable 
system of procedure and reporting has been developed, assuring, on the whole, 
prompt and correct reports. 

The bureau is organized so that the compiling and tabulating work is appor- 
tioned by type of relief among several groups into which the staff is divided. 
Definite assignment of duties is made to each group which consist of the neces- 
sary number of workers required to perform the assignments and having the 
requisite qualifications. 

In addition to complete files of the various types of relief statistics for each 
city and town, the bureau maintains up-to-date records for the several counties 
and for the Commonwealth as a whole. Data are published currently in a va- 
riety of forms; for example, for the individual cities and towns, and in sum- 
maries. The following table will serve to illustrate this, while the figures pre- 
sented may be useful to interested readers. 



Table I 

Average Monthly Case Load and Total Yearly Expenditures 
By County and Type of Relief 

Massachusetts — 1 939 









Total 
Expenditures 


Old Age 
Assistance 


Aid to 
Dependent Children 


County 


Average 
monthly- 
case load 


Expenditures 


Average 
monthly 
case load 


Expenditures 


Grand Total 

Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Bristol . . 
Dukes . . 
Essex . . 
Franklin 
Pfampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex 
Nantucket 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Suffolk . . 
Worcester 






$58,598,507.97 

697,683.13 

1,902,289.45 

5.160,355.49 

105,681.98 

6,758,741.03 

664,418.68 

4,287,481.76 

739,673.17 

11,596,378.94 

59,770.99 

3,161,808.60 

2,793,086.15 

13,978,696.55 

6,692,742.05 


79,206 

1,099 

2,630 

7,949 

187 

11,490 
1,234 
5,188 
1,279 

14,926 

86 

4,757 

4,988 

14,863 
8,530 


$27,022,294.78 

397,152.64 

931,078.49 

2,575,736.98 

71,845.70 

3,801,413.12 

416,696.87 
1,792,685.35 

420,894.81 
5,046,982.51 
29,957.36 
1,665,446.04 
1,739,310.22 
5,220,057.82 
2,913,036.87 


10,415 

128 
234 
895 

21 
942 

89 

693 

128 

1,827 

13 

526 

357 

3,622 

940 


$7,464,876.10 " 

76,269.89 

165,948.29 

514,061.15 

9,873.27 

667,934.28 

57,006.58 

494,743.20 

77,625.78 

1,382,131.97 

11,583.55 

381,008.35 

231,306.43 

2,729,399.42 

665,983.94 



Pt. I. 



25 



Table I — Continued 



County 



General Relief 



Average 
monthly 
case load 



Expenditures 



Relief 



Hospitalizati 



Burials 



Grand Total 



Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Dukes . . . 

Essex . . 

Franklin . 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk . 

Plymouth 

Suffolk . 

Worcester 



68,246 

657 

1,848 

6,988 

66 

6,961 

537 

4,979 

830 

13,191 

70 

2,761 

2,695 

18,794 

7,869 



$22,084,169.67 

196,573.64 

731,197.21 

1,658,051.03 

20,242.45 

2,029,705.71 

172,094.03 
1,723,086.45 

213,070.43 

4,805,798.30 

17,561.85 

1,011,376.60 

716,778.68 
5,960,703.83 
2,827,929.46 



$1,877,217.35 

23,425.61 
68,764.46 

391,498.25 
3,397.56 

243,483.12 
15,991.20 

260,670.81 
25,929.53 

336,169.09 

268.23 

97,259.08 

98,482.82 

55,920.19 

255,957.40 



$149,950.07 

3,961.35 
5,301.00 

21,008.08 
323.00 

16,204.80 
2,630.00 

16,295.95 
2,152.62 

25,297.07 

400.00 

6,718.53 

7,208.00 

12,615.29 

29,834.38 



The regular monthly summaries submitted to Washington, compiled from the 
individual city and town reports, and covering the various types of relief, show 
the case load, expenditures, and average expenditures per recipient. During 
1939 the following payments were granted to recipients of Old Age Assistance : 



1939 

January 

February ...... 

March . . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August ...... 

September v . . 
October . 

November 

December 

Average 

Note: (a) Total for the year. 



Table II 




ie Assistance— 


-1939 


Number 


Amount 


of Cases 


Expended 


75,761 


$2,147,526 


76,479 


2,177,068 


77,084 


2,203,730 


77,718, 


2,212,426 


78,498 


2,214,883 


79,052 


2,236,843 


79,550 


2,243,302 


80,136 


2,266,778 


80,630 


2,280,815 


81,190 


2,305,321 


81,922 


2,348,338 


82,450 


2,385,265 


79,206 


$27,022,295 (a) 



Average per 
Recipient 

$28.35 
28.47 
28.59 
28.47 
28.22 
28.30 
28.20 
28.29 
28.29 
28.39 
28.64 
28.93 



28.43 



A survey of the data in Table II above shows that there was an uninterrupted 
increase from month to month during the year in cases and expenditures. The 
Federal Grants in 1939 on Old Age Assistance amounted to $12,728,263 while 
the state and cities' and towns' shares were $9,529,355 and $4,764,677 respec- 
tively. 



26 



P.D. 17 



It will be seen that a less regular increasing tendency was present in the fig- 
ures for Aid to Dependent Children during 1939. Data relative to this type of 
relief are presented in Table III below. 



Table III 
Aid to Dependent Children — 1939 



1939 

January 
February- 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



Average 
Note: (a) Total for the year 



Families 


Children 


Expended 


Per Family 


Per Child 


9,654 


23,476 


$ 622,522 


$64.48 


$26.52 


9,796 


23,731 


581,745 


59.39 


22.41 


9,939 


24,038 


593,154 


59.68 


24.68 


10,093 


24,282 


599,212 


59.37 


24.68 


10,340 


24,737 


641,143 


62.01 


25.92 


10,434 


24,872 


595,155 


57.04 


23.93 


10,500 


24,998 


606,801 


57.79 


24.27 


10,583 


25,173 


620,063 


58.59 


24.53 


10,620 


26,593 


626,984 


59.04 


23.58 


10,801 


27,731 


633,873 


58.69 


22.86 


11,044 


28,280 


657,023 


59.49 


23.23 


11,180 


28,633 
25,545 


689,201 
$7,464,876 (a) 


61.65 


24.07 


10,415 


$59.73 


$24.35 



The Federal Grants on Aid to Dependent Children amounted to $1,430,748; 
the State's share was $2,488,292 and the cities' and towns', $3,545,836. 

Figures of General Relief do not have the regularity from month to month ex- 
hibited by the so-called categorical types of relief. This is due, of course, to the 
fact that the trend of General Relief is affected by industrial employment con- 
ditions, by general business conditions, and by the trend of employment in work 
relief programs. Also a definite seasonal movement is evident in this type of 
relief, being less in the late spring and summer months than in the fall and win- 
ter months. The 1939 figures are presented in Table IV below. 













Table IV 










General Relief- 


-1939 








NUMEER 


Number 


Total 




Average 


Average 




OF 


of Single 


Number 


Amount 


Per 


Per 


Average 


1939 Families 


Residents 


of Cases 


Expended 


Family 


Sin. Res. 


Per Case 


January . . . 52,674 


20,433 


73,107 


$ 2,020,049 


$31.36 


$17.94 


$27.63 


February 






52,310 


19,691 


72,001 


1,961,163 


30.61 


18.23 


27.24 


March 






53,606 


- 20,243 


73,849 


2,127,510 


32.15 


19.92 


28.81 


April 






49,625 


19,636 


69,261 


1,787,249 


29.04 


17.59 


25.80 


May . 






45,685 


19,207 


64,892 


1,785,001 


31.29 


18.46 


27.51 


June . 






43,838 


19,246 


63,084 


1,659,637 


30.01 


17.79 


26.31 


July . 






43,497 


19,267 


62,764 


1,601,397 


28.84 


17.94 


25.51 


August 






45,267 


19,903 


65,170 


1,736,576 


30.02 


18.91 


26.65 


September 




49,733 


20,559 


70,294 


1,766,396 


28.25 


17.53 


25.13 


October 




47,730 


20,389 


68,121 


1,790,828 


30.02 


17.78 


26.29 


November 




47,815 


20,603 


63,420 


1,881,034 


31.55 


18.12 


27.49 


December 






47,354 


20,630 


67,986 


1,967,330 


33.37 


18.94 


28.94 



Average . . . 48,262 19,984 68,246 

Note: (a) Total for the year. 



$20,084,170 (a) $30.57 



$18.26 



$24.52 



In addition to the regular periodic reports submitted by the bureau to Wash- 
ington and used by the department, there are frequent calls for special reports or 
tabulations which usually describe some particular phase of the relief situation 
in more detail than can be obtained from the regularly published reports of the 
bureau. The increasing number of such requests is encouraging as it not only 
indicates the growing interest in the welfare problem from a statistical view- 
point, but in a measure evaluates the work of the bureau as a public agency. 
Such organizations as chambers of commerce, taxpayers' associations, private 
welfare units, and universities frequently ask for data which the bureau has 
available. Such requests are always welcome. 



|Pt. I. 27 

Some of the special studies and surveys inaugurated in the previous year were 
(either completed or carried on during 1939, and other new ones were begun. 
For example, the series on Soldiers' Relief was brought up to date and the col- 
lection of these figures. was well established, so that this type of assistance has 
[become one on which the bureau now receives regular monthly reports. 

The study of local procedures, records, and forms was continued during the 
year. The findings will be used when uniform local procedures and basic rec- 
ords are introduced in the near future as is now planned. 

The collection of figures on local A.D.C. administrative expenses, which first 
appeared to be a one-time survey, developed during the year into a regular re- 
porting procedure for which the bureau made up reporting forms and instruc- 
tions for the use of the local boards. This information will be collected regu- 
larly each quarter in the future so that reimbursement to the state, cities and 
towns from Federal funds for A.D.C. administration expenses will be forth- 
coming. 

The collaboration with the graduate school of Public Administration of Har- 
vard University on the study of local relief loads and expenditures as related to 
the fiscal abilities of Massachusetts cities and towns continued during the year. 
In fact the study took on such a wide scope that it developed beyond the facilities 
of the bureau. Therefore, late in the year plans were started to continue the 
work by a W.P.A. project sponsored by the department and supervised by the 
bureau. 

The comprehensive and detailed survey on the organization of local welfare 
boards was concluded in June, and the information obtained served a very useful 
purpose in the reorganization of the department made this year. The bureau 
participated in other phases of the reorganization. Members of its staff took 
part in the instruction given at the July Institute, and assistance was given by 
the bureau in compiling and publishing the Manual for the Administration of 
Public Assistance issued for the guidance of the state and local welfare staffs. 
The location of the district offices and the division of the Commonwealth into 
districts and areas were based in large part on statistical data furnished by the 
bureau. An added note of interest is that the name of the statistical unit was 
definitely designated as BUREAU and it was made a separate unit to serve the 
entire department, administratively responsible directly to the Commissioner. 

Information and data published from time to time by the bureau appears either 
in special reports or in one of its regular publications such as the Quarterly Bul- 
letin. This bulletin contains various summary tables, with the latest available 
figures, presenting all the different types of data compiled by the bureau. Special 
bulletins are issued at times, the most recent being Special Bulletin No. 6, giving 
for each city, town, and county, and for the Commonwealth, the 1939 expendi- 
tures on the principal types of relief. 

In conclusion, it may not be amiss to repeat what was expressed in the pre- 
vious year's report. As the work of the bureau progresses, it is anticipated that 
it will improve in quality, where the possibility of improvement exists, and that 
its scope will be progressively wider. It is planned as time goes on to give in- 
creased attention to the research phase of the work in which there are almost 
unlimited possibilities. Efficient and effective service to the Commissioner and 
the other policy making officials of the department, to the cities and towns and to 
all state agencies, public and private, are among our main objectives. The inter- 
change of information among the various agencies concerned with the social se- 
curity program has been, and will continue to be, encouraged by the bureau. 
Finally we wish to thank all the many cooperating individuals and agencies for 
their assistance during the year with the assurance that any facts or figures in 
our possession are always available to them. 



28 P.D. 17 

LICENSED BOARDING HOMES FOR AGED PERSONS 

G. Frank McDonald, Supervisor 

Under General Laws, chapter 121, section 22A, inserted by Acts of 1929, 
chapter 305, providing that "whoever maintains a home in which three or more 
persons over the age of sixty years, and not members of his immediate family 
are provided with care, incident to advanced age, shall be deemed to maintain a 
boarding home for aged persons/' this department is delegated to issue licenses 
and to make, alter, and amend rules and regulations for the government of such 
homes. 

In 147 cities and towns of the Commonwealth today, there are operating 606 
licensed homes for aged persons, sometimes called convalescent and rest homes. 
During the past year the department received 191 applications for licenses; 163 
of these were granted after investigation; 154 licenses were renewed, and 49 can- 
celed. Six (6) licenses were revoked because of neglect and improper treatment 
of the inmates, and 9 licensees were put on probation. 

The law providing for the regulation of these homes came into being when 
evidence was shown that abuses against the interests and well-being of the in- 
mates were being practiced. Therefore, one of the first considerations of the 
department is the honesty and reputation of the applicant in the community. Em- 
phasis is placed on the approval of the local board of public welfare and the 
recommendations of the physicians, as required by our regulations. The prem- 
ises must have the approval of the local building department and all fire hazards 
must have been removed. Accounts and information must be available to the 
inspector, and a record kept of each inmate on a register approved by the de- 
partment. 

The department is deeply concerned with the qualifications and the experience 
of the personnel who will be charged directly with the care of the patients, and 
favors those homes where the personnel includes graduate or registered nurses, 
who should be naturally kind, considerate, and sympathetic with the needs and 
desires of aged people. The consideration of gain must be secondary to that of 
kindly care. 

The Old Age Assistance Law has been responsible for the rapid mushrooming 
of these homes. Fully 50 per cent of the inmates are recipients of old age assist- 
ance. The department holds that its responsibility does not cease with the finan- 
cial security afforded by the Old Age Assistance Law, but stresses as of equal 
importance the comfort and care of the recipients. 

The department has recognized the need of further regulating these homes in 
order to provide adequate care for persons who are chronically ill or convales- 
cent. Consequently, it is proposed that all homes be classified. Homes caring 
for the chronic sick or the convalescent will be required to have the resident 
supervision of a registered nurse. Other changes to require more privacy and 
better living conditions are proposed. 

The dissimilarity in the human element involved in the personnel of these 
homes requires constant supervision. Boards of public welfare can be of im- 
measurable help by advising the department when any improper treatment to the 
inmates is observed. 

While the department does not place inmates in boarding homes, an index 
showing location and the rate charged is kept, which index is available to in- 
terested persons. 

DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 

Miss Marion A. Joyce, Director 

On March 12, 1939, Miss Winifred A. Keneran, director for the past 13 years 
and on the staff of the division for 39 years, was retired. On May 1, Miss 
Marion A. Joyce succeeded her as director. 



Pt. I. 29 

CHILDREN IN THE CARE AND CUSTODY OF THE DIVISION 





Delin- 
quent 


Way- 
ward 


Neg- 
lected 


Depend- 
ent 


Total 
Boys 


Total 
Girls 


Grand 
Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1938 . 
Received Dec. 1, 1938 to 
Nov. 30, 1939 . 

Total number during 
the year 
Discharged Dec. 1, 1938 
, to Nov. 30, 1939 . 

Number Dec. 1, 1939 


239 
146 


11 
1 


4,229 
832 


3,590 
376 


4,250 

757 


3,819 
598 


8,069 
*1,355 


385 
153 


12 
4 


5,061 
635 


3,966 
446 


5,007 
672 


4,417 
566 


*9,424 
•1,238 


232 


8 


4,426 


3,520 


4,335 


3,851 


8,186 



* 14 State Wards (12 boys and 2 girls) were recommitted as delinquent to department. 

Of the 8,186 children in the care of the division on December 1, 1939, 51% 
were between the ages of 12 and 21, and 53% were boys. According to the 
reasons for their becoming wards of the department, 

54% were neglected 



43% 

3-%' " 
.1-% " 

Of the total 



dependent 

delinquent — of which 2/3 were boys 

wayward 



59% were Catholic 
41% " Protestant 
less than 1% " Jewish 

31.3% were illegitimate 

5% were colored 
less than 4% " full orphans 

.6% were foreign-born (mostly Canadian) 
11% had foreign-born parents 
19% " one foreign-born parent 

These last 2 figures are approximate, as in some cases it is impossible to deter- 
mine accurately the birthplaces of parents. 

The total intake for the year ending November 30, 1939 was 1,341 children, of 
which 77% were under 12 years, 2% over 15 years, and 55% were boys. The 
only year for which the figure was larger was 1935, when it reached 1,374 (cf. 
1936, 1,256; 1937, 1,309; 1938, 1,335). Not counting children committed temp- 
orarily, 60% of all the family groups received during the year were families of 1 
child; 18%, families of 2 children, and 4%, families of over 5 children. 



Status of Children in Custody as of November 30, 1939 



Girls 



In families, board and clothing provided 

In families, clothing only provided 

In families, free of expense to Commonwealth 

In families, receiving wages . 

On parole with parents . 

On parole with other relatives 

In hospitals . 

In United States Service 

I In Civilian Conservation Corps 

'Married .... 

Whereabouts unknown . 



Boys 



,816 


3,343 


210 


30 


84 


295 


363 


90 


95 


138 


59 


77 


183 


165 


- 


14 


- 


161 


24 


4 


17 


18 



Total 



3,851 



4,335 



30 



P.D. 17 



Children Who Passed Out of Custody during the Year 



Discharged 

Became of age ...... 

Adopted 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys . 
Transferred to Industrial School for Boys . 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls . 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys . 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory 
Committed to Reformatory for Women 
Committed to Department of Mental Diseases 
Died 



Total 



Total number in custody during the year 



Girls 


Boys 


307 


441 ! 


149 


1131 


42 


19 


- 


13l 


- 


6 


9 


- 


_ 


21 


_ 


10 ' 


7 


- 


- 


1 


2 


-1 


43 


25: 


5 


11 



564 



660 



4,415 4,995 



Babies— On November 30, 1939, 555 of the children under care were babies 
under 3 years, visited by trained nurses at least monthly. A total of 889 babies 
were cared for in this group during the year, of whom only 1 died. 

Children 3-12 years— On November 30, 1939, 3,287 of the children under care 
were boys and girls between the ages of 3 and 12. As most children are under 12 
when received by the department, the lack of a receiving home is felt most keenly 
by the staff dealing with children of this age. During the past year, several 
rather better foster homes for temporary care have been found and opened ; how- 
ever, a few more are needed to replace some of those in use as long as new child- 
ren must be placed directly in foster homes. 

Older children — The remaining children, between 12 and 21 years of age, were 
almost evenly divided between boys and girls, with the boys outnumbering the 
girls slightly. 

A total of 701 were attending junior high school this year, and another 841 
were in high school. There were 4 boys in college, 3 girls in Teachers' College, 
1 law student and 1 seminarian ; and, besides 41 boys at the Wayside Inn School 
and 11 girls in nurses' training schools, 83 other boys and girls were receiving 
various forms of vocational education outside of high schools. 

During the year a total of 744 boys and girls were employed, including 244 
girls in housework, 161 boys in the Civilian Conservation Corps, 60 boys on 
farms, 60 boys and 33 girls in mills or factories, 46 boys in the United States 
Army, Navy and Marines, and 15 girls in offices. Of the 77 girls who were 
graduated from high school this year, 72 are working and 2 are married; 18 are 
in domestic work, saving for further education or training courses. 

Court work — The visitors to boys over 12, representing the department in all 
the district courts of the Commonwealth, attended hearings during the year on 
2,055 children charged with being neglected, the disposition of whose cases is 
shown in the following table. 

Committed to — 

Department of Public Welfare 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed .... 

Department of Public Welfare and commitment suspended 

Boards of Public Welfare . . 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston and appealed 

Placed on File 

Discharged ...... 

Dismissed 



395 
8 
3 

10 
47 
7 
69 
10 
40 



Pt. I. 31 

Continued 834 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children . . 59 

Continued and placed in* care of Department of Public Welfare . . 563 

Failed to appear 9 

Appealed from finding . 1 



Total number of cases attended . . . . ''.;'. . . 2,055 

In addition, these visitors, as the department's agents, attended hearings on 

6,061 cases of children charged with delinquency and waywardness*, the disposi- 
tion of whose cases is shown in the following table. 

Committed to — 

Lyman School for Boys 148 

Lyman School for Boys and appealed ....... 30 

Lyman School for Boys and commitment suspended . . . . 317 

Industrial School for Boys . ~ 134 

Industrial School for Boys and appealed ...... 21 

Industrial School for Boys and commitment suspended . . . 278 

Industrial School for Girls ........ 50 

Industrial School for Girls and appealed 7 

Industrial School for Girls and commitment suspended ... 22 

Department of Public Welfare 38 

Department of Public Welfare and commitment suspended . . 8 

Massachusetts Reformatory 1 

Plummer Farm School and commitment suspended .... 1 

County Training Schools 62 

County Training Schools and commitment suspended ... 33 

House of Correction . 1 

State Farm, Defective Delinquent Department, and appealed . . 2 

Filed 948 

Appealed from rinding 25 

Held for Grand Jury . . . . . . • . . . . 60 

Probation . . . 1,545 

Fined . . 24 

Continued 1,606 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare . . . . 138 

Failed to appear 40 

Discharged . r 114 

Dismissed . 408 

Total number of cases attended 6,061 

The number of children committed to us temporarily in default of surety, 
pending continuance of hearings on neglect charges against them, increased ap- 
proximately 27% this year. A total of 547 were so committed and action was 
taken upon them as follows: returned to court, 217; bailed, 2; permanently com- 
mitted, 138; pending December 1, 1939, 190; total, 547. 

*Total Way wards, 16 



32 P.D. 17 I 

The table below gives the number of temporary commitments to the depart- 
ment under the three classifications of neglected, wayward, and delinquent; and I 
the disposition of these cases: 



Disposition of Children held on Temporary Mittimi, 
pending further Order of the Court 







Received 


Perma- 




Dis- 






Pending 


during 


nently 




charged 


Pending 




Dec. 1, 


the 


Com- 




to 


Dec. 1, 




1938 


Year 


mitted 


Bailed 


Court 


1939 


Neglected . 


222 


547 


213 


2 


288 


266 


\\ a v ward . 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


Delinquent . 


33 


110 


9 


2 


75 


57 


Total 


256 


657 


222 


4 


364 


323 



Dependent Children 

As to children received as dependent this past year, the following table gives 
the picture of the applications handled by the subdivision of investigation. 

Children Families 

Applications pending December 1, 1938 .... 514 329 
Applications received December 1, 1938 to November 30, 

1939 (Involving 105 re-applications) .... 1,009 694 

Total . 1,523 1,023 

Advised only 19 

Applications withdrawn . . . . . . . ■ 52 

Assumed by relatives 311 

Assumed by private agencies ....... 59 

Assumed by public agencies 189 

Children committed General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 22: 400 

Boys . , 41 

Gir] s ... 35 76 48 

Foundlings: 3 males; 1 female 

Children received General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 38: 

Boys 151 

Girls . . . m 133 284 220 

Pending December 1, 1939 .' " 533 355 

Total "■'--. 1,523 1,023 

When, after investigation, dependent children are not accepted for care by the 
Commonwealth as the proper solution of their problems, every effort is made to 
help with planning, developing contacts with other resources, etc. When child- 
ren are accepted, every effort is made to keep as close a contact as possible with 
the families. Primarily, it is desired to preserve the family relationship so as to 
bring about rehabilitation at the earliest possible moment. There is also fos- 
tered, through payments for support and through visiting, a stronger sense of 
responsibility. This close relationship with the family results in the assignment 
to this subdivision of most investigations for the discharge of dependent children. 

There is a steadily increasing case load of out-of-state investigations, apart 
from any applications based on settlement or the moral obligation of this com- 
munity for support. They range from requests for social histories and back- 
grounds to those for investigation and recommendation allowing placement with- 
in this Commonwealth. This, of course, is granted only when the return in case 
of need may be accomplished without formality. During the year there has been 
a better understanding and desire for cooperation between similar departments in 
various states. The trend is away from a rigid adherence to the laws of settle- 



Pt. I. 33 

ment. There are already reciprocal agreements with some states and others will 
follow. 

The division collected during the year, directly from parents, the sum of $27,- 
419.51, as partial reimbursement for the support of children. This amount is 
slightly larger than our receipts from the same source last year. A total of 
$209,384.28 was received from cities and towns as reimbursement for the support 
of settled children. 

Mentally Deficient 

The unit caring for mentally deficient children has carried this year the high- 
est number of children since it was formed ten years ago. Three social workers 
have cared for 478 children who, having failed to adjust themselves satisfactorily 
to the regular foster home and school pattern of life, and having consequently 
been thoroughly examined at one of the state schools, were reported to be mor- 
ons, imbeciles, or idiots. 

Placement of these children involves the education of foster parents in the in- 
terpretation of mental deficiency of various degrees, as the happiness and the de- 
velopment of the children are absolutely dependent upon an understanding of 
their handicaps. Each child constitutes a problem, sometimes complicated by 
physical abnormalities, and sometimes by delinquency. He requires intensive 
social treatment, study of his aptitudes, and guidance, if he is to have any chance 
of becoming a happy, economically efficient member of society. 

Of the children under care on November 30, 1939, 216 were boarded in 53 fos- 
ter homes in various sections of the Commonwealth. Ail who were accepted by 
special classes in public and parochial schools attended, and a number of others 
attended regular grades up to and including the fourth grade. With proper 
supervision many of these children were absorbed into their environment. Others 
required frequent changes of homes and schools ; eventually it became obvious 
that institutional care was indicated, and commitment to a state school for the 
feebleminded was arranged through the Probate Court upon advice of the psy- 
chiatrist. A large proportion of this group is on the waiting list for admission 
to the state schools, but only a relatively small number (68 in the year just 
ended) can be accepted each year due to overcrowded conditions. 

One hundred fourteen (114) children, not placeable in the community because 
of very low grade mentality, as well as physical handicap requiring hospital care, 
are placed in institutions pending admission to state schools for the feebleminded. 
Each year it is possible to remove a few of these children to foster homes after a 
period of treatment, and a few are accepted by the state schools for the feeble- 
minded. 

Twenty-nine (29) children in this group are self-supporting and have savings 
bank accounts amounting to $2,271.30. These 29 have intelligence quotients av- 
eraging 64.5, weekly wages averaging $3.51 cash (most of their jobs include 
niaintenance), and have been on the average 1 year and 4 months in their 
present jobs. 

Adoptions of Our Wards 

Applications for children for adoption : 

Pending December 1, 1938 30 

New applications 88 

Old homes reinvestigated . . . . . . . .15 133 

Withdrawn 17 

Disapproved because of references 2 

Investigated 63 

Pending November 30, 1939 51 133 

Homes investigated : 

Approved for adoption . . 45 

Approved but withdrawn 10 

Disapproved 8 63 



p.d. ii 

The outstanding gain of the year for adopted wards is the passage of an acl 

iilating the making and recording of certificates of birth of certain abandoned 

children and foundlings— Chapter 61 of the Acts of 1939. This went into effect 

one 9, 1939. Previous to that time it was impossible for any foundling o| 

odoned child to obtain a regular birth record. This law, coupled with thJ 
enacted several years ago relative to the changing of the birth record ol 
pted children, now makes it possible for unidentified persons who have beeij 
adopted to have a regular birth certificate. 

During the current year, 26 children have been placed for adoption and 29 
chanced from a boarding to a free basis in the same home, as a preliminary step 
ird adoption. Sixty-one (61) children have been legally adopted: 42 girls 
and l l > boys, the youngest being a girl of 18 months and the oldest a boy of 20| 
years and 4 months. The reason for the latter adoption was the adopting pari 
eats' desire that this boy, who had lived in their home for years as a companion 
for their youngest son, inherit equally with their other children. 

Of the 61 adoptions, 3 children were adopted by their mothers and stepfathers,' 
3 by other relatives, 29 by their foster parents, and 26 by those with whom they 
had been placed for the purpose of adoption. 

There are now 62 children placed on trial for adoption. 
The 61 adoptions were granted in the following counties: 

tol 5 Norfolk 11 



x 
Franklin 

Hampden 

Middlesex 

Total 



8 Plymouth . . . . 1 

4 Suffolk . m . 

3 Worcester . .'.•'. . 6 

16 



61 



CHILDREN IN CARE AND CUSTODY OF THE DIVISION 

In accordance with the provisions of General Laws, ch. 121, sect. 16, the de- 
partment visited during the past year 2,264 dependent children placed in foster 
homes directly by the local boards of public welfare. 

Under the provisions of General Laws, ch. 119, sects. 14 and 28, 10 children 
were removed from undesirable boarding homes in which they had been placed 
privately. 

During the past year 523 licenses to maintain boarding homes for infants werej 
granted under the provisions of General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 2, in 110 cities and' 
towns in addition to the 454 licenses in force at the expiration of the previous 
year ; 469 expired by the one-year limitation, 2 were revoked, 59 were canceled, 
and 447 licenses permitting the boarding of 923 infants in 106 cities and towns 
remained in force November 30, 1939. Fourteen (14) applications were with-i 
drawn and 6 were refused. 

During the year the department's 5 nurses, who are visitors to our infant; 
wards, made 1,559 visits to privately boarded infants throughout the Common- 
wealth, and 1,220 visits of inspection and investigation. 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of 
Public Welfare from December 1, 1938 to November 30, 1939, under General 
Laws, ch. 119, sect. 6. 

Number of 
Reported by Infants 

Reported 

individuals 945 

Alice Chapifl Adoption Nursery, New York City ......... 945 

Cambridge 26 

Board of Public Welfare, Brockton . . . . . 2 

of Public Welfare, Danvera .... ' 1 

Public Welfare, Fall River ;!' !,•<!! ! 2 

P Mic Welfare, Gloucester . . . . 1 

I Public Welfare, Hudson '.'...'. 1 

Public Welfare, Lowell \ 2 

■ :' Public Welfare, Mansfield ....... 1 



I. 



35 



rd of Public Welfare, Middleton } 

rd of Public Welfare, Milton . 1 

rd of Public Welfare, Newton 3 

rd of Public Welfare, North Adams 3 

rd of Public Welfare, Norwood I 

rd of Public Welfare, Quincy 2 

rd of Public Welfare, Salem 1 

rd of Public Welfare, Stoneham 3 

rd of Public Welfare, Taunton 2 

rd of Public Welfare, Westminster 1 

rd of Public Welfare, Weston 1 

rd of Public Welfare, Worcester 35 

ton Children's Friend Society 70 

ckton Catholic Charities Center 10 

holic Charitable Bureau, Boston 162 

holic Charitable Bureau, Cambridge 12 

holic Children's Aid Association, Newark, New Jersey 1 

holic Welfare Bureau of Fall River 18 

Id Welfare Division, City of Boston 125 

Id Welfare House, Lynn ' 11 

Id Welfare Service, Hyannis 1 

ldren's Aid Association, Boston 83 

ldren's Heart Work Society of Maine, Portland, Maine 1 

irch Home Society, Boston 26 

nmunity Health Nurse, Fairhaven 1 

partment of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief 7 

partment of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianship ...... 546 

partment of Public Welfare, Girls' Parole Branch 1 

zabeth Lund Home, Burlington, Vermont 6 

1 River Deaconess Home 1 

nily Welfare Association, Fall River 1 

rence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 26 

rence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell 18 

;e Synagogue, Child Adoption Committee, New York City 4 

Is' Welfare Society, Worcester 2 

ild of St. Agnes, Worcester . 3 

mpden County Children's Aid Association, Holyoke 6 

mpden County Children's Aid Association, Springfield 28 

verhill Children's Aid Society 3 

ly Child Guild, Westfield . 75 

me for Destitute Catholic Children, Boston 1 

me for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield . 33 

use of Mercy, Boston 6 

stitutions Department, City of Boston 1 

ivish Child Welfare Association, Boston 12 

wish Social Service Bureau, Springfield 1 

wrence Catholic Charities Center 10 

wrence Ctiy Mission . 3 

well Catholic Charitable Bureau 17 

nn Catholic Charities Center 25 

ss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Barnstable 10 

ss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Boston 12 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Brockton 2 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Fitchburg 1 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Greenfield 6 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Lawrence 1 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Northampton .... 4 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Pittsfield 1 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Salem 11 

iss. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Taunton 4 

e>w Bedford Children's Aid Society 10 

sw England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 48 

;w England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 12 

orthampton Children's Aid Association 11 

ar Lady of Perpetual Help Infant Asylum, Manchester, New Hampshire ... 7 

ur Lady of Victory Infant Home, Lackawanna, New York 2 

i^erseers of Poor, Littleton, New Hampshire 1 

•obation Officers . 12 

bformatory for Women, Framingham 35 

bode Island Children's Friend Society, Providence 1 

obert Gould Shaw House, Boston 3 

:. Mary's Infant Asylem, Boston 27 

tlem Catholic Charities Center 16 

sters of Providence, Holyoke i 141 

sters of St. Margaret, Boston 1 

>merville Catholic Charities Center - 5 

3ence Alumni Society, New York City 2 

emporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester 4 

nited Jewish Charities, Worcester 1 

^achusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg 36 

William Street Home, Springfield '. 1 

Worcester Children's Friend Society . 23 



2,844 



The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 
(,650. Of this number 15 died and 155 were adopted. 



!Pt. I. 35 

a Board of Public Welfare, Middleton 1 

'Board of Public Welfare, Milton 1 

n Board of Public Welfare, Newton 3 

f c Board of Public Welfare, North Adams 3 

Board of Public Welfare, Norwood 1 

'Board of Public Welfare, Quincy 2 

[Board of Public Welfare, Salem 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Stoneham 3 

Board of Public Welfare, Taunton 2 

Pt Board of Public Welfare, Westminster 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Weston 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Worcester 35 

Boston Children's Friend Society 70 

'Brockton Catholic Charities Center 10 

tCatholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 162 

jCatholic Charitable Bureau, Cambridge 12 

Catholic Children's Aid Association, Newark, New Jersey 1 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of Fall River 18 

.Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 125 

."Child Welfare House, Lynn 11 

KChild Welfare Service, Hyannis 1 

Children's Aid Association, Boston 83 

Children's Heart Work Society of Maine, Portland, Maine 1 

ilChurch Home Society, Boston 26 

.Community Health Nurse, Fairhaven 1 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianship 546 

Department of Public Welfare, Girls' Parole Branch 1 

Elizabeth Lund Home, Burlington, Vermont 6 

Fall River Deaconess Home . 1 

Family Welfare Association, Fall River 1 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 26 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell 18 

Free Synagogue, Child Adoption Committee, New York City 4 

Girls' Welfare Society, Worcester 2 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester 3 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Holyoke 6 

-Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Springfield 28 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society 3 

'Holy Child Guild, Westfield 75 

Home for Destitute Catholic Children, Boston 1 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 33 

House of Mercy, Boston 6 

Institutions Department, City of Boston 1 

jjjewish Child Welfare Association, Boston 12 

Jewish Social Service Bureau, Springfield 1 

if Lawrence Catholic Charities Center 10 

Lawrence Ctiy Mission . 3 

Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau 

eLynn Catholic Charities Center 25 

.Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Barnstable 10 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Boston 12 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Brockton 2 

.Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Fitchburg 1 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Greenfield 6 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Lawrence 1 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Northampton .... 4 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Pittsfield 1 

1 Ma-s. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Salem 11 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Taunton 4 

1 New Bedford Children's Aid Society in 

[ New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 12 

Northampton Children's Aid Association 11 

I Our Lady of Perpetual Help Infant Asylum, Manchester, New Hampshire 

, Our Lady of Victory Infant Home, Lackawanna, New York 

Overseers of Poor, Littleton, New Hampshire 1 

Probation Officers 

Reformatory for Women, Framingham 35 

Rhode Island Children's Friend Society, Providence 

I Robert Gould Shaw House, Boston 

St. Mary's Infant Asylem, Boston 27 

Salem Catholic Charities Center 16 

Sifters of Providence, Holyoke 141 

Sisters of St. Margaret, Boston 

•ville Catholic Charities Center 

Spence Alumni Society, New York City 2 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester 4 

United Jewish Charities, Worcester 1 

- Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg 36 

William Street Home, Springfield 1 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 

2.844 

The actual number of infant- reported, less duplication of supervision, was 

2.650. Of this number 15 died and 155 were adopted. 



Licensed Maternity Hospitals, 1938-1939 

Licenses in force Dec. 1. 1938 (in ( )4 cities and towns) . 
Expired ......... 

Surrendered and canceled ...... 

Continuing in Eorce ....•••• 

Reissues ......••• 

New issues .....•••• 



Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1939 (in 95 cities and towns) 
Corporations ....... 

Physicians ........ 

Nurses . . . • • • 

Boards of Public Welfare . . . . ■ . 

Other persons 




There were 257 visits to hospitals for inspection and investigation of com- 
plaints. 

The returns from the questionnaires mailed to all licensees show 49,363 cases 
delivered; live births, 48,524; still-births, 1,375; deaths of mothers, 148; deaths 
of babies, 1,129. 

The licensee of each hospital is responsible for the use at every birth of the 
one per cent solution of nitrate of silver furnished by the Department of Public 
Health for the prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum. 

Each licensee is responsible for the observance of General Laws, ch. Ill, sects. 
110 and 111, relative to diseases of the eyes. 

Four (4) licenses to conduct homes for pregnant women were in force on De- 
cember 1, 1938. One (1) license expired, 1 was canceled, and 2 remained in 
force November 30, 1939. 

Investigation of Adoptions 

During the year just ended, the 14 Probate Courts of the Commonwealth re- 
quested investigation by the department of 941 adoption petitions. This number 
is 129 greater than the number of investigations made last year. There were 377 
investigations for the first six months of the year, while there were 564 for the 
last 6 months, with 127 investigations in the month of September alone. 

Not only was there a great increase in the number of adoption petitions to be 
investigated in this Commonwealth for the Probate Courts, but likewise there 
was an increase in the number of children placed in Massachusetts by institu- 
tions and departments of public welfare of other states, necessitating much addi- 
tional work in investigating homes and supervising these children during the 
trial period. 

Another increase in the work of the subdivision investigating adoptions results 
from the fact that the judges of the Probate Courts refuse to grant some adop- 
tions at the time our report of investigation is returned to the Court, and ask 
that the petitioners wait until financial conditions have improved before going 
forward with the adoption. Sometimes these waiting periods last two or more 
years and then the department is asked to make a second investigation for the 
( lourt. 

While we have seen a marked improvement in adoption work during the past 
eight and one-half years, we still feel that adoptions in Massachusetts are being 
investigated at the wrong end. The Probate Courts are becoming more and 
more convinced that our reports are helpful in deciding whether or not adoptions 
should be allowed, and we have noted with gratification the larger number of 
children who are being examined mentally and physically before the adoptions 
arc allowed ; but as long as 70%, or more, of the children are placed for adoption 
• pre -tit. the ideal situation is far from being realized in Massachusetts. The 



Pt. I. 



37 



[great step still to be taken in adoption work is to require that the placing of 
children on trial for adoption be done by social agencies. If, as is generally con- 
ceded, the finding of good foster homes even for temporary placements must be 
done by skilled workers, it would seem obvious that at least as much care should 
be taken with adoption placements. 

Statistics for the Year Ending November 30, 1939 

Investigations completed through November 30, 1938 5,589 

Pending November 30, 1938 84 

Notices received from Courts, Dec. 1, 1938 to Nov. 30, 1939 941 

6,614 

Investigations completed December 1, 1938 to November 30, 1939 888 

For adoption of LEGITIMATE children: . 269 

By relatives 216 

By persons other than relatives 52 

By relatives by adoption 1 

For adoption of ILLEGITIMATE children: 613 

*By maternal relatives 294 

By "alleged relatives" 22 

By persons other than relatives 297 

For adoption of FOUNDLINGS 6 

Investigation not required ...'.... 4 

(Pending December 1, 1939 133) 

Cases reported to Court: 888 

Investigated and approved 845 

Investigated and disapproved 43 

Notices received showing disposition by Courts 733 

Approved and granted 703 

Disapproved and dismissed 12 

Disapproved and granted 18 

*Of these, 195 petitions were by the mother and her husband. 

Distribution of Petitions According to Counties 



Middlesex 








220 


Plymouth 


39 


Suffolk . 








198 


Berkshire 


34 


Worcester 








127 


Franklin 


10 


Norfolk 








106 


Barnstable 


7 


Essex 








78 


Hampshire 


3 


Bristol . 








73 


Dukes . 


2 


Hampden 








44 


Nantucket 





Total . 












941 



Needs of the Division 

While the work of the division has increased steadily, the same cannot be said 
of the facilities for accomplishing the work. 

The offices are extremely overcrowded. The clothing room is hopelessly in- 
adequate, both as to size and location. There is not adequate provision for the 
reception of children in the State House. The present method of using the play- 
room and the doctor's office in the State House, nearby eating places for lunch- 
eons, and the nursery, results in inadequate service to children. A receiving 
home in the vicinity of the State House would seem to be the best solution, be- 
cause in addition to the service now given the children, they could be bathed be- 
fore being examined or outfitted, could be given a simple luncheon, and, in an 
emergency, could be kept overnight. 

There should be included in the next budget a request for additional money 
for the board of girls over sixteen attending high school and deserving of en- 
couragement to finish. The present policy of requiring wards to become self- 
supporting at sixteen breaks down in the cases of those who are doing well in 



3>S P.D. 17 

high school but cannot finish at that age. Board may be paid for boys because 
work cannot be found which will dovetail with high school attendance, but girls 
are required to live with families and work for their maintenance. This is, of 
course, a drain on the girl's physical strength, and undoubtedly discourages 
many girls from attempting to finish high school. 

The staff is seriously overloaded, to the extent of carrying an average of 140 
cases each. The number of visitors needs to be increased substantially, and 
similarly the numbers of supervisors and clerks need to be increased. 

Child Welfare Services 

Child Welfare Services, made possible through Federal funds appropriated 
under Part 3, Title 5 of the Social Security Act, continued in its program of 
demonstrating case work service to children in two essentially rural districts, 
i.e., Barnstable County and the southern part of Worcester County. Local in^ 
terest in these additional services has been evidenced by a constant volume of 
referrals and a willingness to consider local financial participation in the service. 

In May, 1939, the towns of Southbridge, Sturbridge, and Charlton arranged 
to take over the Child Welfare worker in that district, paying her salary in full 
from board of public welfare funds, with the state-administered Federal funds 
continuing to cover travel expense and stenographic costs. In July, the Barns- 
table County worker requested a transfer within the state department to a posi- 
tion for which she had recently qualified; and at the same time the supervisor, 
Miss Lillian Foss, retired. These changes left the service completely devoid of 
personnel. 

It was decided, on the joint advice of the Commissioner, the field consultant of 
the United States Children's Bureau, and the advisory committee to the division, 
to use this hiatus to take stock of past accomplishments and to make a study of 
child welfare needs and resources in rural areas throughout the commonwealth — 
the findings of the study to serve as a basis for planning the future Child Wel- 
fare Services' program. Starting July 12, the case work supervisor of the Bos- 
ton Children's Friend Society was borrowed for a four-to-six-months' period 
to make this survey. The major part of the study was concluded in November, 
with a preliminary report submitted in which it was recommended that the fu- 
ture function of Child Welfare Services include the following major areas: 

1. Fact finding on the state-wide child welfare problem. 

2. A continuous campaign of education, interpretation, and publicity on child 

welfare problems. 

3. Stimulation of local efforts toward adequate community organization for 

child welfare, with demonstration incidental thereto. 

4. Promotion of the fullest possible use of existing resources. 

SOCIAL SERVICE FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 
September 1, 1938— August 31, 1939 

Chapter 71, section 46A, of the General Laws, requires local school committees 
to make an annual census of the physically handicapped children in their towns ; 
and, where there are five or more such children unable to attend the regular 
public school classes, to provide special education for them. 

The Departments of Education and Public Welfare are charged with the sup- 
ervision of this census. Together they prescribe the regulations for carrying out 
the provisions of the law. The Department of Education supervises the taking 
of the census and makes the final recommendations to the local school committee 
regarding the children reported. The Department of Public Welfare makes the 
investigations and submits to the Department of Education the reports on find- 
ings from which the recommendations are made. Public Welfare also maintains 
a register of all children reported and investigated. It is with the supervision of 



|. I. 39 

Ithis work that the Subdivision of Social Service for Crippled Children is con- 
cerned. 

In reviewing the reports submitted, the following considerations are kept in 
mind: Is the handicapped child having adequate medical care; in the light of the 
nature of his handicap, is the present educational program suitable ; what more 
adequate plan of care and education can be suggested? 

In many of the cities and towns careful investigation into these considerations 
is made by the local authorities. In such instances our function is to review the 
cases with the person making the investigation and to visit only those children 
who present problems on which further advice is desired. Other cities, however, 
prefer that the investigations and recommendations be made by the state depart- 
ments on all cases reported. . 

Investigations include home visits; also, conferences with attending physi- 
cians clinics, medical social workers, local school personnel, or other interested 
private or public agencies. The very satisfactory relationship which we enjoy 
with these agencies greatly facilitates our work. We are especially appreciative 
of their cooperation in taking over the responsibility of providing for the addi- 
tional needs discovered in our investigations. 

From September 1, 1938 to August 31, 1939* census reports were received 
from eighty-three cities and towns on 4,823 physically handicapped children. 
One thousand seven hundred and sixteen (1,716) were new cases and 3,107 were 
children previously included in the census and on whom follow-up reports were 

During the year, 966 handicapped children, previously reported, were placed 
in our inactive files for the following reasons: 453 had recovered from their dis- 
abilities- 212 had reached the age of twenty-one years; 61 had died; Sb nad 
moved out of the Commonwealth; 3 had been placed in institutions for perma- 
nent care; and 201 had disabilities so slight that they no longer required special 
consideration or supervision as handicapped persons 

Of the 4 823 children reported during the year ending August SI, VJSV, S,w 
were continued in our active files. One thousand eight hundred and ninety-three 
(1 893) were crippled children and 1,964 were those suffering from rheumatic 
fever rheumatic or organic heart conditions, other chronic medical conditions, 
epilepsy, defective sight, and defective hearing. The following tables give the 
diagnoses of handicapping conditions in the order of their incidence: 

Crippled Children Children Otherwise Handicapped 

486 Rheumatic heart, chorea, and 



.J, nfa E tn f If* lyS1S 235 congenital heart conditions . 936 

fractures . .... Kidney conditions 

Osteomyelitis ' ' 92 Deaf 64 



Scoliosis ->.;-. yc Defective evesieht ... 37 

Obstetrical paralysis . ■ ■ g Othe? medial Editions includ- 

BonJand joint tuberculosis . '. \ \ ' 54 ^^Tbs'ces^^soph'agell 

Progressive muscular dystrophy . . . 40 Jffi£Li? S 'SfS 

Other orthopedic, defects _ including amputa- strictures bra ^ tumors ana 

tions; epiphysitis, synovitis and other trail- tders burns coHHs cystitis 

matic or defective bone and joint condi- &kSL„ " maUto diti's and ear 

tions ; torticollis ; Volkman's paralysis; Sf5?J|oS acute skfncondi- 

Friedreich's ataxia; transverse myelitis ; infect lons ; k f cut £ syndrome 

hydrocephalus, and amyotonia congenita . 432 ^' g] *£££ Tondftlons? *! _47S 

~L895 1.964 

L < .... 3,857 
Total . . . • 

Note- The 1,761 new cases reported during this year brings the total number of handicapped 
children on our register as of August 31, 1939, to 9,355. 

The number of children reported receiving medical attention was very gratify- 
ing. This was due largely to the increased facilities for treatment of crippled 

* As reports of handicapped children are received from local school committees throughout the 
school ye P ar it has been necessary, in the interest of statistical accuracy, to make our calendar 
year coincide more closely with the school year. 



40 P.D. 17 I] 

children under the provisions of the Social Security Act, and to the greater in- 
terest in the need for care. 

Three thousand four hundred forty-one (3,441) of the children reported re- 
ceived care as follows: 1,157 privately; 1,853 in clinics; 125 in institutions; and 
306 in hospitals or convalescent homes. 

Four hundred and one (401) children were not under active treatment. How- 
ever, many of these returned to clinics at stated intervals for re-examination and 
check-up of apparatus. Others were suffering from conditions which could not 
be corrected, and there were a few whose parents refused further care. 

Eleven (11) children had completed their treatment and there were 4 children 
the exact nature of whose care was not determined. 

The majority of our cities and towns, in which there are five or more handi- 
capped children unable to attend the regular public school classes, provide in- 
struction for such children in their own homes. However, many more handi- 
capped children are now being accepted in regular classes and are being helped 
to make a happy adjustment there. Three (3) cities provide special classes for 
crippled and cardiac children, and several towns provide transportation for 
handicapped children, making regular school attendance possible. In one city, 
through a special fund administered by the board of health, crippled children are 
transported to and from the Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed Child- 
ren in Boston. Other cities provide for the instruction of children in hospitals 
and convalescent homes as well as in their own homes. A few of the more 
handicapped crippled children are sent each year to the Massachusetts Hospital 
School, and to private institutions for the care and education of crippled 
children. 

Three thousand two hundred and seventy-one (3,271) children, reported dur- 
ing the school year 1938-1939, received education as follows: 1,662 in their own 
homes or while patients in hospitals or convalescent homes; 1,518 in regular 
public school classes ; and 91 in special schools or classes. 

Of the five hundred and eighty-six (586) children who did not receive educa- 
tion, 174 had not reached school age; 194 were beyond school age, had completed 
their schooling, or were not interested in further education; and 71 were men- 
tally unable to receive further academic instruction. The remaining 147 were 
too ill to be taught at home, were awaiting admission to appropriate institutions, 
or were those for whom suitable educational plans could not be completed for 
various reasons. 

The continuing census of handicapped children brings to our attention more 
forcibly each year the changing attitudes toward handicapped children — more 
especially crippled children — and to some of their unmet needs. 

In earlier reports we have called attention to certain cripples needing perma- 
nent custodial care for whom adequate provisions are not available. They are: 
the cerebral palsied, our second largest group of cripples; the feebleminded 
cripple; and the severely handicapped and permanently dependent cripple. As 
these are fields of care into which the Federal government has not entered 
through its grants in aid under Social Security Act, they become local welfare 
problems. A thorough study should be made of the needs of these groups so that 
an adequate program for their care can be submitted for consideration and legis- 
lative action, if necessary. As these do become welfare problems it would seem 
a legitimate function of this department to take the initiative in seeing that such 
a study is made. 

STATE BOARD OF HOUSING 

John Carroll, Chairman 
CSee also P. D. 154— Annual Report of the State Board of Housing) 






Pt. I. 41 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 
Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston) 

See P. D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE DEPARTMENT 

The following brief statements relate to the general supervision of each of the 
five institutions under the department. These reports are followed by compara- 
tive a#d more detailed consideration of the financial administration of the insti- 
tutions. Further details about the work of the various institutions may be found 
in the institution reports which are published separately. 

THE TEWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND INFIRMARY, 

TEWKSBURY 

Lawrence K. Kelley, LL.B., M.D., Superintendent 

Provides infirmary care for needy persons not chargeable for support to any 
city or town. Insane persons and those with contagious diseases are not ad- 
mitted. 

See P. D. No. 26, Annual report of the Trustees of the Tewksbury 
State Hospital and Infirmary. 

INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, 
BRIDGEWATER 

(Under the Department of Correction) 
James A. Warren, Superintendent 

Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to any 
city or town. 

See P. D. No. 24, Annual report of the State Farm. 

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 

Provides care and schooling for the crippled and deformed children of the 
Commonwealth; a school with hospital facilities. 

See P. D. No. 82, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Hospital School. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH 

Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under fif- 
teen years of age ; cottage plan. 

See P. D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 



42 



P.D. 17 Pt 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and und el 
twenty-one years of age ; only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 

[See P. D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools.] 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER 

Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under sev« 
enteen years of age at time of commitment. 

[See P. D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools.] 1 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS 

In the matter of financial supervision, the department examines and analyze^ 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institu- 
tion and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the in- 
mates. The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condi- 
tion of each institution. 



Table I. — Part I. — Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for thm 
Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1939. 



INSTITUTIONS 



Tewksbury State Hospital & 

Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 



Totals 



Normal 
Capacity 



3,100 
316 
406 
334 
270 



4,426 



Present Any 
One Time 



Largest Smallest 
Number Number 



3,098 
281 
380 
301 
257 



2,523 
142 
290 
242 
220 



4,317 



3,417 



Daily Average Number 
Present During the Year 



1939 



1938 



1937 



2,826 
252 
333 
273 
241 



256 
308 
312 
249 



2,851 
254 
370 
263 
251 



3,925 



4,015 



3,5 



Table I. — Part II. — Inventory of the Five Institutions 





Real 


AND PERSONAI 


Estate 




INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Personal 
Property 


Total j 




Acres Value 


Value i 


Tewksbury State Hospital & 

Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


916.00 $ 84,579 94 
165.72 41,806 00 
579.13 57,525 57 
968.04 34,866 80 
368.80 22,680 00 


$3,406,458 95 
775,532 54 
891,615 56 
619,889 95 
504,922 82 


$ 593,414 80 
130,336 55 
175,571 39 
159,430 77 
121,991 96 


$4,084,453 69 

947,675 09 

1,124,712 52 

844,187 52 

649,594 71 


Totals 


2,997.69 $241,458 31 


$6,228,419 82 


$1,180,745 47 


$7,650,623 6(j 



43 



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44 P.D. 17 

T \ni E 1 1 1. — P \kt 1 [.—Expenditures of the Fire Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1939 — Continued 





For Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Furnish- 
l.aiul Buildings ing and Miscel- Total 
Equipping 


rewksburj State Hospital & 

Infirmary 

LChusetts Hospital School . 
1. vina ii School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


$87,320 11 $ 675 31 $19,290 65 $107,286 07 

_ _ 4,733 07 4,733 07 

39,614 82 11,837 55 51,452 37 

— — 20,012 63 20,012 63 

— — — 5,438 74 5,438 74 


Totals 


$87,320 11 $40,290 13 $61,312 64 $188,922 88 



Table III. — Part III. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year ending 
November 30, 1939 — Concluded 



INSTITUTIONS 

Tewksbury State Hospital < 

Infirmary .... 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 

Totals .... 



Maintenance 



$1,324,138 63 
227,280 43 
290,530 33 
187,240 53 
145,170 84 



$2,174,360 76 



Special 
Purposes 



$107,286 07 

4,733 07 

51,452 37 

20,012 63 

5,438 74 



$188,922 88 



Trust 
Funds 



458 77 
112 23 



$571 00 



Total 



$1,431,424 70 
232,013 50 
342,441 47 
207,253 16 
150,721 81 



$2,363,854 64 



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46 



r.D. 1/ 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS 



Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the four county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visi- 
tation of this department, which is required to report thereon in its annual re- 
port. The names of the schools and the Superintendents are as follows : 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, James R. Tetler „ 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield '(Feeding Hills) HE Hernck 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford, J. Earl Wolton . 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston), Colonel Edgar C. Enckson 

Table I shows the trend of the population in the County Training Schools 
during the past five years. 

Table I — County Traininq Schools — Average Number in Schools during the 

years 1935-1939 



Essex County Training School . 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 



Totals 



1935 
88.5 
27.0 
138.0 
29.0 

282.5 



1936 
95.0 

32.0 
140.0 
32.0 

299.0 



1937 
82.0 
35.0 

148.0 
37.4 

302.4 



1938 
73.0 
30.0 

131.0 
28.5 

262.5 



1931 
73X 
28.! 

128.C 
25.C 

254.! 



Table II shows the numbers and the movement of the population in these u« 
stitutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1939, and also the average 
weekly per capita cost of maintenance, $13.76, subtracting all receipts from 
private sources. 

As will be seen from Table II there were 391 children in the four schools dur- 
ing 1939. The year opened with 264. In th succeeding twelve months 127 were 
admitted and 149 were discharged, leaving 242. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was 13 years, 
9 months and 8 days. Every child must be discharged, by requirements of the 
statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 



Table II. — County Training Schools — Number and Movement of Population 





Number in S 


chool During the Year 


Main- 
tenance 
of Schools 
(Average 
Weekly 
per Capita 
Cost) 


School 

• 


Whole 

Number 


On 

Jan. 1, 

1939 


Admitted 


Remain- 
Released ing on 
or Dis- Dec. 31, 
charged 1939 


Essex County Training School 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 


96 

50 

204 

41 


76 
26 
132 
30 


20 
24 
72 
11 


33 63 
22 28 
76 128 
18 23 


$10 43 
17 00 
11 70 
15 90 


Totals 


391 


264 


127 


149 242 


$13 76 



The schools are housed in splendid buildings, well furnished and equipped, and 
supervised with a high quality of personnel. 

Farms are maintained at all schools which supply a great part of the food.. 
The boys attend school, are taught farming and occupational therapy. Stress is 
placed on obedience, orderliness, and regularity, with specified times for school 
work and play. The boys are committed by the courts for truancy and petty 
offenses between the ages of 7 and 16. No court record is made. The super- 
vision is excellent, combining firmness of direction with an understanding kindli- 
ness towards the boys and their problems. 

The schools are not being utilized to the full extent of their capacity which, 
together with a necessarily large administrative staff, is causing the high per 
capita cost. 



Pt. I. 47 

SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR 
SUPPORTED BY CITIES AND TOWNS 

General Laws, chapter 117, section 3, and chapter 121, sections 7 and 16 pro- 
vide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all places 
where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the department to 
visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by the Com- 
monwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of any city 
or town. Children illegally retained in city or town infirmaries must be removed 
therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned. 



The Settled Adult Poor Provided for in Families 

Of the 384 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported in 
families on January 1, 1939 — 23 had died, and 46 had been removed before visits 
were made. The remaining 315, 179 men and 136 women, were all visited and 
reported on by the department's agents. They were supported by 112 cities and 
towns as follows : 



Abington, 4 

Adams, 1 

Agawam, 9 

Amherst, 1 

Andover, 1 

Arlington, 2 

Attleboro, 4 
| Auburn, 1 
j Barnstable, 2 
JBelchertown, 1 

Braintree, 3 

Brewster, 2 
j Bridgewater, 1 

Brookline, 10 

Cheshire, 6 

Chicopee, 1 

Clarksburg, 1 

Clinton, 9 

Colrain, 1 

Conway, 1 

Dalton, 4 

Dedham, 6 

Deerfield, 3 

Dennis, 4 

Dighton, 2 

Dover, 1 

Duxbury, 1 

East Bridgewater, 6 



Easthampton, 1 
Edgartown, 1 
Erving, 2 
Everett, 5 
Foxborough, 6 
Framingham, 5 
Franklin, 1 
Goshen, 1 
Grafton, 1 
Granby, 1 
Granville, 1 
Greenfield, 2 
Groton, 1 
Hampden, 2 
Hanover, 2 
Harvard, 1 
Hinsdale, 3 
Holden, 2 
Kingston, 2 
Lanesborough, 1 
Lee, 4 
Lenox, 7 
Leominister, 5 
Lunenburg, 1 
Maiden, 3 
Mansfield, 1 
Marshfield, 1 
Medway, 1 



Medfield. 1 
Melrose, 5 
Middleborough, 5 
Millbury, 7 
Millis, 1 
Milton, 2 
Monroe, 1 
Monson, 1 
Natick, 4 
New Salem, 2 
Newburyport, 2 
Newton, 3 
North Adams, 3 
North Attleborough, 1 
Northborough, 2 
Northfield, 3 
Norton, 2 
Norwood, 10 
Orange, 1 
Orleans, 1 
Palmer, 1 
Paxton, 1 
Pittsfield, 2 
Plainville, 1 
Plymouth, 2 
Quincy, 4 
Raynham, 5 
Reading, 3 



Rehoboth, 2 
Revere, 6 
Russell, 3 
Salem, 1 
Sherborn, 1 
Scituate, 2 
Shrewsbury, 3 
Southborough, 1 
Southwick, 1 
Springfield, 11 
Stockbridge, 4 
Stoneham, 3 
Stow, 1 
Tewksbury, 2 
Wareham, 2 
Warren, 2 
Warwick, 1 
Washington, 1 
West Springfield, 15 
Westborough, 1 
Westfield, 1 
Westford, 1 
Westminster, 1 
Weymouth, 5 
Whately, 1 
Whitman, 11 
Winthrop, 2 
Yarmouth, 2 



Their ages were as follows: 15 between 21 and 30; 13 between 30 and 40; 32 
between 40 and 50 ; 80 between 50 and 60 ; 79 between 60 and 70 ; 53 between 70 
and 80; ,35 between 80 and 90; 8 between 90 and 100. 

For their support there was paid in 1 case less than $2; in 15 cases from $2 to 
$3; in 44 cases from $3 to $4; in 255 cases (mostly old and feeble persons) the 
rate varied from $4 to $15 per week, according to the amount of care required. 

Of the whole number, 178 were reported to be in good or fairly good physical 
condition, and 284 in good or fairly good mental condition. All except 2 cases 
(which were called to the attention of the board of public welfare) were appar- 
ently receiving good care. There were 67 able to do light work either in the 
house or about the premises. In 218 cases, according to the reports, the mem- 
bers of the local board of public welfare complied with the law requiring them to 
visit these persons at least once in every six months; in 42 cases they were 
visited once during the year; in 55 cases they were not visited at all. 



Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for Outside 

Infirmaries 

As shown by the department's visitation of the 2,200 children reported by the 
authorities as fully supported outside the infirmaries on January 1, 1939, and 
July 1, 1939, 30 had been removed before visits could be made, 2 had died, and 



F.D. 17 
■1,034 boys and 868 



48 

266 were supporting themselves. The remaining 1,902- 
o-irls — were supported by 129 cities and towns as follows : 

Adams, 2 
Agawam, 4 
Amesbury, 1 

Amherst, 4 
Andover, 4 
Arlington, 6 
Athol. 2 
Attleboro, 3 
Auburn. 2 
Barnstable, 9 
Bellingham, 1 
Beverly, 12 
Billerica, 3 
Boston, 1,006 
Boylston, 1 
Braintree, 4 
Bridgewater, 2 
Brockton. 5 
Brookfield, 1" 
Brookline, 6 
Cambridge, 6 
Carver, 1 
Charlton, 6 
Chatham, 2 
Chicopee, 3 
Clinton, 3 
Conway, 1 
Dalton, 1 
Danvers, 5 
Dartmouth, 3 
Dedham, 7 
Dighton, 6 

Of the whole number, 146 were cared for and treated in hospitals and institu- 
tions. There were 1,462 who attended school, and 347 who did more or less 
work about the house. Of the whole number 1,860 were in good or fairly good 
physical condition, and 1,843 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price 
of board varied from $3 to $8 per week. These children with few exceptions, 
which have been brought to the attention of the local board of public welfare, 
were found to be well cared for. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries 

Visits were made to 125 children — 66 boys and 59 girls — reported to be cared 
for by the following cities and towns in their infirmaries : 



Dracut, 6 


Medfield, 1 


Somerville, 23 


East Longmeadow, 2 


Medford, 2 


South Hadley, 1 


Easthampton, 1 


Methuen, 2 


Southborough, 3 


Erving, 1 


Middleborough, 1 


Southbridge, 6 


Everett, 4 


Middleton, 1 


Springfield, 56 
Stoneham, 7 


Fairhaven, 2 


Milford, 2 


Falmouth, 12 


Millbury, 1 


Stoughton, 2 


Fitchburg, 8 


Millville, 1 


Sudbury, 1 


Foxborough, 1 


Montague, 11 


Sutton, 1 


Framingham, 5 


Nantucket, 2 


Swansea, 1 


Gardner, 12 


Needham, 1 


Taunton, 24 


Gloucester, 5 


New Bedford, 65 


Templeton, 1 


Grafton, 2 


Newton, 12 


Tewksbury, 2 


Granville, 2 


North Adams, 2 


Tisbury, 2 


Great Barrington, 1 


Northborough, 1 


Townsend, 1 


Greenfield, 1 


Norton, 1 


Wakefield, 3 


Groveland, 2 


Norwood, 3 


Walpole, 2 


Harwich, 1 


Peabody, 5 


Waltham, 4 


Hatfield, 1 


Pelham, 2 


Wareham, 5 


Holden, 4 


Pembroke, 1 


Watertown, 3 


Holyoke, 12 


Pittsfield, 12 


Webster, 10 


Lancaster, 1 


Plainville, 2 


Wellesley, 2 


Lawrence, 9 


Plymouth, 2 


West Springfield, 1 


Leominster, 16 


Quincy, 6 


Westfield, 2 


Lowell, 31 


Raynham, 1 


Westminster, 5 


Ludlow, 1 


Reading, 3 


Weymouth, 14 


Lunenburg, 1 


Revere, 4 


Whitman, 1 


Lynn, 47 


Rockland, 2 


Wilbraham, 3 


Maiden, 11 


Salem, 13 


Williamstown, 2 


Manchester, 1 


Saugus, 1 


Winchendon, 17 


Mansfield, 2 


Scituate, 1 


Worcester, 199 


Marblehead, 4 


Sheffield, 3 





Barnstable, 1 
Boston, 54 
Brockton, 1 
Cambridge, 8 
Easthampton, 2 
Easton, 1 



Fall River, 18 
Gardner, 6 
Haverhill, 1 
Holyoke, 3 
Lancaster, 6 
Lawrence, 1 



Maiden, 2 
New Bedford, 1 
Northbridge, 1 
Northampton, 1 
Pittsfield, 3 
Quincy, 5 



Rockland, 2 
Springfield, 4 
Sturbridge, 3 
Waltham, 1 



Of the number visited 15 are to be taken by the Division of Child Guardian- 
ship, 2 to the School of the Feebleminded, 4 are awaiting court action ; 4 are be- 
ing placed in private homes; 3 are being taken by relatives; 16 were placed in 
the infirmary temporarily because of an emergency and are now returned to their 
homes, 10 are with their mothers in the infirmary but are being removed as soon 
as their mothers can be re-established in their own homes, 41 are so defective in 
mind or body that their retention in an infirmary is desirable, 30 are under 2, or 
under 3 with their mothers, and lawful. 



The Penalty Incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for Failure to 
Make Their Returns of Poor Relief During the Month of April, 1939 

Under sections 32-35 of chapter 117 of the General Laws, the department re- 
ported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
which failed to make their returns of poor relief during the month of April, 1939, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows : Charle- 



Pt. I. 49 

mont, $7.00; Chelmsford, $1.00; Dedham, $1.00; Easton, $150.00; Freetown, 
$1.00; Gay Head, $8.00; Gosnold, $7.00; Hancock, $8.00; Hatfield, $2.00; Lin- 
coln, $2.00; Lynnfield, $9.00; Millville, $4.00; Newbury, $1.00; North Reading, 
$183.00; Northborough, $7.00; Norwell, $128.00; Paxton, $9.00; Pembroke, 
$7.00; Plainfield, $14.00; Provincetown, $4.00; Sandwich, $1.00; Savoy, $8.00; 
Sudbury, $1.00; Topsfield, $8.00; Truro, $8.00; Tyngsboro, $7.00; Wellfleet, 
$24.00. Total, $610. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT 
PASSED BY LEGISLATURE OF 1939 

Chap. 61. — An Act further regulating the making and recording of cer- 
tificates of birth of certain abandoned children and foundlings. 

Section 1. Chapter forty-six of the General Laws is hereby amended by in- 
serting after section one, as amended, the following new section: — Section 1A. 
Each town clerk shall receive or obtain and record in the record of births facts 
relative to births of abandoned children and foundlings found within the limits 
of his town and the identity of whose parents is unknown. The facts relative to 
births required by section one shall, so far as possible, be set forth in records 
subject to this section, except that the town wherein such child or foundling was 
found shall be recorded as the place of birth, and that the date recorded as the 
date of birth shall be that determined by the director of the division of child 
guardianship in the department of public welfare. Such a record shall constitute 
the birth record of such child or foundling. 

Section 2. Said chapter forty-six is hereby further amended by striking out 
section six, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — Section 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of 
a child, and every householder, within forty days after a birth in his house, shall 
cause notice thereof to be given to the clerk of the town where such child is 
born. The director of the division of child guardianship in the department of 
public welfare, within forty days after the delivery or commitment of an aban- 
doned child or foundling to said department, shall cause notice of the birth of 
such child or foundling to be given to the clerk of the town wherein such child or 
foundling was found. Every householder in whose house a death occurs and 
the oldest next of kin of a deceased person in the town where the death occurs 
shall, within five days thereafter, cause notice thereof to be given to the board of 
health, or, if the selectmen constitute such board, to the town clerk. The keeper, 
superintendent or person in charge of a house of correction, prison, reformatory, 
hospital, infirmary or other institution, public or private, which receives inmates 
from within or without the limits of the town where it is located shall, when a 
person is received, obtain a record of all the facts which would be required for 
record in the event of the death of such person, and shall, on or before the fifth 
day of each month, give notice to the town clerk of every birth and death among 
the persons under his charge during the preceding month. The facts required 
for record by section one or section one A, as the case may be, shall, so far as 
obtainable, be included in every notice given under this section. 

Section 3. Section thirteen of said chapter forty-six, as most recently 
amended by chapter ninety-seven of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty- 
eight, is hereby further amended by inserting after the word "record" in the fifth 
line, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, the following : — , or, in the case 
of an abandoned child or foundling referred to in section one A, by the director 
of the division of child guardianship in the department of public welfare, — so 
that the paragraph contained in the first to the sixth lines, as so appearing, will 
read as follows : — If the record relating to a birth, marriage or death does not 
contain all the required facts, or if it is claimed that the facts are not correctly 
stated therein, the town clerk shall receive an affidavit containing the facts re- 
quired for record, if made by a person required by law to furnish the information 
for the original record, or, in the case of an abandoned child or foundling re- 



50 P.D. 17 

ferred to in section one A, by the director of the division of child guardianship 
in the department of public welfare, or, at the discretion of the town clerk, by 
credible persons having knowledge of the case. 

Section 4. Said section thirteen of said chapter forty-six, as so amended, is 
hereby further amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph :— 

Upon the adoption of any abandoned child or foundling found within the com- 
monwealth and adopted according to the laws thereof and as to whose birth the 
facts required by section one or section one A to be recorded have not been re- 
corded or, if recorded, cannot be identified, the clerk of the town wherein such 
child or foundling was found, upon receipt of an affidavit executed by the adopt- 
ing parent or parents, as the case may be, setting forth all the materia^ facts 
known to him or them concerning said child or foundling, and of an order issued 
by the director of the division of child guardianship in the department of public 
welfare determining the date of birth of such child or foundling as nearly as may 
be, shall receive and record the facts relative to such birth as provided in said 
section one or said section one A. In addition to any other certificates or copies 
of such records authorized by law, said director may, upon application, issue cer- 
tificates setting forth the facts concerning said abandoned child or foundling ap- 
pearing in any records of said division. Approved March 11, 1939. 

Chap. 246. — An Act relative to the care of certain infants prematurely 

BORN. 

Section 1. Chapter one hundred and eleven of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section sixty-seven A, inserted by chapter three hundred 
and thirty-two of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-seven, and inserting in 
place thereof the following: — Section 67 A. If an infant is born prematurely in 
a place other than a hospital equipped to care for prematurely born infants and 
weighs five pounds or less at birth, the physician having charge of the birth of 
such infant shall forthwith give notification thereof to the board of health and 
the board of public welfare of the town wherein the infant was born, stating the 
name of the mother of such infant and the street address where the infant is at 
the time of such notification. Such notification shall be given as soon as is prac- 
ticable after such birth occurs, by telephone if possible, and in addition thereto 
such physician shall, within twenty-four hours after such birth, file a written re- 
port with such board of health in such form and giving such information as such 
board shall prescribe. In the case of such an infant prematurely born in a hospi- 
tal equipped to care for prematurely born infants, the superintendent or other 
person in charge of such hospital shall forthwith file with the board of public 
welfare of the town wherein the infant was born a written report in the form and 
giving the information required by the board of health hereunder as to premature 
births reported to said board. 

Section 2. Said chapter one hundred and eleven is hereby further amended 
by striking out section sixty-seven C, inserted by said chapter three hundred and 
thirty-two, and inserting in place thereof the following : — Section 67 C. Reason- 
able expenses for the care of a prematurely born infant, weighing five pounds or 
less at birth, in a hospital in which it is born or to which it has been removed 
shall be paid by the parent or guardian, or any other person bound by law to 
maintain such infant, if he is able to pay, otherwise by the board of public wel-j 
fare of the town wherein such infant was born, subject to the provisions of sec- 
tion twenty-four of chapter one hundred and seventeen relative to notice and re- 
quest and subject to reimbursement as hereinafter provided. If such infant has a 
legal settlement within the commonwealth, the town of settlement shall reimburse 
the town where such infant was born in like manner as if the expense of such 
care had been incurred under section fourteen of chapter one hundred and seven- 
teen. If the infant has no legal settlement in the commonwealth, the town 
wherein such infant was born shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth for the 
expense of the care of such infant, within the limits as to amount prescribed by 
section eighteen of chapter one hundred and twenty-two, upon notice to the de- 



1 Pt. I. 51 

u partment of public welfare by the board of public welfare of such town that said 
r board has incurred such expense; provided, that reimbursement shall not be 
made for any expense incurred more than five days prior to such notice. 

Approved May 25, 1939. 

Chap. 272. — An Act changing the name of the state infirmary to the 
tewksbury state hospital and infirmary. 

Section 1. The name of the State Infirmary is hereby changed to the 
Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary. 

Section 2. When used in any statute, ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation, 
the phrase "State Infirmary", or any words connoting the same, shall mean the 
Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary, unless a contrary intent clearly ap- 
pears. Approved June 8, 1939. 

Chap. 370. — An Act increasing the amounts payable by the common- 
wealth FOR THE EXPENSES OF THE FUNERAL OF CERTAIN POOR PERSONS. 

Section seventeen of chapter one hundred and seventeen of the General Laws, 
as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended by striking out, in 
the tenth line, the word "forty" and inserting in place thereof the words : — one 
hundred, — and by striking out, in the eleventh line, the word "twenty" and in- 
serting in place thereof the word : — forty, — so as to read as follows : — Section 17. 
The board of public welfare of each town shall also relieve and support and may 
employ all poor persons residing or found therein, having no lawful settlements 
within the commonwealth, until their removal to the state infirmary, and if they 
die shall decently bury them. They shall also decently bury all deceased persons 
who, although without means of support while living, did not apply for public 
relief, and all unknown persons found dead. The expense thereof may be recov- 
ered of their kindred, if any, chargeable by law for their support in the manner 
provided in this chapter; and if the expense of their burial is not paid by such 
kindred, an amount not exceeding one hundred dollars for the funeral expenses 
of each person over twelve years of age, and not exceeding forty dollars for the 
funeral expenses of each person under that age, shall be paid by the common- 
wealth subject to the provisions of section forty-two of chapter one hundred and 
twenty-one ; provided, that the board of public welfare shall file with each claim 
an affidavit of the undertaker stating the total amount of his bill, the amount re- 
ceived from the town and the amount received from all other sources and pro- 
vided, further, that if the total expense of the burial, by whomsoever incurred, 
shall exceed the sum of one hundred dollars, no payment therefor shall be made 
by the commonwealth. Approved July 19, 1939. 

Chap. 454. — An Act providing for a temporary cigarette tax, temporary 
surtaxes on divers subjects of existing taxation and a temporary in- 
crease in the inheritance tax, establishing a welfare reimbursement 
fund and relieving the burden on real estate. 

Section 1. Whenever used in this act, unless the context shall otherwise re- 
quire, the word "commissioner" shall mean the commissioner of corporations 
and taxation ; the word "person" shall mean any individual, firm, fiduciary, part- 
nership, corporation, trust or association, however formed, trustee, agency or re- 
ceiver; the word "distributor" shall mean any person who imports or causes to 
be imported cigarettes for use, distribution or sale in the commonwealth or who 
manufactures or produces cigarettes in the commonwealth; the words "licensed 
distributor" shall mean a distributor licensed under the provisions of this act; 
the word "dealer" shall mean any person other than a distributor, as defined 
herein, who is engaged in the commonwealth in the business of selling cigarettes 
and a distributor who is engaged therein in the business of selling cigarettes at 
retail ; the words "licensed dealer" shall mean a dealer licensed under the provi- 



52 P.D. 17 

sions of this act; and the words "sale" or "sell" in addition to their ordinary 
meaning shall include or apply to gifts, exchanges and barter ; "place of business" 
shall mean and include any place where cigarettes are sold or where cigarettes 
are stored or kept for the purpose of sale or consumption, including any vessel, 
vehicle, airplane, train or cigarette vending machine. 

Section 2. No person shall carry on the business of selling cigarettes in the 
commonwealth unless licensed so to do as herein provided. The commissioner 
shall upon proper application and the payment to him of the fee herein provided 
issue a license for each place of business maintained by a distributor or a dealer. 
If a distributor at any one place of business acts both as distributor and as dealer 
he shall procure a license for such place of business both as a distributor and as 
a dealer. Every machine operated or maintained for the purpose of vending cig- 
arettes shall for the purposes of this act be deemed to constitute a place of busi- 
ness, and no person shall maintain or cause to be operated such a machine with- 
out procuring a dealer's license. Each license so issued shall be prominently dis- 
played by the licensed distributor or the licensed dealer on the premises covered 
by the license, and in the case of a vending machine there shall be attached to the 
same a disc or marker to be furnished by the commissioner showing it to have 
been licensed. No person shall have in his possession a vending machine con- 
taining cigarettes for a period in excess of forty-eight hours unless there shall be 
attached to the same a disc or marker as herein provided, and any person who 
shall violate this provision shall be subject to the same fine as a person selling, 
offering for sale, or possessing with intent to sell any cigarettes without a license. 
The commissioner shall prescribe the forms of application for distributor's or 
dealer's licenses and may require therein such information as he deems necessary 
in connection with the proper administration of this act. The fee for a distribu- 
tor's license shall be twenty-five dollars and for a dealer's license shall be one 
dollar. No fee nor any portion of any fee shall be refunded by reason of re- 
linquishment or revocation of the license or for any other reason. Any person 
who shall sell, offer for sale, or possess with intent to sell any cigarettes without 
a license as provided in this section shall be fined not more than fifty dollars for 
the first offence and not less than fifty dollars nor more than two hundred dol- 
lars for each subsequent offence. Any person who shall knowingly purchase or 
possess any cigarettes not manufactured, produced or imported by a licensed dis- 
tributor shall be subject to a fine of not less than twenty-five dollars or more than 
one thousand dollars. No person, either as principal or agent, shall sell or solicit 
orders for cigarettes to be shipped, mailed or otherwise sent or brought into the 
commonwealth to any person not a licensed distributor. 

Section 3. Each license issued under section two shall expire on the thir- 
tieth day of June next succeeding the date of issuance unless sooner revoked by 
the commissioner as provided in section four or unless the business with respect 
to which such license was issued shall change ownership, or unless the holder of 
the license shall remove his business from the premises covered by the license, in 
any of which cases the holder of the license shall immediately return it to the 
commissioner. The holder of each such license on application to the commis- 
sioner accompanied by the fee prescribed in section two may annually before the 
expiration date of the license then held by him renew his license for a further 
period of one year. 

Section 4. The commissioner may revoke the license of any distributor or 
dealer for failure to comply with any provision of sections one to eighteen, in- 
clusive, of this act or if the person licensed ceases to be a distributor or dealer. 
Any person aggrieved by such revocation may apply to the commissioner for a 
hearing as provided in section thirteen and may further appeal to the appellate 
tax board as provided in section fourteen. 

Section 5. Every distributor shall keep a complete and accurate record of 
all sales of cigarettes, including the name and address of the purchaser, the place 
and date of delivery, and the quantity of cigarettes and the trade name or brand 
thereof, and a complete and accurate record of the quantity of cigarettes im- 
ported, purchased or manufactured, and the date of importation, purchase or 



j Pt. I. 53 

I manufacture. Every distributor shall also deliver with every consignment of 
j cigarettes to a purchaser within the commonwealth a written statement con- 
I taining the date of purchase, the names of the purchaser and seller, the quantity 
| of cigarettes and the trade name or brand thereof, and shall retain a duplicate 
of each such statement. Said records and said statements shall be in such form as 
the commissioner shall prescribe and shall be preserved by said distributors and 
said purchasers, respectively, and shall be offered for inspection at any time 
upon oral or written demand by the commissioner or his duly authorized agents. 
Section 6. Every distributor shall, on or before the fifteenth day of each 
month, file with the commissioner a return under oath, on a form to be furnished 
I by the commissioner, stating the number of cigarettes sold by him in the com- 
monwealth during the preceding calendar month and such return shall contain 
or be accompanied by such further information as the commissioner shall re- 
quire. At the time of filing such return, every distributor shall pay to the com- 
missioner an excise of one mill for each cigarette sold by him in- the common- 
wealth during the calendar month covered by the return. Such abatements of 
the excise provided by this act may be made by the commissioner by reason of 
bad debts, loss of cigarettes and such other causes as the commissioner may deem 
expedient. 

Section 7. If a distributor, having failed to file a return, or having filed an 
incorrect or insufficient return without reasonable excuse, fails to file an original 
or corrected return, as the case may require, within twenty days after the giving 
I of notice to him by the commissioner of his delinquency, the commissioner shall 
determine the amount due, at any time within two years after the making of the 
I earliest sale included in such determination. The distributor may appeal from 
I his decision within ten days thereof to the appellate tax board, whose decision 
shall be final. The commissioner, or, in the case of appeal, the appellate tax 
board, having made such determination, shall give notice to the delinquent dis- 
tributor of the amount determined to be due and the distributor shall forthwith, 
after the giving of such notice, pay to the commissioner the amount so deter- 
mined with interest at six per cent from the fifteenth day of the month in which 
the return is required to be made pursuant to section six. 

Section 8. A distributor who fails to file a return to the commissioner as 
required by section six, or an original or corrected return as required by section 
seven, shall forfeit to the commonwealth, and shall pay to the commissioner on 
demand the sum of five dollars for each day of delay after written notice by the 
commissioner of such failure. The commissioner may remit a part of said 
penalty. 

Section 9. Sums due to the commonwealth under sections one to eighteen, 
inclusive, of this act may be recovered by the attorney general in an action 
brought in the name of the commissioner. The commissioner may suspend the 
license of a distributor subject to this section for failure to pay such sums when 
due. The commissioner shall have the same powers and remedies with respect 
to the collection of said sums as he has with respect to the collection of income 
taxes under chapter sixty-two of the General Laws. The commissioner may re- 
quire a distributor to furnish a bond issued by a surety company licensed to do 
business in the commonwealth, in such amount as he may fix, conditioned upon 
the payment of the excise provided by said sections. 

Section 10. Any distributor or dealer who files any false return, affidavit or 
statement, or any person who violates any provision of this act for which no 
other penalty has been provided, shall be punished by a fine of not more than 
one thousand dollars or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. 
Any person other than a licensed distributor who shall knowingly sell or offer 
for sale any cigarettes upon which the excise herein imposed has not been paid 
shall be liable to the commonwealth in double the amount of the excise in an ac- 
tion of contract, provided this provision shall not apply in the case of cigarettes 
included or required to be included in a return of a licensed distributor. Any 
distributor who shall knowingly sell cigarettes and not make return of the same 



i* 



54 P.D. 17 If 

shall be liable to the commonwealth in double the amount of the excise in an ac- , -,: 
tion of contract. 

Section 11. Each dealer shall keep within the commonwealth complete and 
accurate records of all cigarettes purchased or otherwise acquired and sold. Such 
records shall be of such kind and in such form as the commissioner may pre- 
scribe and shall be safely preserved in such manner as to insure permanency and 
accessibility for inspection by the commissioner or any representative authorized 
by him. The commissioner may require by rule or regulation any dealer to make 
reports as often as he deems necessary to enable him to determine whether the 
tax required by sections one to eighteen, inclusive, of this act has been fully paid. 
The commissioner and his authorized representative may examine the books, 
papers and records of any dealer in the commonwealth, for the purpose of de- 
termining whether the excise imposed by sections one to eighteen, inclusive, of 
this act has been fully paid, and may investigate and examine the stock of cigar- 
ettes in or upon any premises where such cigarettes are possessed, stored or sold, 
for the purpose of determining whether the provisions of said sections are being 
obeyed. 

Section 12. The commissioner and any representative of the commissioner 
duly authorized to conduct any inquiry, investigation or hearing hereunder shall 
have power to administer oaths and take testimony under oath relative to the 
matter of inquiry or investigation. At any hearing ordered by the commissioner, 
the commissioner or his representative authorized to conduct such hearing and 
having authority by law to issue such process may subpoena witnesses and re- 
quire the production of books, papers and documents pertinent to such inquiry. 
No witness under subpoena authorized to be issued by the provisions of sections 
one to eighteen, inclusive, of this act shall be excused from testifying or from 
producing books or papers on the ground that such testimony or the production 
of such books or other documentary evidence would tend to incriminate him, but 
the testimony or evidence so produced shall not be used in any criminal proceed- 
ing against him. If any person shall disobey such process or, having appeared in 
obedience thereto, shall refuse to answer any pertinent question put to him by the 
commissioner or his authorized agent or to produce any books and papers pur- 
suant thereto, the commissioner or such representative may apply to the superior 
court for the county wherein the taxpayer resides or wherein the business has 
been conducted, or to any justice of said court if the same shall not be in session, 
setting forth such disobedience to process or refusal to answer, and said court or 
such justice shall cite such person to appear before said court or such justice to 
answer such question or to produce such books and papers, and, upon his re- 
fusal so to do, shall commit him to jail until he shall testify, but not for a longer 
period than sixty days. Notwithstanding the serving of the term of such com- 
mitment by any person, the commissioner may proceed in all respects with such 
inquiry and examination as if the witness had not previously been called upon 
to testify. Officers who serve subpoenas issued by the commissioner or under 
his authority and witnesses attending a hearing conducted by him hereunder 
shall receive fees and compensation at the same rates as officers and witnesses in 
the courts of the commonwealth, to be paid on vouchers of the commissioner or 
on order of the comptroller and the state treasurer shall pay said amount without 
any appropriation therefor by the general court. 

Section 13. Any person aggrieved by any action under sections one to 
eighteen, inclusive, of this act of the commissioner or his authorized representa- 
tive for which hearing is not elsewhere provided may apply to the commissioner, 
in writing, within ten days after the notice of. such action is delivered or mailed 
to him, for a hearing, setting forth the reasons why such hearing should be 
granted and the manner of relief sought. The commissioner shall consider each 
such application and may grant or deny the hearing requested. If the hearing 
be denied, the applicant shall be notified thereof; if it be granted, the commis- 
sioner shall notify the applicant of the time and place fixed for such hearing. 
After such hearing, the commissioner may make such order in the premises as 
may appear to him just and lawful and shall furnish a copy of such order to the 



'> m 



Pt. I. 55 

applicant. The commissioner may, by notice in writing, at any time, order a 
hearing on his own initiative and require the taxpayer or any other individual 
whom he believes to be in possession of information concerning any manufacture, 
importation or sale of cigarettes which have escaped taxation to appear before 
him or his duly authorized representative with any specified books of account, 
papers or other documents, for examination relative thereto. 

Section 14. Any person aggrieved because of any action or decision of the 
commissioner under the provisions of sections one to eighteen, inclusive, of this 
act may appeal therefrom within ten days after notice thereof to the appellate 
tax board. The appellant shall at the time of taking an appeal file with the ap- 
pellate tax board a bond of recognizance to the commonwealth, with surety to 
prosecute the appeal to effect and to comply with the orders and decrees of the 
board in the premises. Such appeals shall be preferred cases, to be heard, unless 
cause appears to the contrary, in priority to other cases. Said board may grant 
such relief as may be equitable and may order the state treasurer to pay the 
amount of such relief, with interest at the rate of four per cent per annum, to the 
aggrieved taxpayer. If the appeal shall have been taken without probable cause, 
the board may tax double or triple costs, as the case shall demand ; and, upon all 
such appeals which may be denied, costs may be taxed against the appellant at 
the discretion of the board, but no costs shall be taxed against the common- 
wealth. 

Section 15. The administration of this act is vested in the commissioner. 
All forms necessary and proper for the enforcement of this act shall be pre- 
scribed and furnished by the commissioner. The commissioner may prescribe 
regulations and rulings, not inconsistent with law, to carry into effect the provi- 
sions of this act, which regulations and rulings, when reasonably designed to 
carry out the intent and purpose of this act, shall be prima facie evidence of its 
proper interpretation. 

The records of any board, department, division or commission of the com- 
monwealth having information with respect to dealers in cigarettes shall, not- 
withstanding any other provision of law, be open to the inspection of the com- 
missioner for the purpose of determining the names of those subject to the tax 
imposed by sections one to eighteen, inclusive. 

Section 16. If any provision or provisions of this act are declared unconsti- 
tutional or inoperative by a final judgment, order or decree of the supreme court 
of the United States or of the supreme judicial court of the commonwealth, the 
remaining parts of said act shall not be affected thereby. 

Section 17. Every dealer who at the commencement of business on the 
effective date of this act has on hand for sale any cigarettes shall make and file 
a complete inventory thereof within twenty days thereafter, and shall pay to the 
commissioner at the time of filing such inventory a tax with respect thereto 
computed at the rate of one mill per cigarette. All provisions of this act relative 
to the collection, verification and administration of taxes applicable to distribu- 
tors shall, in so far as pertinent, be applicable to the tax herein imposed. 

Section 18. The foregoing provisions of this act shall be in effect during the 
period beginning September first, nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, and ending 
June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and forty-one and shall apply to cigarettes sold 
by distributors on and after said September first or held by dealers at the com- 
mencement of business on said date. 

Section 19. There is hereby imposed, in addition to the taxes levied under 
the provisions of chapter sixty-two of the General Laws, as appearing in the 
Tercentenary Edition, and all acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, 
taxes levied under the provisions of section nine of chapter three hundred and 
seven of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-three, as amended, and taxes 
levied under the provisions of sections thirty to sixty, inclusive, of chapter sixty- 
three of the General Laws, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, and all 
acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, an additional tax equal to fif- 
teen per cent of the taxes assessed under the provisions of said sections, acts and 
chapters in or on account of the calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine. 



56 P.D..17 

and equal to ten per cent of the taxes so assessed in or on account of the calendar 
year nineteen hundred and forty, and all provisions of law relative to the assess- 
ment, payment, collection and abatement of the said taxes shall apply to the taxes 
imposed by this section ; provided, that no tax assessed under this section in or 
on account of the year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine shall bear interest prior 
to October first of such year. 

A fiduciary shall be liable to pay a tax under this section upon income received 
and distributed by him prior to the effective date thereof only to the extent that 
such fiduciary shall, after said effective date, hold as such fiduciary funds of an 
estate or trust due to the beneficiary to whom said income was distributed. 

All taxes provided by this section which are assessed in or on account of the 
calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine shall be paid over to the Welfare 
Reimbursement Fund established by section twenty-one and those assessed in or 
on account of the calendar year nineteen hundred and forty shall be paid into 
the General Fund. 

Section 20. All property subject to a legacy and succession tax under the 
provisions of chapter sixty-five of the General Laws, as appearing in the Tercen- 
tenary Edition, and of any further amendments thereof or additions thereto, shall 
be subject to an additional tax of fifteen per cent of all taxes imposed by said 
provisions with respect to property or interests therein passing or accruing upon 
the death of persons who die in the calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
nine, and of ten per cent of all taxes imposd by said provisions with respect to 
property or interests therein passing or accruing upon the death of persons who 
die in the calendar year nineteen hundred and forty. All provisions of law rela- 
tive to the determination, certification, payment, collection and abatement of such 
legacy and succession taxes shall apply to the additional tax imposed by this sec- 
tion. All taxes provided by this section which are imposed with respect to prop- 
erty or interests therein passing or accruing upon the death of persons who die 
in the calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine shall be paid over to the 
Welfare Reimbursement Fund established by section twenty-one and those im- 
posed with respect to property or interests therein passing or accruing upon the 
death of persons who die in the calendar year nineteen hundred and forty shall 
be paid into the General Fund. 

Section 21. The proceeds of the taxes imposed by sections one to eighteen,, 
inclusive, of this act, together with all penalties, fees and fines collected under 
the provisions of said sections, and all taxes provided by section nineteen which 
are assessed in or on account of the calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
nine and all taxes provided by section twenty which are imposed with respect to 
property or interests therein passing or accruing upon the death of persons who 
die in the calendar year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine shall be paid over by 
the commissioner of corporations and taxation or the person collecting the same 
into the treasury of the commonwealth and shall be credited on the books of the 
commonwealth to a fund to be known as the Welfare Reimbursement Fund. Said 
fund, subject to appropriation, shall be used as follows: 

(1) For the expenses of administering sections one to eighteen, inclusive, of 
this act. 

(2) For payment of the expenditures of the commonwealth under section one 
hundred and sixteen of chapter one hundred and eleven, sections seventeen and 
eighteen of chapter one hundred and seventeen, section six of chapter one hun- 
dred and eighteen, section eight of chapter one hundred and eighteen a, and sec- 
tion eighteen of chapter one hundred and twenty-two, and for tuition of certain 
children under sections seven to ten, inclusive, of chapter seventy-six, for the 
care and maintenance of certain children in the care and custody of the depart- 
ment of public welfare as provided in chapter one hundred and nineteen and for 
instruction of certain children in public schools under section seven of chapter 
seventy-six. 

Section 22. All property or interests therein passing or accruing upon the 
death of persons who die during the period beginning September first, nineteen 



Pt. I. 



57 



hundred and thirty-nine and ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and forty- 
one, taxable under section one of chapter sixty-five of the General Laws, shall be 
subject to a tax at the percentage rates fixed by the following table, instead of 
the table set forth in said section one, as most recently amended by chapter two 
hundred and ninety-three of the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-three : — 



Relationship of 

Beneficiary to 

Deceased. 






Rate Per Centum of Tax on Value of 
Property or Interest. 



O 



> it 



S8S 

o 



oo 
O 



X5o 
Woo' 

O u-> 

o 






"88" 

CM 10 
G-6<9-</9- 

o 



o oo 

*88 



O 



cite* 
O 



Class A. 

Husband, wife, father, 

mother; child, adopted 

child, adoptive parent, 

grandchild . 

Class B. 
Lineal ancestor, except 
father or mother; lineal 
descendant, except child 
or grandchild; lineal de- 
scendant of adopted 
child; lineal ancestor of 
adoptive parent; wife or 
wdow of a son; husband 
of a daughter . 

Class C. 
Brother, sister, half 
brother, half-sister, neph- 
ew, niece, step-child or 
step-parent 

Class D. 
All others . 



1% 



2% 



3% 



4% 



5% 



6% 



7% 



2% 



3% 



6% 



5% 



9% 



6% 

10% 
10% 



7% 

11% 
11% 



12% 
12% 



9% 



13% 
13% 



10% 

14% 
14% 



11% 



15% 
15% 



Approved August 11, 1939. 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, State House, 

Boston, August 11, 1939. 

Honorable Frederic W. Cook, Secretary of the Commonwealth, 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: — I, Leverett Saltonstall, by virtue of and in accordance with the provi- 
sions of the Forty-eighth Amendment to the Constitution, "The Referendum II, 
Emergency Measures", do declare that in my opinion, the immediate preserva- 
tion of the public peace, health, safety, and convenience requires that the law 
passed on the eleventh day of August in the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
nine, entitled, "An Act providing for a temporary cigarette tax, temporary sur- 
taxes on divers subjects of existing taxation and a temporary increase in the in- 
heritance tax, establishing a welfare reimbursement fund and relieving the bur- 
den on real estate", should take effect forthwith, that it is an emergency law and 
that the facts constituting the emergency are as follows : 

For the reason of the immediate necessity for new and additional revenue with 
which to carry on the services the Commonwealth is rendering for the benefit of 
the citizens of Massachusetts and in order to cover the provisions of the law it- 
self which states that these taxes shall become effective on September first of the 
:urrent year. 

Leverett Saltonstall, 
Governor of the Commonwealth. 



58 P.D. 17 

Office of the Secretary, Boston, August 11, 1939. 

I hereby certify that the accompanying statement was filed in this office by 
His Excellency the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts at twelve 
o'clock and forty minutes, p.m., on the above date, and in accordance with Ar- 
ticle Forty-eight of the Amendments to the Constitution said chapter takes effect 
forthwith, being chapter four hundred and fifty-four of the acts of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirtv-nine. 

F. W. Cook, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

Chap. 487. — An Act further defining the term dependent child under 
the law providing aid to dependent children. 

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the imme- 
diate preservation of the public convenience. 

Section one of chapter one hundred and eighteen of the General Laws, as ap- 
pearing in section one of chapter four hundred and thirteen of the acts of nine- 
teen hundred and thirty-six, is hereby amended by inserting after the word "six- 
teen" in the fourth line the following : — , or under the age of eighteen if found to 
be regularly attending school, — so as to read as follows: — Section 1. The fol- 
lowing words and phrases as used in this chapter, unless the context otherwise 
requires, shall have the following meanings : — 

"Dependent child", a child under the age of sixteen, or under the age of eight- 
een if found to be regularly attending school, who has been deprived of parental 
support or care by reason of the death, continued absence from home or physical 
or mental incapacity of a parent, and who is living with his father, mother, 
grandfather, grandmother, brother, sister, stepfather, stepmother, stepbrother, ; 
stepsister, uncle or aunt in a place of residence maintained by one or more of 
such relatives as his or their own home, whether or not they or any of them have 
a settlement within the commonwealth. 

"Aid to dependent children", money payments with respect to a dependent 
child or dependent children. 

"Department", the department of public welfare. 

"Parent" shall include any relative described in the paragraph of this section 
defining "Dependent child", in respect to dependent children in his or her care 
or custody. Approved August 12, 1939. 



Chap. 65. — Resolve providing for a study and investigation by a special 
unpaid commission relative to the liberalization and administration 
of the old age assistance law, so called, and related matters. 

Resolved, That a special unpaid commission, to consist of one member of the 
senate to be designated by the president thereof, three members of the house of 
representatives to be designated by the speaker thereof, and three persons to be 
appointed by the governor, is hereby established for the purpose of making a 
study and investigation of the old age assistance law, so called, to determine the 
advisability or necessity of revising and liberalizing said law, particularly with 
reference to eligibility requirements as to age, amount of payments, resources oi 
applicants, support of aged persons by their children, separation of boards oi 
public welfare from bureaus of old age assistance, benefits to crippled and totally 
disabled persons, irrespective of age, and related matters. The commission snal 1 
consider the subject matter of so much of the governor's address (current senate 
document numbered one) as relates to the liberalization and administration oi 
said law; also the subject matter of current senate documents numbered seven- 
teen, eighteen, nineteen, forty-six, sixty-three, sixty-four, sixty-five, one hundrec 
and two, one hundred and sixty-seven, one hundred and sixty-eight, one hundrec 
and sixty-nine, two hundred and fifty-one, two hundred and fifty-two, three hun 



Pt. I. 59 

dred and thirty-eight, three hundred and thirty-nine and three hundred and forty, 
and of current house documents ninety, one hundred and sixty-one, one hundred 
and sixty-two, one hundred and sixty-three, one hundred and sixty-four, one 
hundred and sixty-five, one hundred and sixty-six, one hundred and sixty-seven, 
two hundred and one, two hundred and thirty-nine, two hundred and eighty-four, 
three hundred and forty-five, three hundred and forty-six, three hundred and 
forty-seven, three hundred and fifty-three, three hundred and ninety-six, four 
hundred and seventy-six, four hundred and seventy-seven, four hundred and 
eighty- three, five hundred and forty-three, five hundred and forty-four, five hun- 
dred and fifty-seven, six hundred and fifty-nine, six hundred and sixty, six hun- 
dred and sixty-one, six hundred and sixty-two, six hundred and seventy-five, 
seven hundred and fifty-four, eight hundred and forty-seven, nine hundred and 
seventy-six, nine hundred and seventy-nine, nine hundred and eighty, eleven 
hundred and fifteen, eleven hundred and sixteen, eleven hundred and seventeen, 
eleven hundred and eighteen, eleven hundred and nineteen, eleven hun- 
dred and twenty, eleven hundred and twenty-one, twelve hundred and fifty- 
eight, twelve hundred and fifty-nine, twelve hundred and sixty, twelve hundred 
and sixty-one, twelve hundred and sixty-two, twelve hundred and sixty- 
four, thirteen hundred and forty-four, thirteen hundred and eighty-six, 
thirteen hundred and eighty-eight, thirteen hundred and eighty-nine, thirteen 
hundred and ninety, thirteen hundred and ninety-three, thirteen hundred and 
ninety-four, sixteen hundred and eighty-nine, sixteen hundred and ninety, sixteen 
hundred and ninety-one, sixteen hundred and ninety-two, sixteen hundred and 
ninety-four, sixteen hundred and ninety-five, sixteen hundred and ninety-six, six- 
teen hundred and ninety-seven, sixteen hundred and ninety-eight, seventeen hun- 
dred and eight, eighteen hundred and twenty, eighteen hundred and twenty-one, 
eighteen hundred and twenty-two, eighteen hundred and twenty-three, eighteen 
hundred and eighty four, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, eighteen hundred and 
eighty-six and eighteen hundred and ninety-two. 

Said commission shall be provided with quarters in the state house or else- 
where, may hold hearings, may require by summons the attendance and testi- 
mony of witnesses and the production of books and papers ; and may expend for 
necessary assistance and expenses such sums not exceeding, in the aggregate, 
two thousand dollars, as may hereafter be appropriated therefor. The commis- 
sion shall report to the general court the result of its investigations and its rec- 
ommendations, if any, together with drafts of legislation necessary to carry its 
recommendations into effect, by filing one or more reports with the clerk of the 
senate at such time or times as the commission may elect; provided, that the 
commission shall so file its final report not later than December first, nineteen 
hundred and forty. Approved August 12, 1939. 



60 



P.D. 17 ? 



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62 P.D. 17 

PART II 

PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS 
Arthur G. Rotch, Commissioner 

Supervisors 
Miss Florence G. Dickson Miss Alice M. McIntire 

Miss Mary C. Robinson 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while the second and 
third call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages of 
this part of the report the functions of the department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the number of 
persons aided by the various charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 180, section 6, provides that the department 
shall investigate, give a public hearing, and report its findings to the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth, in all cases of charitable organizations which seek a cer- 
tificate of incorporation. During the year ending November 30, 1939, 56 appli- 
cations for charters have been referred under the provisions of this statute. The 
department has completed its investigation, given hearings, and reported on 41 
applications, including 6 received prior to the beginning of the year. 

Action has been taken by the Secretary of the Commonwealth on 41 applica- 
tions as listed below. Thirty-three (33) of these petitions have been granted 
and charters issued, while 8 have been refused. 

American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc. 

Animal Rescue League of Fitchburg, Inc. 

Armenian Relief Corps, Inc. 

Associate Nursery School, Inc. 

Benevolent Karystion Society of Boston "Kotsikas" Inc. 

Boston Committee for Refugees 

Breezy Meadows Camp, Inc. 

Canadian Club of Lynn, Inc. 

Catholic Junior League of Chicopee 

Child Guidance Clinic of Springfield, Inc. 

Columbus Club Inc. of Arlington, Massachusetts 

Daughters of the British Empire in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, The 
Deaconess Club Inc. 

El-Tekatuf El-Shalfany, Inc., of Boston 

Feminine Catholic Association SS. Cosmo E Damiano of Cambridge and Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts 

Friends of the Boston Evening Clinic & Hospital, Inc. 

Friends of the Handicapped, Inc. 

Girl Scout Council of Greater Lawrence, Incorporated 

Greek Ladies Society of Boston "Proodos" 

Health Service, Inc. 

Hull Italian-American Associates, Inc. 

Jeshivath Bachurim Torah Weyirah and Orphans Kitchen, Inc. 

Jewish Child Adoption Bureau, Inc. 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Polona Progressive Association 

Lincoln Social Club of East Boston 

Maimonides Educational Institute, Inc. 

Maiden Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association 

Massachusetts Knights of Pythias Kiddie Kamp Corporation 

Olita Relief Association 

Oxford District Nursing Association, Inc. 

Polish-American Veterans Club, Incorporated 

Puritan Charitable Foundation, Inc. 

Rotary Club Education Fund of Framingham 

Sargent Improvement Club of Methuen 

Somerville War Veterans Political Association 

Springfield Hebrew Institute, The 

Springfield Post No. 26, Inc., Jewish War Veterans of United States 

United Prison Association of Massachusetts 

Veterans' Home & Welfare Association, Inc. 

Wayland-Cochituate Legion Building Association, Inc. 

Wollaston Post A. L. Building & Welfare Association, Inc. 



Pt. II. ' 63 

Supervision of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 121, section 7, requires the Department of 
Public Welfare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corpora- 
tion, to make annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

During the past year supervision of incorporated charities has been continued 
through visits and conferences by the supervisors. There have been 167 inspec- 
tions involving many consultations and visits to institutions. 

There have been 865 inquiries regarding particular charities and general mat- 
ters related to the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of 
Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts 

Of the 1,385 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1,939, 132 are homes for the aged; 145 are hospitals, sanatoria and other 
institutions for the sick ; 145 are nursing societies and other health agencies ; 272 
are agencies giving family service and relief; 131 are child-serving agencies; 
179 are youth agencies; 88 are settlements and neighborhood centres; and 101 
are federations, foundations, and community chests. The remaining 192 form a 
miscellaneous group chiefly civic or eleemosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 180, section 12, provides that a charitable 
corporation incorporated within this Commonwealth must make to this depart- 
ment an annual financial return on or before the first day of November in each 
year, and further provides that if any corporation fails for two successive years 
to make the report, the Supreme Court may decree its dissolution.- Figures from 
the financial reports of corporations for the last year are given on the following 
pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alphabetical order under each 
town. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1939 showed the total property, real and 
personal, of all these charities to be $391,924,445. Subscriptions and donations 
amounted to $22,441,370. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from benefi- 
ciaries, were $28,619,665. Receipts from interest and dividends on investments 
totalled $9,523,073. Legacies were received to the amount of $6,689,657. Total 
current receipts were $61,752,458. Total current expenditures were $59,957,845. 
Total paid for salaries and wages, $24,322,167. 

Corporations Dissolved 

In 1939, 15 charters were dissolved by the General Court (Acts 1939, chap. 
179). The list follows :— 

Abington Young Men's Christian Association 

American Youth Council of Westfield, Incorporated 

Arleen Grandberg Memorial 

Employees Benevolent Association, Inc. 

French Women's Christian Association 

Massachusetts Rural Communities, Inc. 

North End Diet Kitchen, The 

Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc. . 

White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses of Holyoke, Mass. 

Winchester Unemployment Relief Committee, Inc. 

Women's Educational and Industrial Union, The (1880) 

Worcester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, The 

Young Men's Educational Aid Association, The 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Newton 

Registration of Foreign Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 180, section 12A, requires a charitable corp- 
oration incorporated elsewhere than in Massachusetts, which engages in chari- 
table work or raises funds within the Commonwealth, to file with the department 



o4 P.D. 17 I 

(1) a true copy of its charter or certificate of incorporation, (2) a true copy of 
its constitution and by-laws, and (3) an annual report on or before November 
first. Approximately 50 foreign corporations are complying with the law. 

No Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organiza- 
tion or agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any 
such society. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume 
do not mean approval ; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of 
conditions calling for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in 
using the fact of inspection in such manner as to lead the public to believe that 
the department approves or in any sense commends its work. 



00 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva 

■ f 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Abington 

1 Abington Visiting Nurse Association Inc. . . $842 

2 County Committee of Young Men's Christian As- 

sociations of Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 
Incorporated, The 1 

Acushnet 

3 Acushnet Hospital Association (36 beds) . . . 46,514 

4 Acushnet Instructive Nursing Association, The . 7 

Adams 

5 Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) (See also 

Holyoke) 125,096 

I Agawam 

6 Societa Sant' Antonio Di North Agawam, Inc. . 261 

Amesbury 

7 Amesbury and Salisbury Home for Aged Women 140,207 

8 Amesbury Hospital Association, The (not in oper- 

ation) 11,198 

9 Ladies Charitable Society of Amesbury . . . 13,852 

Amherst 

10 Amherst Boys Club, Inc 17,366 

11 Amherst Home for Aged Women, The . . . 124,652 

12 Wilbur H. H. Ward Educational Trust, Incorpor- 

ated, The 123,619 

Andover 

13 Andover Guild, The 6,198 

14 Andover Home for Aged People . ... . . 138,518 

Arlington 

15 Arlington Boys' Club, Inc 139 

16 Arlington Community Chest, Inc 9,401 

17 Arlington Girl Scouts, Inc 1,519 

18 Arlington Visiting Nursing Association Inc., The* 

19 Order of St. Anne (St. John's House for Chil- 

dren) 168,198 

20 Sachem Council, Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America 4,974 
21. Southern Middlesex Health Association . . - 51,474 

22 Symmes Arlington Hospital (65 beds) . . . 295,143 

Athol 

23 Athol Memorial Hospital (not in operation) . . 10,570 

24 Athol Young Men's Christian Association, The . 90,286 

Attleboro 

25 Attleboro Community Chest, Inc., The, 29 Park St. — 

26 Attleborough Hospital, The, 211 Park St. (109 

beds) 933,932 

27 Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc., The, 

47 Bank St 19,399 

28 Attleboro Young Mens Christian Association, The, 

63 North Main St \ 129,688 

29 Family Welfare Association of Attleboro, Mass., 

Inc., 7 Park St 3,726 

30 John Daggett-Frances A. Crandall Home for Aged 

Women, 550 North Main St 84,864 

31 New England Deaconess Association (Attleboro 

Springs), 961 Park St __ 

32 New England District of the Christian and Mis- 

sionary Alliance Inc.2 19,316 

33 S. D. A. Laymans Benevolent Association of New 

England, Inc 56,078 

Auburn 

34 Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The . 936 

35 Skogsblomman Society, Inc 2 188 

Avon 

36 Lutheran Children's Home, Inc 104,327 

Ayer 

37 Community Memorial Hospital (22 beds) . . 89,230 

38 Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc., 

The, (See also Maiden) 9,139 

— None. i No report. 2 Report for 1 1 months. 



$970 



95 



310 

34 
43 



2,489 
10 



50 



7,166 



6,578 

3,070 
3,165 



$233 



29,296 
1,829 



20,796 



1,774 



30 



4,627 


208 


107 


— 


4,912 


542 


33,071 


— 


1,879 


1,134 


9^744 


18,350 


10,694 


6,660 


8,642 


10,762 


1,197 


95,609 



7,111 



4,930 


— 


4,185 


82,866 


2,731 


942 


9,939 


9,074 


5,796 


804 


300 


1,754 


3,597 


1,446 


150 


9,322 


123 
150 


855 
106 



2,523 

23,336 

4,547 



3 Restricted to capital. 



II. 


















67 


iritable Corporations 
















egacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


>ervice or Relief 


Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




— 


$1,380 


$1,613 


$707 


2 


2,1055 


1,0755 


— 


— 


2 


1 
2 


— 


29,661 
1,829 


26,894 
1,824 


10,460 
1,790 


24 
3 


657 
1,8515 


12 
9155 


— 


— 


1 


3 

4 


$200 


20,996 


20,572 


3,205 


12 


703 


25 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


310 


99 


— 


— 


60 


60 


— 


— 


1 


6 


(2003} 
1600 J 


6,287 


4,624 


1,808 


4 


10 


— 


— 


— 





7 


— 


258 
336 


190 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14 


— 


— 


8 
9 


— 


2,744 
3,655 


2,896 
3,430 


1,747 
1,014 


2 
3 


6 


— 


— 


236 


— 


10 
11 


— 


4,367 


4,439 


— 


— 


58 


58 


— 


— 


— 


12 


7,500 


4,964 
12,125 


4,830 
5,418 


3,325 
2,125 


6 

5 


6 


— 


— 


576 


— 


13 
14 


— 


5,454 

33,071 

3,013 


2,826 

26,813 

2,953 


1,917 
1,434 
1,260 


2 
1 
2 


— 


— 


— 


612 
730 


7 


15 
16 
17 
18 


3,400 
3,6003 


28,930 
19,656 
19,543 
97,114 


32,190 
16,339 
17,800 
93,105 


3,737 

6,297 

5,933 

29,633 


6 

4 

31 

58 


115 

128 
3,421 


26 
142 


— 


2,213 


— 


19 

20 
21 
22 


— 


186 
14,278 


14,286 


7,826 


6 


— 


— 


— 


1,200 


— 


23 
24 


— 


34,930 


34,935 


452 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


25 


— 


101,966 


104,888 


55,004 


100 


2,298 


79 


— 


— 


— 


26 


— 


3,730 


4,068 


2,611 


3 


— 


— 


— 


355 


— 


27 


— 


19,953 


19,784 


9,329 


16 


— 


— 


— 


850 


22 


28 


— 


6,657 


7,070 


2,632 


2 


— 


— 


115 


— 


— 


29 


— 


3,706 


4,836 


2,005 


4 


12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 
31 

32 


— 


5,044 


4,217 


— 


— 


4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9,472 


11,010 


3,925 


_4 


56 


1 


— 


— 


— 


33 


— 


993 
256 


999 
216 


261 


1 


1,2785 


4385 


2 


— 


— 


34 
35 


— 


9,290 


10,056 


3,724 


9 


37 


19 


— 


— 


— 


36 


— 


26,407 


27,007 


13,134 


12 


682 


1 


— 


— 


— 


37 


— 


7,712 


6,181 


2,785 


5 


25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


38 



4 Not stated. 



5 Visits. 



P.D. ] 
Abstracts of Reports of Priva, 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Barnstable 

Cape Cod Council Boy Scouts of America, Inc. 

Cape Cod Educational Foundation 1 

Cape Cod 4-H Camp Corporation .... 

Cape Cod Hospital (65 beds) 

District Nursing Association of Barnstable, Yar- 
mouth and Dennis, The . . . 

Hyannis Normal Students Permanent Loan Fund 
Company, The ....... 



Barre 



7 Stetson Home 



Bedford 

8 Catholic Foreign Mission Society of Afnerica, Inc. . 

Belmont 

9 Belmont Community Nursing Association 

10 Belmont Relief Society, Inc. . 

11 Jewish Community Center of Belmont and Water- 

town, Inc. ........ 

12 McLean Hospital Nurses' Alumni Association 

Berlin 

13 Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Destitute 

Children, Incorporated, The .... 

Beverly 

14 Beverly Female Charitable Society, The 

15 Beverly Fuel Society, 234 Cabot St. . 

16 Beverly Hebrew Community Center, Inc., 37 Bow St.l 

Beverly Hospital Corporation, Herrick St. (121 beds) 
Beverly School for the Deaf, 6 Echo Ave. 
Country Week Association ..... 
Essex County Health Association, Inc., 222 Cabot St. 
Fisher Charitable Society, 175 Cabot St. 
Old Ladies Home Society, 78 Lothrop St. . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Beverly, 
Mass., The, 235 Cabot St 

Billerica 
Pines Community Association, The 

Boston 

A. C. Ratshesky Foundation, 30 Court St.l . 

Adams Nervine Asylum, 990 Centre St., Jamaica 
Plain (36 beds) 

Agoos Family Charity Fund, The2 

Ahepa Charitable and Educational Corporation* . 

Alumnae Association of the School of Nursing of 
the New England Deaconess Hospital, Incorpor- 
ated, 25 Deaconess Rd. ..... 

Alumni Mutual Fund of Boston University School 
of Theology, Inc., The, 72 Mt. Vernon St. 

American Humane Education Society, The, 180 
Longwood Ave. ....... 

American Invalid Aid Society, 2 Park Square 

American Ramabai Association, The 

American Unitarian Association, 25 Beacon St. . 
American Women's Overseas League of New Eng- 
land, Inc. ....... 



Animal Rescue League of Boston, 51 Carver St. . 

Annapolier Association Inc. . . . 

Araner Society, Inc.l ...... 

Armenian Women's Welfare Association, Inc., 
190 Heacon St 

Armstrong-Hemenway Foundation, 43 Rutland Sq.9 

Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc., 8 Fay- 
ette St 

Associated Jewish Centers Camp, Inc., The, 7 
Water St.5 .■ * . 

Associated Jewish Philanthropies, Inc., 333 Wash- 
ington St. . 

Associated Young Men's and Young Women's 
Hebrew Associations of New England, Inc., 7 
Water St . 



$3,869 



3,254 



6,050 

27,206 

( 

188,302 

241 



$3,851 



236 

6,985 

11,883 

589,060 

896 



$866 



51 



206,865 

157,543 

120 


77 


22,398 
489 


10,832 


1,563 


114 


41,795 


185 


4,025 


441,110 

6,402 

297 


200 

1,752 

70 


2,036 


8,768,360 


43,731 


25 


38 


134 


8 


1,433,227 
337 


6,366 

504 


36,157 



793 

248 
2,292 

225 

1,326 



$72 



7,232 
457,198 


480 
19,440 


117,313 


1,262 


5,800 


4,502 


3,887 


153 


25,628 


80 


215 


304 


252,519 


380 


1,877 


11,463 


93,659 


11,493 


— 


— 


23,172 
6,853 


2,092 
5,348 


2,551 
1,077 


402 
126 


1,059 
5,795 


254 
891 


1,340 
156 


4 
284 


5,000 


225 


— 


— 


19,733 
28,879 


267 


158 


460 
1,210 


1,534,824 

201,014 

547 

3,247 

69,963 

260,934 


21,349 

847 

5.200 

15,925 
250 
239 


193,533 

59,501 

23 

6,191 

2,808 


39,26% 
1.904 

15 

3,047* 

10,596 


249,213 


7,227 


12,555 


1,566 



1,142 



285,313 



50,023 



30 



5,592 



-None. i No report. 2 Report for 11 months. 3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Report for 13 months. 



II. 

haritable Corporations — Continued. 



69 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 





Service or Relief Given To 


Paid 












Officers 






Families 






and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Organi- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


zations 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 







50 



4,000 



225 



$4,791 



$4,924 



$2,500 



480 
138,528 


234 
139,902 


59,622 


8,543 


8,795 


5,838 


600 


732 


— 


13,720 


15,480 


6,946 


29,940 


9,877 


1,146 


15,045 
6,552 


3,961 

5,593 


3,295 
2,300 


1,598 
1,332 


1,038 
882 


532 



73 


5,415 


7 


4 


4,62710 


46110 


— 


17 


17 



21 



19 



4,23110 1,24010 
389 380 



30 



30 



225 



225 



21,399 



69 



21,941 



123 



11,372 



17 



2,223 



3,1! 



1,080 



— 555 



— 


885 


1,033 


— 


— 


— 


— 


87 


— 


1,210 


. 1,011 


93 


3 


— 


— 


64 


0,0003} 
7,927 J 
















302,079 


269,899 


121,129 


192 


5,471 


682 


— 


500 


62,753 


61,436 


34,308 


37 


91 


91 


— 


— 


5,223 


4,770 


1,861 


21 


198 


198 


— 


— 


22,132 


23,338 


6,147 


5 


79 


— 


— 


1,460 


4,757 


2,502 


600 


2 


41 


41 


71 


7,576 


21,225 


9,797 


3,613 


6 


10 


— 


— 



577 



54,628 

7,746 

566 


50,904 

8,042 

445 


26,440 


42 


200 


165 


11 


1,677 


1,739 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,352 


3,436 


— 


— 


104 


104 


— 


24,997 
1,889 

203 


23,262 

2,625 

342 


13,891 
1,049 


14 
2 


123 
2,000 


123 
2,000 


14 


365,453 


360,282 


44,435 


39 


— 


— 


— 


142 


104 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


122,098 
504 


116,033 
166 


67,213 


56 


129,3908 


128,6608 


4 


1,059 


586 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


7,459 


7,272 


4,852 


6 


16,4077 


16,3587 


3 


14,175 


15,984 


5,468 


45 


191 


— 


— 


594,877 


577,865 


33,725 


37 


_ 


— 


— 



16 



37 44 



Report for 14 months. 6 Not stated. 7 Attendance. 8 Animals. 9 Report not due. io visits. 



p.d. i; 

Abstracts of Reports of Privat 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 

Association for Independent Co-operative Living, 
11 Nassau St. . . . . 

Association for the Work of Mercy in the Diocese 
of Massachusetts, The, 244 Townsend St., Rox- 
bury ......... 

Association of Andranovites Saint Nicholas, Inc. 

Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 
for Works of Mercy, The, 670 Baker St., West 
Roxbury ........ 

Association of the House of the Good Samaritan, 
25 Binney St. (81 beds) . 

Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and Polish 
Jewish Central Committee at Jerusalem 

Baby Hygiene Association, 137 Newbury St. 

Baikar Association Inc., 296^2 Shawmut Ave. 

Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc., The, 35 
Temple St. . . .... 

Beethoven Memorial Foundation, Incorporated 

Belgian Netherland American Social and Benevo- 
lent Club Inc. . . . . . . 

Beneficent Society of the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music, The, 290 Huntington Ave. . 

Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches 

Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches 
(North End Union) 20 Parmenter St. 

Benoth Israel Sheltering Home, 24 Province St. . 

Bethany Union for Young Women, The, 14 Wor- 
cester St. ........ 

Beth El Free Loan Society of Dorchester, Inc., 
The, 94 Fowler St., Dorchester 

Beth Israel Hospital Association, The, 330 Brook- 
line Ave. (220 beds) 

Beth Israel Hospital Women's Auxiliary, Inc. 

Board of Ministerial Aid, The, 14 Beacon St. 

Boston and Maine Railroad Employees' Fund, 
Incorporated, 150 Causeway St. 

Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society, 
15 Ashburton Place ...... 

Boston Baptist Social Union, 15 Ashburton Place 

Boston Branch of the Christian and Missionary 
Alliance, Inc., 30 Kenilworth St., Roxbury 

Boston Children's Aid Society, 41 Mt. Vernon St. 
Boston Children's Friend Society, 45 Rutland St. 
Boston City Hospital, The, 818 Harrison Ave. 

(2,965 beds) 

Boston Community Centre, Inc., of the Volunteers 

of America, 25 Hanover St. ... . 

Boston Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

38 Chauncy St. . 
Boston Council of Girl Scouts, 280 Dartmouth St. 
Boston Dispensary, The, 25 Bennet St. (20 beds) 
Boston Educational Association for Deaf Children 
Boston Episcopal Charitable Society, The 
Boston Evening Clinic and Hospital, 452 Beacon St. 
Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 
Boston Floating Hospital, The, 20 Ash St. (50 beds) 
Boston Guild for the Hard of Hearing, 283 Com- 
monwealth Ave. ...... 

Boston Health League, Incorporated, 80 Federal St. 
Boston Home for Incurables, The, 2049 Dorchester 

Ave., Dorchester ...... 

Boston Industrial Home, 17 Davis St. . 

Boston Ladies Bethel Society, 332 Hanover St. . 

Boston Lakeshore Home ..... 

Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society 

Boston Legal Aid Society, The, 16A Ashburton 

Place 

Boston Lying-in Hospital, 221 Longwood ' Ave.' 

(204 beds) 
Boston Marine Society, The, 88 Broad St. . ! 

Boston Music School Settlement, Inc., The, 41 

Allen St . 

Boston Nursery for Blind Babies, 147 South 

Huntington Ave. ...... 

Boston Pilots' Relief Society, 69 Long Wharf 
Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Managers 

of, 1 1 North Square ...... 



$38,143 


$39 


$16,426 


$8 


82,164 
103 


10,458 


2,368 


2,278 

2 


125,097 


2,447 


4,262 


2,329 


1,238,739 


36,723 


10,913 


38,961 


34 
94,288 
30,997 


7,918 


2,423 
23,827 


4,084i 


45,002 
5 


1,700 


9,889 


— 


4,690 


797 


362 


59 


21,772 
837,333 


303 
2,068 


663 


699 

26,673 


24,963 
50,000 


22,758 
1,472 


1,420 


974 


61,079 


1,088 


10,843 


1,669 


10,969 


936 


33,314 


— 


3,031,129 

57,032 

134,381 


269,935 
21,063 
18,523 


374,716 

15,383 

29 


2,693 

540 

5,156 


6,256 


— 


— 


1 


185,430 
1,341,072 


26,484 
2,900 


2,011 
4,226 


1,322 
99,475 


49,175 


12,800 


— 


250 


839,214 
502,978 


16,059 
19,974 


14,520 


41,625 
19,984 


16,092,896 


3,888,804 


427,099 


2,675 


— 


5 


15,808 


— 


162,683 

54,777 

1,466,425 

3,113 

202,086 

19,706 

267,705 

1,282,320 


24,154 

20,548 

185,421 

20 

40 

3,437 

3,455 

36,514 


2,053 

6,234 

138,278 

100 
6,365 

35 


6,283 

2,561 

15,181 

300 

6,588 

10,611 
38,825 


30,325 
1,294 


11,676 
5,672 


4,695 


454 


1,923,000 

90,412 

130 

48,545 

90,070 


390 

7,258 

130 

3,uo4 


19,317 
5,561 


54,450 

1,505 

1 

1,868 

3,356 


143,037 


26,111 


13,103 


5,630 


3,673,394 
361,494 


13,391 
10,045 


300,869 
1,270 


57,682 
14,792 


9,067 


6,111 


5,112 


— 


680,955 
314,358 


245 
4,675 


1,474 
4,777 


26,776 
14,689 



678,373 



2,400 



7,502 



28,395 



i Restricted to capital. 2 Not stated. 3 Reported under Children's Aid Association. 



II. 

writable Corporations — Continued. 



71 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 





Service or Relief Given To 


Paid 










Officers 






Families 




and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$2001 


15,104 
2 


15,718 


6,595 


428 


9,505 


9,697 


3,070 


4,500 


91,099 


101,881 


55,026 


121 


2,423 

4,205 

31,746 


2,509 

4,084 

31,901 


250 
18,695 


— 


11,589 


11,514 


4,471 



38 


— 


320 


10 


25 


18 


575 


477 



21 



15 



753 



1,220 



1,292 



200 



— 


1,665 
28,742 


1,661 

27,830 


25,912 


12 


9 

2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


25,153 
1,472 


25,93.1 
1,472 


15,159 
28 


29 

1 


767 


767 


— 


3,340 


2,3661 


13,621 


14,658 


5,841 


8 


36 


— 


- 


■ — 


— 


34,250 


34,014 


— 


— 


331 


331 


316 


— 


' 4,5261 


647,345 
36,987 
23,708 

1 

29,817 
106,602 


631,891 
39,912 
23,917 


302,192 
3,594 


257 
5 


18,026 

106 


6,484 
106 


— 


— 


— 


29,006 
130,710 


18,604 
28,507 


16 

25 





— 








1,692 

10011 

13,509 J 

1,7341 

J41811 

1417 J 


14,744 

96,568 
54,479 


13,692 

97,323 
55,749 


4,246 
18,182 


4 
11 


— 3 
266 


3 

106 


— 3 


— 


4,319,689 


3,870,335 


2,380,056 


2,447 


148,734 


136,313 


— 


— 


— 


15,835 


17,398 


— 


— 


— 2 


— 2 


— 2 


— 


6,1661 

2,000 

40,3111 


32,490 

29,344 

338,880 

320 

6,728 

11,803 

14,067 

75,375 


32,760 

25,104 

341,367 

261 

7,074 

12,610 

15,269 

88,907 


22,399 

8,977 

217,612 

251 

375 

4,321 

32,664 


10 
6 
172 
7 
2 
8 

39 


26,337 

11,376 

140 
1,098 


12,584 

1,460 

140 

1,098 


20 
52 


5,997 
2,611 


. 


14,476 
5,672 


15,699 
5,346 


8,612 
3,670 


9 
4 


2,886 


2,601 


— 


— 


11,2931 


74,368 

14,325 

131 

1,868 

6,410 


71,236 

15,417 

157 

1,868 

11,414 


37,080 
5,113 

100 
260 


46 
16 

1 
1 


68 
16,590 

20 


10 
7,340 

20 


22 


— 


— 


44,845 


44,458 


36,551 


24 


11,239 


6,487 


~ — 


— 


3001 


368,226 
26,107 


402,106 
23,656 


154,887 
3,600 


281 
2 


10,867 

115 


1,013 
115 


— 


— 


— 


11,224 


10,473 


8,276 


16 


169 


— 


— 


— 


16,419 


44,916 

24,142 


26,864 
16,760 


13,101 
300 


20 
2 


25 
18 


13 
18 


— 






121 



— 38,297 



33,245 



12,624 



13,6084 6,0364 



4 Censi 



72 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Privcl 











Interes 




Total 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 


Dividem 


Name and Address 


Assets 


tions and 


and 


Annuiti 




Reported 


Gifts 


Refunds 


and Rent 


Boston — Con. 










1 Boston Provident Association, 7 Water St. . 


$407,975 


$97,357 


$4,511 


$21,634$ 


2 Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement Fund, 










15 Beacon St. ...... 


1,971,347 


— 


67,824 


7i,7m 


3 Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc., 










7 Harcourt St 


78,024 


340 


29,298 


— ] 


4 Boston Seamen's Friend Society (Incorporated) . 


455,220 


21,159 


4,535 


18,200 


5 Boston Section Council of Jewish Women . 


16,840 


5,753 


6,538 


— 


6 Boston Society for the Care of Girls, The, 41 Mt. 










Vernon St. ....... 


512,436 


4,802 


1,004 


23,165 



Boston Society of Optometrists, Incorporated 

Boston Students Union, Inc., 81 St. Stephen St. . 

Boston Students Union, Inc. — Students House 
Corporation (Unincorporated), 96 The Fenway 
and 81 St. Stephen St 

Boston Tuberculosis Association, 554 Columbus Ave. 

Boston Tuberculosis Association (Sheltered Work- 
shop), 35 Tyler St. ..... 

Boston United Moath Chitim Association, The, 24 
Province St. ..... . 

Boston Urban League, Inc., 22 Whittier St. 

Boston Veteran Journalists' Benevolent Associa- 
tion, Inc.2 ....... 

Boston Wesleyan Association, 581 Boylston St. 

Boston Work Horse Relief Association, 109 North- 
ampton St. ...... 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association, 316 
Huntington Ave. . _ . . _ . 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union, 48 Boyl- 
ston St. ... 

Boston Young Women's Christian Association, 
140 Clarendon St. 

Boston Zezmer Association Inc. 

Boys' Clubs of Boston Incorporated, The, 15 Green 
St., Charlestown ..... 

Boys' Clubs of Boston Incorporated, The (Bunker 
Hill Girls Club), 60 High St., Charlestown 

Brigham Hospital (not in operation) . 

British Charitable Society, 5 Park Sq. 

Brooke House, 79 Chandler St.i . 

Brothers of Charity, Inc., The, 11 Perkins St. 
Jamaica Plain ...... 

Burnap Free Home for Aged Women, 38 Pleasant 
St., Dorchester ...... 

Burrage Hospital Association (not in operation)! 

Butrimantz Social & Aid Association . 

Calvary Rescue Mission, Inc., 12 Marshall St. 

Camp Alcott, Inc. ..... 

Camp Allen, Inc., 52 Chauncy St. 

Camp Dorchester Association Incorporated . 

Cape Cod Association ..... 

Carney Hospital, 39 Old Harbor St., South Boston 
(188 beds) 

Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc., 39 Old 
Harbor St., South Boston . 

Channing Home, in Boston, 198 Pilgrim Rd. 

Charitable Irish Society, The, 40 Court St. 

Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop, 1 Vila St. 

Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of the 

Charles H. Hood Fund, 500 Rutherford Ave., 
Charlestown 

Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, The 

Charlestown Charity Fund, Trustees of the 

Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of the . 

Charlotte Cushman Club of Boston, The, 1 Marl- 
borough St. ...... 

Chevra Schass of Boston, Inc., 45 Intervale St. 
Roxbury ....... 

Children's Aid Association (Unincorporated), 41 
Mt. Vernon St. . . . . 

Children's Hospital, The, 300 Longwood Ave. 
(269 beds) . . . . 

Children's Mission to Children, The, 20 Ashburton 

Place . . .... 

Children's Museum of Boston, 60 Burroughs St. 
Jamaica Plain ....... 

Chinese Mission of New England, 16 Oxford St.i 

Christopher Shop, Inc., The, 36 Washington St. 



8,706 
240,198 


2,853 
50,767 


83,401 
12,559 


3,263 


7,458 


14,500 


9,623 


— 


20 
803 


8,105 
5,640 


822 


— 


2,040 
405,979 


— 


114 
74,440 


49 
3,407 


163,8'72 


885 


2,494 


6,524 


4,331,406 


448,348 


1,244,629 


24,223 


2,485,199 


61,112 


7,563 


19,852 


2,587,908 
50 


132,921 


362,786 


18,535 
1 


581,222 


138,668 


5,519 


7,133 


8,053 

1,141 

68,317 


12,783 

257 


849 
449 


2,573 



24,712 

451,091 

421 

423 

5,412 

10,968 

6,318 

26,005 

275,921 

10,238 
293,229 
22,293 
73,070 
84,406 

140,630 

1,418 

4,310 

71,716 

56,696 

6,000 

2,148 

7,608,933 

1,087,935 

287,732 

3,041 



6,478 



1,367 

2,653 

202,023 

148,882 

18,261 

28,717 

13,932 



5,511 

524 

285,553 
5,970 
1,267 
5,891 



201 


600 


16,392 


185 
1,617 

275 
2,072 
1,316 


409 

1,023 

75 

2,652 


954 


5,061 


218,368 ' 


9,221 


1,548 
2,415 
2,393 


11,226 

2,290 

28,519 


18 

10,782 

2 

1,550 

3,781 


)1,225 


— 


7,000 

123 

2,182 



118 



196,507 

42,448 

4,575 

1,257 



-None. 



1 No report. 



2 Report for 1 1 months. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



I II. 

'haritable Corporations 



73 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



if$3,4003) 
6,450 J 



2,000 



$123,502 

139,545 

29,638 

50,345 
12,291 

30,972 
1,217 



86,254 
66,590 

24,123 



4,000 



8,105 
6,462 

163 

77,847 

13,904 



181, 

|2, 
16 



6023 1,383,477 
,4073) 



450 
0003 
,919 



88,977 

521,162 
1 

136,372 

13,632 

3,280 



$125,760 

62,245 

24,389 

42,590 
10,877 

41,518 
1,228 



71,693 
66,122 

24,032 

8,089 
5,958 

490 

77,322 

9,178 

1,383,337 

89,227 

511,256 
50 

127,101 

15,610 

4,061 



$28,983 

890 

16,544 

24,103 

245 

21,234 
26,282 

5,750 
4,110 

30,708 

4,905 

774,976 

40,636 
290,952 

79,803 

10,168 

600 



60 
38 

6 
2 

10 

3 

631 

31 
308 

83 

17 
1 



— 1,811 



430 
61 



12,820 
193 



8,304 
30 



31 



5 5 

5,364 5,193 



54 



4 4 

10,5536 10,553* 

2,718 100 

35,952 — « 



188 



25 



725 



54 — 

— 2,300 



243 



— 


6,478 


5,674 


— 


— 


14 


14 


— 


23 


17,193 


16,316 


5,801 


6 


27 


27 


— 


— 


594 
1,617 
1,298 
2,319 
4,053 

954 


502 
1,696 
1,593 
2,311 
3,942 

793 


400 
508 
640 
636 


1 

9 

7 

16 


34,193* 

60 

38 

138 

6 


5 

5 

43 
6 


11 


10,897 


243,549 


234,671 


82,777 


124 


45,463 


211 


— 


— 


1,567 

24,423 
4,686 

30,069 
3,781 


1,714 
26,220 

5,385 
26,959 

4,105 


12,467 

1,497 

18,511 

200 


15 

2 

11 

1 


72 
24 

5 

6 


6 
24 
— 5 

6 


— 


— 


7,000 

61,225 

123 

2,182 


8,605 

59,886 

81 

2,324 


525 


2 


144 


144 


3 
111 


— 


6,997 


8,201 


807 


2 


225 


24 


— 


— 


3,187 


3,599 


2,303 


3 


62 


37 


— 


— 


202,023 


202,182 


67,752 


36 


952 


734 


— 


97,1243 


578,178 


624,635 


319,422 


362 


23,039 


5 


— 


23,296 


89,976 


82,100 


29,327 


15 


498 


431 


— 


10,8633 


34,560 


34,790 


22,809 


15 


180,100* 


180,100* 


— 


— 


21,103 


21,565 


5,398 


7 


40 


40 


— 


4 Reoorte 


d under Ch 


ldren's Aid 


Association. 


5 Not stated. 


6 Animal 


5. 



23,120 



9,073 
1,087 



19 



45 



62 



1 
226 



15 



Attendance. 



74 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Privi 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 
Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interes 
Divider) 

Annuit: 
and Ren 



Boston — Con. 

1 Church Home Society for the Care of Children of 

the Protestant Episcopal Church, The, 41 Mt. 
Vernon St. ....... 

2 City Missionary Society, 14 Beacon St. 

3 Clara C. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St. 

4 Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston, The, 

376 West Fourth St., South Boston . 

5 Commonwealth Charitable Corporation . 

6 Community Federation of Boston, 80 Federal St. 

7 Community Health Association, 137 Newbury St. 

8 Community Service of Boston, Inc., 739 Boylston 

St. . . . ... 

9 Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachusetts, 

The, 102 Bowdoin St 

10 Congregation Tikvos Yisroel and New Dorchester 

Hebrew School, 114 Southern Ave., Dorchester 

11 Consumers' League of Massachusetts (Inc.), 31A 

Mt. Vernon St 

12 Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the . 

13 Cooperative Workrooms, Inc., 36 Washington St. 

14 Council for Greater Boston Camp Fire Girls, 100 

Boylston St. ....... 

15 Daly Industrial School, The, 111 Train St., Dor- 

chester ........ 

16 Deaconess' Aid Society of New England 

17 Dean Foundation for Little Children, Inc. . 

18 Denison House, 93 Tyler St 

19 Deutsches Altenheim, Incorporated, 2222 Centre 

St., West Roxbury . . 

20 Devens Benevolent Society ..... 

21 Diocesan Board of Missions, 1 Joy St. 

22 Directory for Mothers' Milk, Inc., The, 221 Long- 

wood Ave. ........ 

23 Disabled Ex-Service Men's Exchange,. Inc., 355 

Boylston St. ...... 

24 Disabled Veterans Hospital Service Inc., 376 Boyl- 

ston St. ....... 

25 Dorchester Free Loan Association! 

26 Dorchester House, Incorporated, 7 Gordon Place, 

Dorchesteri ....... 

27 Durant Incorporated, Thel ..... 

28 East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. 

29 Eastern Star of Massachusetts Charitable Founda- 

tion, Inc. ........ 

30 Educational Association of Perchange, Harpoot . 

31 Edward A. Filene Good Will Fund, Inc., 31 Milk St. 

32 Edward Hatch Memorial, Inc.l .... 

33 Elizabeth Peabody House Association, The, 357 

Charles St 

34 Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation, 

The, 20 Undine Rd., Brighton .... 

35 Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc., 66 

Berkeley St. ...... 

36 Emergency Planning and Research Bureau, Inc., 

4 Park St 

37 Employees' Fund, Incorporated .... 

38 Episcopal City Mission, The (General) 1 Joy St. . 

39 Episcopal City Mission, The (Allen Recreation 

Center, Revere) ...... 

40 Episcopal City Mission, The (Lincoln-Hill Camp," 

Foxboro) . . . ... 

41 Episcopal City Mission, The' (Morville House) 

273 Clarendon St. ..... 

42 Episcopal City Mission, The (Sailors' Haven) 46 

Water St., Charlestown ..... 

43 Eretz Israel Aid Society, 20 Charlotte St., Dor- 

chester ........ 

44 European Aid Society, Inc., 800 Morton St.," 

Dorchester ....... 

45 Evangelistic Association of New England, 88 Tre- 

mont St. ...... f 

46 Faith and Hope Association, The, 73 Tremont St." 

47 Family Welfare Society of Boston, 10 Derne St. 
— None. l No report. 2 Not stated. 



$332,495 

398,795 

1,314,710 


$51,974 
20,460 


$17,935 
14,705 


$13,40 
13,29 
77,31 


42,270 


981 


— 




267,714 
894,842 


3,481,181 
144,486 


130,434 


40,46. 


17,816 


23,827 


1,234 


69' 


322,398 


1,714 


— 


16,24! 


9,426 


1,548 


3,874 


- 


326 
47,676 
12,380 


5,407 
38,608 


23,398 


1,891 
11! 


37,396 


7,150 


15,758 


Yi 


153,661 
22,046 

419,243 
62,327 


1,535 
675 

21,234 


13,025 
254 

2,342 


661 
1,11! 

10,50; 


1,217,572 

2,040 

317,388 


1,353 
1,998 


10,445 


33,13* 

4C 

10,88C 


36,004 


3,224 


18,963 


42 


27,392 


4,316 


32,215 


393 


13,210 


6,554 


— 


212 



8,624 

387,873 
7,072 
2,465 



201,155 

208,682 

61,129 

30,692 
67,662 

1,164,090 



17,367 
12,035 



1,057,202 



398 



25,638 
180 



30,144 
L357 

29,418 
9,463 

17,290 



8,016 



113 



16,663 
3,200 



394,556 



14,946 
837 







1,682 


1,119 


— 


6,235 


2,355 


843 


1,728 


658 
2,645 


2,511 


21,451 


3,249 


1,546 


7,690 


30 


418 


9,861 


2,348 


5,562 



433 

2,831 
4,596 



610 
28,105 



3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Visits. 



I II. 

'haritable Corporations — Continued. 



75 



Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief 


Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




$10,1223 
364 


$80,503 
48,825 
77,310 


$87,096 

60,942 

114,005 


$27,847 

26,840 

1,673 


23 

21 

4 


251 


108 


166 

700 





4 

1 
44 


1 
2 
3 


— 


981 


2,228 


1,036 


4 


66 


66 


20 


— 


— 


4 
5 
6 
7 


— 3,481,181 3,662,683 
593 315,980 324,872 


147,440 
291,219 


89 
171 


271,8954 


143,223* 


— 


— 


114 


— 


25,756 


24,883 


16,981 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


450 


8 


3,105 


21,069 


14,868 


350 


4 


72 


72 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


5,422 


4,981 


2,565 


3 


75 


5 


— 


— 


— 


10 


— 


5,407 

1,898 

62,122 


5,408 
15,453 
62,584 


3,777 
24,056 


3 

15 


448 


448 





— 


1 
1 


11 

12 
13 


— 


22,920 


21,996 


8,039 


32 


— 


— 


— 


2,260 


— 


14 


100 


15,221 

2,145 

10,507 

23,577 


16,336 

2,345 

9,686 

23,695 


3,832 

1,250 
14,008 


2 

2 
22 


102 


3 

\ 


— 


640 


1 
27 


15 
16 
17 
18 


66 


45,062 


26,365 


9,321 


12 


46 


— 


2 


— 


— 


19 


— 


40 


29 


— 


— 


— 2 


— 2 


— 


— 


— 


20 


— 


12,878 


12,451 


— 


— 





— 


— 


— 


— 


21 


— 


22,230 


22,997 


7,969 


6 


420 


102 


18 


— 


6 


22 


— 


36,925 


37,809 


6,956 


4 


264 


264 


— 


— 


— 


23 


5,000 


11,766 


7,950 


1,300 


1 


— 2 


— 2 


— 


— 


— 


24 
25 


_ 


15,352 


14,419 


175 


1 


87 


87 


— 


— 


— 


26 
27 
28 


— 


27,628 
314 


26,112 
409 


8,345 


11 


34 
18 


18 


— 





— 


29 
30 


— 


— 


34 


■ — ■ 


— 












31 

32 


— 


42,946 


42,983 


22,953 


19 


— 


— 


- — 


2,068 


— 


33 


— 


7,592 


7,674 


3,060 


7 


2,217* 


* 2,217** 


— 


— 


— 


34 


— 


32,617 


31,762 


18,358 


12 


— 


— 


— 


601 


— 


35 


(18,3233) 
I 5,581 J 


11,849 
2,645 

46,834 


12,847 
9,114 

34,507 


11,274 
15,619 


7 
51 


129 


34 


4 


— 


— 


36 

3 7 

38 


— 


4,795 


11,418 


2,086 


15 


990 


— 


— 


— 


— 


39 


— 


7,720 


10,750 


2,134 


20 


192 


119 


— 


— 


— 


40 


— 


10,279 


3,426 


944 


10 


32 


2 


— 


— 


— 


41 


— 


15,927 


22,989 


14,703 


9 


— 


— 


31 


50,000 


— 


42 








. — 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


43 



,'57,505^ 
[ 2,650 



546 



17,274 
6,032 



408,841 



* Attendance. 



517 



18,811 
5,915 



425,510 



Animals. 



6,019 
2,223 

137,509 



689 



94 



5,828 



— |45 

— 46 



P.D. 17 ill 
Abstracts of Reports of Privatt\ V 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends. 

Annuities 
and Rental 



Boston — Con. 
Farm and Trades School, The, Thompson's Island 
Fathers and Mothers Club, The . 
Faulkner Hospital Corporation, The, 1153 Centre 

St., Jamaica Plain (147 beds) . 
Federated Jewish Charities of Boston, 6 North 

Russell St. 

Fellowcrafters Guild 1 ..... 
First Needlework Guild of Boston 
First-Spiritualist-Ladies Aid Society of Boston 
Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, 88 

Tremont St. ..... . 

Forest Hills General Hospital, Incorporated, 41 

Morton St., Jamaica Plain (117 beds) 
Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children, 140 The 

Fenway ....... 

Foundation for Temperance Education, Inc., The 
Fragment Society, The ..... 



Frances E. Willard Settlement, 45 Milk St. 

Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc., 50 Beacon 
St., Hyde Park 

Franklin Square House, The, 11 East Newton St. 

Franklin Typographical Society . 

Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The 

Frederika Home, Inc., 65 Deaconess Rd. 

Freeman L. Lowell Memorial Hospital and Dis- 
pensary, 415 Newbury St. ... 

French Benevolent and Relief Association . 

Friends of Prisoners, Inc., 51 Cornhill 2 

Fuller Foundation, Inc., The 

Gemilas Chesed Temche Shabos Ass'n. Inc., 17 
Otisfield St., Roxbury 1 

General Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal 
Christian Women, 25 Beacon St. 

General Union of Chimishgadzak, Inc. 

George H. and Irene L. Walker home for Chil- 
dren, Incorporated ..... 

German Aid Society of Boston, The, 51 Cornhill 

German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston, 2222 Centre 
St., West Roxbury ..... 

Girl Scout Training School, Inc., 87 Beacon St. 

Girls' Friendly Society Home 

Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massa- 
chusetts, Inc., The, 29 Fairfield St. . 

Good Will House Association, 177 Webster St. 
East Boston ...... 

Greenwood Church Community House Inc., 386 
Washington St., Dorchester 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund, Inc. 

Guild of St. Apollonia, Inc., The . 

Guild of St. Elizabeth, The, 27 Dudley St., Roxbury 

Habit Clinic for Child Guidance, Inc., 15 Autumn St. 

Hahnemann Hospital (not in operation) 

Hairenik Association, 212 Stuart St. . 

Hale House Association, 12 Davis St. . 

Hand and Hand Ladies Society of Mattapan, Inc. 
800 Morton St., Mattapan 

Harriet Tubman House, Inc., 25 Holyoke St. 

Harry E. Burroughs Newsboys Foundation, Inc. 
The, 10 Somerset St. .... 

Health Research Foundation, Incorporated . 

Hebrew Free Loan Society of Boston, The, 532 
Warren St., Roxbury ..... 

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The, 10 Tremont St. 

Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of Roxbury, 
646 Warren St., Roxbury ..... 

Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainim Association, 21 
Queen St., Dorchester ..... 

Hecht Neighborhood House Incorporated, 160 
American Legion Highway, Dorchester 

Helena Dudley Foundation 1 ..... 

Helping Hand Sisters Association of East Boston 
Inc., The ........ 

Helping Hand Society "Dania" .... 



$794,897 
24,753 


$14,083 
157 


$10,664 

275 


$32,419 
524 


1,581,305 


28,795 


284,198 


5,912 


218,976 


— 


— 


7,167 


3,502 
121 


456 
72 


160 


141 
1 


749,848 


41,863 


14,924 


12,272 


358,544 


185 


137,058 


2 


153,748 

7,828 

61,871 


9,259 
3,058 


68,066 


97,411 
431 

2,246 


342,127 


45,691 


77,455 


3,637 


308,410 
790,089 
89,697 
654,181 
254,183 


100 
3,027 


1,501 

296,127 

72 

133 

4,368 


12,309 
13,370 
3,179 
25,135 
14,054 


1,499 

493 

829 

288,135 


1,067 

2,137 
10,000 


1,863 
128 


14 
9,087 


331,294 
1,025 


24,483 
230 


300 


13,808 
9 



63,311 

42,135 
36,485 
46,460 

99,678 

19,316 

186 

260 

712 

15,486 

10,879 

156,006 

69,054 

122,740 

516 
16,322 

316,616 



96,164 
650 

23,839 

519,079 

14,796 



546 

344 
2,255 
1,113 

1,812 

17,352 



4,500 

5,026 

1,151 

15,705 

2,800 

16,455 

11,446 

712 
5,613 

46,398 



12,040 
10,706 

1,838 

76,865 

23,957 



681 
97 



190 
35 



484 
1,037 
4,041 

18,585 



4,224 

1,588 

3,139 

206 

785 

41,096 

1,149 

810 
221 

803 



222,693 

36,740 

24,011 

437 



237 
27 



3,083 - 

1,808 

901 

87 
14 

96 

2,005 
3,815 



370 



3,178 
681 



18 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Report for 11 months. 



Restricted to capital. 



t. II. 

haritable Corporations — Continued. 



77 



Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


>ervice or Relief Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




£11,00031 
59,460 S % 


116,627 
964 


$70,365 
1,047 


$30,991 
340 


27 
4 


116 

52 


20 
52 


— 


— 


— 


1 
2 


— 


327,494 


347,750 


161,726 


207 


5,594 


1,146 


— 


— 


— 


3 


660 


7,827 


8,334 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


4 
5 
6 
7 

8 


J7,579*l 
14,469 j 


758 
74- 

63,216 


646 
87 

59,869 


,32,253 


35 


345 


256 


701 

5 


— 


44 


— 


137,246 


143,764 


64,808 


85 


3,677 


1,519 


— 


— 


— 


9 


(1,73331 
116,853 j 


1-74,737 

431 

5,304 

130,290 


180,496 

421 

4,483 

111,271 


103,617 
35,368 


79 

58 


82,434 
723 

552 


723 
3 


— 


— 


28 


10 

11 

12 

13 


6,040 


13,810 

315,639 

6,278 

25,268 

18,422 


11,155 

293,079 

7,472 

22,140 

18,422 


5,166 

136,487 

75 

3,850 

5,667 


6 

161 

3 

3 

10 


8 

4,844 

48 

51 

13 


4 

51 


14 


— 


14 


14 

15 
16 

17 
18 


— 


2,931 


2,701 


1,629 


2 


4,574 


2,606 


43 


— 


— 


19 

20 
21 

22 


— 


2,280 
19,087 


3,078 
10,671 


— 


— 


4 


4 


— 


— 


1 
21 












v 










23 


16,7813 




38,292 
539 


39,838 
1,435 


5,400 


3 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


24 
25 


— 


3,630 


3,779 


720 


1 


— 


- 


250 


— 


= 


26 

27 


— 


2,640 
3,292 
6,302 


1,866 
1,716 
6,484 


200 
1,309 


2 
11 


139 


— 


14 


— 





28 

29 
30 


— 


20,858 


20,909 


5,247 


8 


— 


— 


— 


1,641 


— 


31 


— 


17,439 


14,602 


8,023 


7 


— 


— 


— 


937 


1 


32 


— 


4,239 
4,500 


4,214 
4,731 


1,066 


1 


1,000 


— 


— 


— 


32 


33 

34 


— 


6,618 

4,386 

15,912 

5,591 

57,552 

16,411 


6,408 

4,783 

19,462 

4,224 

58,134 

18,606 


2,979 

2,175 

15,006 

22,596 
11,093 


2 

5 

11 

17 
7 


8,490 
71 

374 


8,490 

3 

329 


65 


253 


1 


35 
36 
37 

38 
39 
40 


— 


1,523 
5,834 


1,410 
5,381 


5 
1,291 


1 
5 


25 
1,125 


— 4 

600 


70 
35 


— 


7 


41 
42 





47,288 


49,084 


29,066 


51 


— 


— 


63 


2,408 


12 


43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


45 


45 


— 


— 


— 


44 


502 
150 


235,607 
10,856 


236,763 
11,420 


7,373 
5,112 


5 
4 


2,096 
16,229 


2,096 
16,229 


— 


— 


~ 


45 
46 


— 


38,578 


39,836 


1,026 


5 


499 


499 


— 


— 


— 


47 


' . 4,308 


110,348 


107,556 


32,090 


45 


309 


283 


— 


— 


— 


48 


— 


25,076 


26,144 


15,102 


18 


— 


— 


— 


2,471 


— 


49 
50 


— 


446 
62 


541 
40 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 
9 


— 


— 


51 
52 


4 Not state 


d. 





















B 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



N.UIK AM) Auorkss 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 

Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society, Boston, 
FuKia and Ellis Sts., Roxburv .... 

Home tor Aged Colored Women. The. 22 Hancock St. 

Home tor Aged Couples, 2055 Columbus Ave., 
Roxburv ........ 

Home tor Aged Men, 133 West Springfield St. . 

Home tor Aged Women, 205 South Huntington Ave. 

Home tor Destitute Catholic Children, 788 Harri- 
son Ave. ....... 

Home for Italian Children, Inc., 1125 Centre St., 
Jamaica Plain ....... 

Home Makers Association of Massachusetts, 30 
Huntington Ave. ...... 

Hope Rescue Mission, Inc., 554 Massachusetts Ave. 

Household Nursing Association, The, 222 Newbury 

House of the Angel Guardian, Trustees of the, 
11 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain . 

House of the Good Shepherd, 841 Huntington Ave. 

Housing Association of Metropolitan Boston, The, 
7 Water St 

Howard Benevolent Society, 14 Beacon St. . 

Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. The, 1 Court St. ... 

Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children . 

Huntington Institute for Orphan Children, The 

Independent Zviller Free Loan Association, Inc. 

Industrial Aid Society, 51 Cornhill 

Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed 
Children, The, 241 St. Botolph St. . 

Industrial School for Girls, 232 Centre St. 
Dorchester ....... 

Infants Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave. (50 beds) 

Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 
424 Dudley St., Roxbury (See also Somerville) 

International Friendship League, Incorporated, 
41 Mt. Vernon St.i 

International Institute of Boston, Inc., 190 Beacon 
St 

Jacoby Club of Boston, The, 168 Dartmouth St. 

Jamaican Associates, Inc. ..... 

Jamaica Plain Dispensary, 26 South St., Jamaica 
Plain ......... 

Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association, 
276 Amory St., Jamaica Plain .... 

Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 

Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston, 6 North 
Russell St 

Jewish Child Welfare Association, 6 North Rus- 
sell St 

Jewish Memorial Hospital, 45 Townsend St.] 
Roxbury (79 beds) 

Jewish Ministers Cantors Association of New 
England 1 ........ 

Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of Massachusetts 3 ' 

Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of New England 1 

Jewish Vocational Aid Society .... 

Jewish Young Women's Social Group, Inc. . . 

John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the 
Benefit and Support of Aged Poor Persons, and 
of Orphans and Deserted Children, Trustees of, 
43 Hawkins St. 

John Howard Society ..... 

John H. Storer Student Loan Fund, Incorporated 

Joseph Herman Trust Fund, Inc., The 1 

Josiah Willard Hayden Recreation Centre, Inc. 

judge Baker Guidance Center, 38^ Beacon St. 

Junior League of Boston, Inc., The, Zero Marl- 
borough St. ....... 

Keith Fund, Inc. ...... 

Kfar Debiau Society, Inc. . 

Knights of Lithuania, Council # 17, Inc. . 

Ladiei Auxiliary to L, 6th, and Third Battalic, 
372d Infantry, Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. 

Ladies Helping Hand Home for Jewish Children, 
35 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton 1 



$83 
307,567 

2,562,486 
1,458,626 
2,520,346 

921,634 

225,855 

8,508 

129,177 

367,084 
982,777 

1,110 
323,970 

396,927 
65,056 

222,610 

750 

85,675 

2,394,443 

199,287 
865,008 

117,015 



14,397 

2,547 

721 

1,691 

31,257 
1,943 



649 
155,557 



1,390 
146 



214,475 

123,012 

8,834 

25,067 
448,436 

95,848 

88,557 

135 

779 



$989 
1,078 

35 
3,325 
3,471 

6,537 

48,131 

220 
905 

9,764 

25,000 
10,839 

7,100 
7,850 



37,824 
2,793 



3,590 
28,351 



19,064 



17,627 

3,175 

210 



7,904 
1,700 

5,487 

61,849 

42,257 



2,308 
128 



40 



292 



8,933 
35,884 

35,233 

213 
9 

95 



$4,802 
59 

22,830 

19,173 

501 

6,196 

93 

29,883 

56,643 
77,894 



519 

2,805 

1,499 

1,193 
16,289 



1,630 

428 

178 

315 
3,599 

10,316 
21,524 



1,339 
682 



369 

443 



1,797 
14,849 



59 

892 



21 



$10,841 

86,181 
51,172 
61,259 

23,059, 

579 



453 
345 



13,836 

16,740 

2,979 

10,225 

3,972 

73,628 

7,742 -1 
32,867 



1,750 



3,214 

456 



7,577 

5,312 

137 

134 
13,525 



4,795 



I No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Name changed to Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of New England. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations- 



79 



Continued. 



Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


ervice or Relief 


GJiven To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




$3464 


$5,791 
11,979 


$5,814 
11,959 


$1,207 
3,378 


3 
7 


32 
17 


4 

2 


33 


— 


1 


1 
2 


17,328 


126,375 
54,498 
84,138 


83,622 

66,760 

114,360 


28,154 
21,754 
32,333 


34 
22 
49 


138 
119 
243 


83 


— 


— 


3 


3 

4 
5 


85,411 


115,510 


67,042 


22,394 


25 


946 


946 


— 


— 


— 


6 


2,321 


57,228 


21,350 


4,980 


10 


120 


85 


— 


— 


— 


7 


— 


220 
999 


222 
991 


463 


1 


2,9535 


— 2 


40 





— 


8 
9 


— 


40,101 


35,535 


16,737 


39 


3,331 


109 


— 


— 


— 


10 


8,000 
10,979 


89,989 
99,713 


89,367 
98,967 


11,935 
16,634 


9 
12 


464 
449 


153 
265 


— 


— 


— 


11 
12 


— 


7,100 
21,686 


7,063 
25,223 


5,910 

2,225 


3 

2 


— 


— 


625 


— 


1 


13 

14 


— 


16,740 

2,979 

10,225 

519 

44,602 


16,952 

3,446 

10,505 

488 

44,804 


8,741 
225 

25 
17,659 


13 
2 

1 
11 


1 

2 

3,343 


1 

2 

3,343 


48 


— 


8 
1 


15 
16 
17 
18 
19 


18,650 


96,572 


72,880 


43,345 


62 


135 


135 


— 


— 


— 


20 


1,0634 


12,526 
77,509 


13,576 
82,977 


5,133 
2,300 


6 
16 


33 
723 


13 
24 


— 


— 


— 


21 
22 


16,614 


35,873 


48,778 


, 927 


1 


164 


164 


— 


— 


— 


23 
24 


— 


19,257 

3,175 

639 


17,885 

3,620 

558 


12,957 
2,040 


7 
2 


516 
310 


516 

2 


1,354 


— 


357 
1 


25 
26 
27 


— 


1,928 


1,411 


912 


2 


3,068 


2,351 


— 


— 


— 


28 


3,0004 


8,319 
5,326 


8,525 
4,835 


6,292 


8 


3 


3 


15 


1,277 


4 


29 
30 


— 


5,487 


5,487 


4,804 


3 


361 


2 


— 


— 


— 


31 


852 
(5,38741 
\ 129 5 


76,233 
64,369 


76,338 
60,230 


15,434 
27,718 


9 

44 


182 
195 


140 
73 





— 


— 


32 

33 


— 


3,647 

810 


3,544 
761 


25 


1 


54 


— 2 


32 


— 


— 


34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


1,610 
50,0004 


7,577 

7,583 

581 

9,067 
51,206 


3,030 

12,188 

900 

56,550 


3,350 
49,497 


2 
41 


27 

1,257 

29 

1,221 


27 
1,257 

372 


61 





2 

1 
30 


39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 


— 


50,686 

4,795 

272 

902 


49,316 

44,193 

176 

788 


10,284 
7,750 

325 


11 

2 

4 


10 


10 


— 


102 


24 
31 

1 


45 

46 
47 
48 




116 


126 










5 




2 


49 
50 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Attendance. 



80 



RD. 1 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva 



34 
35 
36 

3 7 

38 
39 

40 
41 

42 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Boston — Con. 
Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts 
Ladies' Unity Club, 18 Melville Ave., Dorchester 
Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association, 47 Law- 
rence Ave., Roxburyl .... 

League of Women for Community Service, 558 
Massachusetts Ave. ..... 

Lend A Hand Society, 101 Tremont St. 
Lincoln and Therese Filene Foundation, Inc. 

80 Federal St 

Lincoln House Association, 80 Emerald St. . 
Little House, Inc., The, 73 A St., South Boston 
Lord's Day League of New England, 88 Tremont St. 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of, 
619 Washington St. (See below) 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Agricultural Fund) . 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Dumb Animal Fund) . 

Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Educational Fund) .... 

Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Fund for Aiding Discharged Convicts) 

Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Hospital Fund) 

Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Lotta Theatrical Fund) 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(Mary A. Crabtree Fund) 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 

(World War Veterans Fund No. 1) 
Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 
(World War Veterans Fund No. 2) 
Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Associa- 
tion, Incorporated, The, 100 Riverway 
Lutheran Seamen's Board, Inc., The, 9 Henry St', 

East Boston 

Marie Dewing Faelton Charitable Association, Inc.* 
30 Huntington Ave. .... 

Martinist Home, The, 5 Mt. Pleasant Place," 
Roxbury ...... 

Mary Catherine Keith Foundation, Inc.i 
Masonic Education and Charity Trust, 51 Boylston 

Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy, 
Inc., 554 Columbus Ave 

Massachusetts Association for Promoting the In- 
terests of the Adult Blind .... 

Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society, 88 Tre- 
mont St. 

Massachusetts Baptist Convention, 15 Ashb'urtori 
Place ....... 

Massachusetts Branch of National Association on 
Indian Affairs, Inc. .... 

Massachusetts Branch of the International Order 
of The King's Daughters and Sons, The, 14 
Beacon St.5 

Massachusetts Branch of the Shut' In Society Inc.," 
The ...... 

Massachusetts Branch of the Woman's' Auxiliary 
to the National Council of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the United States of America, 
The, 1 Joy St 

Massachusetts Catholic Woman's Guild 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society, The ' 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Summer 
Street Fire Fund) 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association! 
Ill Huntington Ave. 

Massachusetts Charitable Society, ' The ' 

Massachusetts Child Council, Incorporated, 41 Mt' 
Vernon St. ..... 

Massachusetts Civic League, ' 3 Joy St 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society,' 



Th 

Massachusetts Congregational Conference 
Missionary Society, 14 Beacon St. 



and 



$122,869 



8,898 



27,082 

1,873 

68,949 

68,320 

1,054,303 
225,974 

2,925 
5,578 

283,739 

1,745,099 



$1,245 



1,402 



924 
5,765 



363 

17,925 
9,926 

50 

56,403 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



$3,546 



34 



400 



Interest 

Dividenc 

Annuiti< 

and Rent; 



$2,819 



14,752 
151,751 


5,624 
4,364 


2,012 
337 


1 
5,359* 


2,476 

497,233 

9,134 

98,188 


9,000 
12,562 
10,013 

1,830 


2,394 
111 


19,944 

24 

5,815 


574,611 


— 


8,063 


15,881 


305,088 


— 


1,127 


25,048 


26,451 


— 


— 


985 


106,573 


— 


— 


4,603 


55,125 


— 


— 


2,518 


105,002 


— 


— 


4,428 


105,324 


— 


— 


4,709 


2,250,608 


2,500 


18,649 


122,511 


21,906 


— 


— 


1,018 


65,828 


19,801 


3,012 


1,741 


19,370 


1,376 


1,405 


331 


22,446 


18 


39 


1,046 


575 


1,740 


567 


9 


2,417,862 


— 


— 


88,256 


510 


762 


204 


— 


281,611 


7,025 


2,820 


9,607 


299,069 


2,743 


— 


12,247 


1,258,228 


38,196 


— ' 


53,498 


81 


250 








119 



235 
542 


1,424 

38 

2,211 


— 


1,893 


— 


84,484 
9,201 


366 
136 


— 



13,669 



71,732 



-None, i No report. 2 Not stated . 3 Name changed to Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of New England. ^ 



ritable Corporations — Continued. 



81 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 


Service or Relief Given To 










Officers 






Families 




and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



29 



$7,611 



$5,191 



$2,003 



7,653 
10,061 


7,425 
10,672 


782 
4,588 


3 
3 


. 9 
432 


1 
430 


840 
4 


9,000 
34,901 
10,150 

7,786 


8,840 
34,900 
10,347 

8,825 


7,900 

23,464 

6,421 

4,586 


2 

25 

4 

3 


— 


— 


— 


23,945 


20*,872 


2,577 


6 


45 


45 


— 


26,175 


26,091 


1,876 


5 


— 


- — 


— 


985 


918 


91 


5 


4 


4 


— 


4,603 


4,642 


381 


5 


— • 


— 


— 


2,518 


2,501 


207 


5 


— 


— 


— 


4,428 


4,668 


375 


5 


38 


38 


— 


4,709 


4,629 


387 


5 


592 


592 


758 


143,661 


138,340 


14,340 


5 


806 


806 


1,812 


1,018 


799 


61 


5 


11 


11 


62 


24,566 


11,017 


718 


3 


35 


2 


— 


3,147 


4,171 


1,487 


11 


1,980 


1,358 


25 


1,133 


1,052 


— 


— 


21 


21 


— 


2,317 


2,145 


914 


2 


3 


1 


— 


88,256 


68,179 


2,080 


1 


43 


43 


10 


970 


1,073 


133 


1 


— 


— 


— 


19,452 


20,423 


6,670 


10 


2,100 


2,075 


— 


15,041 


13,804 


700 


2 


49 


49 


— 


91,694 


95,127 


10,423 


11 


— 


— 


— 


250 


231 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 



4,456 



1,715 



605 



— 


2,584 
6,345 
2,211 


3,028 
6,633 
1,442 


162 


3 


— 


1,893 


1,016 


162 


3 


— 


84,847 
9,211 


107,675 
7,519 


40,013 
398 


32 
2 


— 


18,292 
10,460 


17,554 
14,678 


13,604 
9,631 


6 
6 


343*1 
304 J 


13,719 
136,339 


14,834 
145,580 


300 
30,083 


2 
13 



100 



76 



55 



76 



55 



4 — 



— 1,200 
701 



100 — — 



27 
135 



32 



sstricted to capital. 



5 Report not due. 



82 



10 



15 



22 



25 



26 



P.E 

Abstracts of Reports of Pt 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 

Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of the , 
Grand Army of the Republic .... 

Massachusetts Elks Scholarship, Inc. . 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles 
St. (219 beds) 

Massachusetts General Hospital, The, Fruit St., 
Boston (Includes McLean Hospital, Belmont) 
(1,002 beds) 

Massachusetts Girl Scouts, Incorporated, 87 Beacon 
St 

Massachusetts Home, 65 Deaconess Rd. 

Massachusetts Housing Association Incorporated, 
73 Tremont St 

Massachusetts Knights of Columbus Boys Camp 
Corporation, 80 Federal St. . 

Massachusetts Knights of Pythias Kiddie Kamp 
Corporation, 389 Commonwealth Ave. 

Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incorporated, 
264 Boylston St 

Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital (not in operation) 

Massachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hospital 
Corporation (not in operation) . . . 

Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society . 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals, 750 Harrison 
Ave. (392 beds) . ... 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc., 43 Ever- 
green St., Jamaica Plain (41 beds) . 

Massachusetts Prison Association, 51 Cornhill 

Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund 
Association Incorporated ..... 

Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged Pris- 
oners, 51 Cornhill . . . 

Massachusetts Society for Social Hygiene, Incor- 
porated, 80 Boylston St. . . 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals, 180 Longwood Ave. 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children, 43 Mt. Vernon St. ... 

Massachusetts Society for the University Education 
of Women . . . . . . 

Massachusetts State Firemens Association . 

Massachusetts Teachers' Federation, 15 Ashburton 
PI 

Massachusetts Tents Building Christian and Chari- 
table Association For Women Under the Juris- 
diction of the Eastern District No. 3, The, 560 
Columbus Ave. 1 . ■ 

Massachusetts Trustees of the International Com- 
mittee of Young Men's Christian Associations 
for Army & Navy Work (Incorporated), The, 
7 City Sq., Charlestown ..... 

Massachusetts Tuberculosis League Inc., 80 Boyl- 
ston St. ....... . 

Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union Inc., 302 Marlborough St. ■ .■ • 

Massachusetts Woman's Home Missionary Union, 
14 Beacon St. ....... 

Massachusetts Women's Hospital, The, 53 Parker 
Hill Ave., Roxbury (62 beds) .... 

Master Fishermen's Charitable Association 

Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, 18 Chelsea St., 

Meretz Ladies' Auxiliary, Inc. .... 

Meretz Relief Association ..... 

Merrimac Mission, Incorporated, The, 107 Stam- 
ford St. 

Merwin Memorial Free Clinic for Animals, Inc., 
542 Cambridge St., Allston .... 

Metropolitan Singers Inc. 2 ..... 

Michael Anagnos Schools ..... 

Morgan Memorial Co-operative Industries and 
Stores, Inc., The, 89 Shawmut Ave. 

Mount Pleasant Home, The, 301 South Hunting- 
ton Ave. . . . . 

National Association of Goodwill Industries, Inc., 
89 Shawmut Ave. ...... 

National Braille Press Inc., 549 East Fourth St., 
South Boston ....... 



43,122 



8,735 

123,622 

971 

153,414 

1,743,008 

423,952 

384 

33,953 



10,246 



2,438 

1,282 
321 



325,307 

6,068 

2,407 

28,240 



15,540 



825 
2,831 



494,036 
11,376 



Int« 
Divu 

Ann 
and I 



$198 
20,179 


$315 
1,100 


$410 
210 


t 


2,493,005 


22,131 


354,013 


72 


24,887,739 


240,906 


2,682,097 


531 


374,005 
79,414 


10,327 
4,370 


74,623 
18,170 


4 
1 


561,204 


200 


257 


15 


35,053 


3,460 


8,065 




2,115 


5,428 


669 




21,975 


1,208 


9,445 




61,391 
67,074 


409 





3 

2 


6,166,352 


90,250 


373,757 


177 


165,005 
3,025 


195 


92,993 




490 


319 


— 




135,270 


791 


— 


5] 


18,286 


14,634 


3,959 




4,573,415 


9,377 


151,944 


156. 


1,934,196 


149,676 


4,141 


65| 


48,566 
1,083 


332 
8,415 


260 


2J 



612,132 


28,839 


42,245 




32,172 


33,974 


8,275 




75,930 


5,856 


2,831 




220,436 


250 


276 


9, 


308,026 

24,852 

18,612 

135 

1,152 


11,180 

14,608 

68 

1,831 


76,200 

5,377 
138 
414 


6, 



None. 



No report. 



2 Report for 14 months. 3 Restricted to capital. 4 Not stated. 



[I. 

•{table Corporations — Continued. 



83 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$726 
1,981 

448,954 



$639 
1,920 

468,758 



$50 
261,273 



209 



3,532,042 3,218,300 2,052,098 1,980 



89,738 
24,139 

15,886 

11,525 

6,097 

10,653 



77,661 
20,855 

100,832 

6,801 

5,141 

10,820 



23,383 
5,410 

12,128 

1,140 

873 

3,236 



16 

7,332 

52,983 
68 

115 

292 

1,016 



16 

293 

1,701 



33,000 



12 



-4 



292 



10 
- HI 



500 

i.53) 

517 j 


3,129 

4,942 


1,386 
6,231 


250 


2 


18 


18 


— 


— 


3 


12 
13 


794,547 


707,568 


360,418 


407 


74,791 


42,752 


— 


— 


— 


14 


— 


93,228 
412 


96,100 
1,370 


37,372 
500 


42 
1 


11,425 
111 


1,889 
111 


— 


— 


2 


15 
16 


— 


319 


379 


— 


— 


22 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


— 


6,692 


4,373 


2,499 


1 


1,556 


1,556 


— 


— 


— 


18 


7f\7S~) 


18,853 


20,106 


10,180 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19 


'U/ a / 

120 j 

705S] 


324,306 


320,288 


189,205 


83 


858,2775 


830,2475 


— 


— 


— 


20 


H9 J 


266,841 


245,352 


181,439 


96 


17,552 


17,552 


7,019 


— 


— 


21 


903 


2,943 
8,415 


3,943 
8,252 


75 
2,680 


1 
3 


40 


40 


126 


— 


— 


22 
23 




26,477 


24,342 


10,538 


5' 


1 


1 








24 

25 


— 


71,085 


71,085 


44,022 


42 


— 


— 


— 


4,186 


— 


26 


— 


42,934 


45,139 


14,513 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


27 


— 


9,522 


10,741 


3,863 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


28 


1353 


10,116 


10,080 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12 


29 


— 


83,173 

11,486 

20,367 

206 

2,245 


93,533 

10,486 

20,462 

71 

2,155 


48,660 

2,850 

11,071 

250 


61 

2 

16 

2 


1,495 
36,2706 


55 
20,1616 


135 
3 


— 


1 
4 


30 

31 
32 
33 

34 


— 


2,438 


2,789 


1,264 


1 


28,9897 


28,9897 


— 


— 


— 


35 


146 

61531 
392 j 


9,221 
3,152 
8,046 

690,828 


4,854 

2,981 

10,901 

723,588 


3,438 
1,003 

141,887 


3 

4 

117 


9,2875 

63 
8,456 


9,2205 
2,924 


1,391 


— 


3 
4 


36 

?>7 
38 

39 


765 


35,752 


30,116 


9,891 


15 


44 ■ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


40 


— 


2,407 


3,324 ^ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


41 


— 


28,867 


24,761 


10,980 


22 


7,800 


7,800 


— 


— 


20 


42 


dmals. 


6 Visits. 


7 Attendance. 

















84 



P.D. I. 
Abstracts of Reports of Prii'0 



11 



13 



Name and Address 



Boston — Con. 
Needle Woman's Friend Society, 229 Berkeley St. 
New England Anti-Vivisection Society, The, 6 

Park St. 
New England Baptist Hospital, 91 Parker Hill 

Ave., Roxbury (275 beds) .... 

New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign 

Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, 581 Boylston St. . _. 
New England Deaconess Association, 141 Milk St. 

(See also Attleboro, Concord and Natick) 
New England Deaconess Hospital, 16 Deaconess 

Rd. (314 beds) ... ... 

New England Farm and Garden Association Inc., 

39 Newbury St. 

New England Grenfell Association, 25 Huntington 

Ave. ......... 

New England Heart Association .... 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, 161 

South Huntington Ave. ..... 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, 

Dimock St., Roxbury (185 beds) 
New England Kurn Hattin Homes, Westminster, 

Vermont ........ 

New England Salvage Stores for Palestine, Inc., 

1423 Washington St. ..... 

New England Watch and Ward Society, The, 41 

Mt. Vernon St. 

New England Zionist Region .... 
Newsboys Reading Room Association of Boston, The 
Nickerson Home for Children, 125 Townsend St., 

Roxbury ........ 

Norfolk House Centre, 14 John Eliot Sq., Roxbury 
North Bennet Street Industrial School, The, 39 

North Bennet St 

North End Dispensary, 517 Shawmut Ave. . 
Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable 

Association of Greater Boston, 20 Cushing Ave., 

Dorchester . . . . 

Norwegian Seamen's Mission of New England, 

170 Sumner St., East Boston* .... 
Nursery Training School of Boston, The (Rug- 

gles Street Nursery), 147 Ruggles St.2 . 
Nursery Training School of Boston, The (Teacher 

Training Dept.), 355 Marlborough St. 
Nutrition Clinics, Incorporated, 290 Common- 
wealth Ave. ....... 

Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy 

Musicians ........ 

Olivia James House, 521 E. Seventh St., South 

Boston ........ 

Orchard Home School, -31 Mt. Vernon St. . 
Order of Sir Galahad, Inc., The, 1 Joy St. ' . 
Order of the Fleur de Lis, Inc., 1 Joy St. . 
Ostroa Ladies Helping Hand Society, Inc. . 
Overseers of the Public Welfare in the City of 

Boston, The, 43 Hawkins St. .... 
Paine Foundation, The, 81 Arlington St. 
Pan-Albanian Federation of America "Vatra" 

(The Hearth) Inc., The 

Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul 

of the City of Boston, The, 7 Water St. . 
Penny Wise Thrift Shop, Inc., The, 235 Hunting- 
ton Ave. ........ 

Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated, Committee 

of the, 100 Franklin St 

Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of the 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 721 Huntington 

Ave. (250 beds) 

Phineas G. Parmenter Foundation, Inc.l 
Plymouth Hospital Corporation of Boston (not in 

operation) . . . . . . . 

Polish Home of The Little Flower, Inc., 17 Hale 

St., Hyde Park 

Preachers' Aid Society of the New England Annual 

Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church . 
Resthaven Corporation, 120 Fisher Ave., Roxbury 



Total 

Assets 
Reported 



$43,514 

163,493 

1,902,634 

69,937 

245,763 

3,069,206 

55,834 

581,076 
1,071 

1,919,904 

1,581,658 

11 

1,543 

218,433 

1,863 

32,459 

35,335 
121,935 

176,844 
24,184 

90,433 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



$201 

2,206 

49,768 

45,933 

2,223 

119,523 

3,484 

12,553 
604 

47,483 

60,783 

3,206 



2,212 

12,418 

3 

1,274 
36,778 

47,068 



1,334 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Inter 
Divide 

Annu 
and Re 



$2,997 

90 

431,839 

12,133 

675,618 

27,541 

1,833 

25,239 

240,107 

8,969 
1,832 



2,692 
4,594 

7,560 



3,192 



22,025 


11,356 


1,862 


37,605 


— 


29,449 


11,665 


— 


1,728 


34,745 


— 


— 


29,901 

126,272 

2,124 

194 

5 


11,373 

7,488 

1,813 

33 

415 


41 

6,624 

515 

74 
926 


561,634 
22,180 


25,315 


300 


— 


769 


— 


169,176 


260,611 


7,045 


3,681 


— 


9,841 


39,765 
111,805 


1,350 


— 


4,418,007 


183,200 


312,350 


3,699 


— 


— 


82,156 


5,706 


5,109 


1,035,782 
59,323 


8,225 
6,217 


6,750 



4,2 



17,5 
1,1 
20, 

69,4 
32,2 



8 
1,9 

4,4 



— 20,4 



186,5 
4,3 

71,0 



34,7! 
2! 



None. 



1 No report. 



Report for 1 5 months. 3 Restricted to capital. 4 Not stated. 



..'. 


















85 


^able 


Corporations — Continued. 














cies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Waees 


Paid 

Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given To 




Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




- 


$8,077 


$8,489 


$2,938 


2 


45 


45 











1 


51 


43,172 


18,744 


5,991 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


>7 


438,953 


411,147 


143,476 


167 


6,032 


125 


— 


— 


— 


3 


)03) 

: K J 


47,179 


49,044 


325 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


. \i 


27,736 


24,534 


1,412 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


a :6 3 


807,632 


802,618 


438,248 


405 


10,093 


689 


— 


— 


— 


6 


I .03) 

f 36 } 

1 263) 
1:38 j 


32,735 

47,372 
604 

172,739 


33,732 

24,829 
660 

157,191 


5,877 
4,678 

83,542 


5 
3 

62 


880 


582 


— 


1,070 


1 
2 

2 


7 

8 
9 

10 


: .3 


329,075 


340,210 


194,201 


238 


25,409 


3,558 


— 


— 


— 


11 


|- 


3,206 


3,201 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


12 


1- 


8,969 


9,068 


4,120 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


13 


r 


15,733 

14,250 

2,192 


11,388 

13,346 

2,536 


7,524 

1,105 
260 


3 

1 
1 


230 


230 


— 


— 


3 


14 
15 
16 


■7, 


4,782 
44,355 


4,753 
41,083 


1,569 

20,282 


4 
42 


53 


7 


36 


4,983 


5 


17 
18 


lz 


59,121 


57,619 


41,917 


68 


5,640 


5,094 


— 


— 


3 


19 
20 




6,420 


6,621 


825 


5 


25 


11 


— 


— 


— 


21 
22 


- 


13,219 


11,692 


7,882 


8 


90 


2 


— 


— 


2 


23 


- 


29,474 


25,301 


18,154 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


24 


- 


1,728 


5,765 


4,262 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25 





911 


889 


— 


— 


14 


14 


— 


— 


— 


26 


)0 


7,251 

18,443 

3,328 

123 

1,341 


7,692 

22,862 

2,882 

131 

1,372 


6,130 

10,088 
964 

58 


7 
9 
2 

2 


101 

4 


4 

4 


— 4 


533 
800- 


— 


27 

28 
29 
30 
31 


— 


20,493 
4,728 


16,434 
4,325 


1,200 


1 


87 
2 


87 
2 


— 


— 


14 


32 
33 


)03) 
K0 \ 


769 
307,298 


773 
274,688 


226 
8,406 


2 
2 


— 


— 


12,481 


— 


— 


34 
35 


— 


9,874 


9,965 


2,281 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


36 


— 


187,909 
4,338 


178,750 
4,338 


9,600 
• 750 


3 
1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


118 

1 


5 7 
38 


— 


538,453 


617,467 


340,852 


358 


11,136 


2,062 


— 


— 


— 


59 

40 

41 
42 


- — 


10,907 


6,225 


622 


2 


77 


41 


— 


— 


— 


— 


43,016 
13,181 


38,917 
16,085 


3,420 
5,062 


2 
9 


130 

78 


130 
18 


— 


— 


— 


45 
44 



86 



P.Dl 

Abstracts of Reports of Pr 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Intt 
Divit 

Ann 
and I 



22 
23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 
30 

31 

32 
33 
34 

35 

36 



Boston — Con. 
Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables, 125 

Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury (115 beds) . . $2,078,215 $43,904 

Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc., 11 Windsor St., 

Roxbury 251,601 20,641 

Robert Treat Paine Association, The . . . 112,865 

Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc. . . . 79,349 

Roxbury Charitable Society, The . . . . 111,828 939 

Roxburv Home for Aged Women, 5 Burton Ave., 

Roxbury . . 466,326 725 

Roxbury Ladies Aid and Fuel Society, The, 532 

Warren St., Roxbury3 . . . . . 12,443 6,174 

Roxbury Neighborhood House Association, 858 

Albany St 105,295 19,119 

Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. ... 38,053 

Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association, 8 Pine St.l 
Rutland Corner House, 453 Shawmut Ave. . 112,836 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses Alumnae As- 
sociation, Incorporated ..... 6,485 749 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston, 736 Cam- 
bridge St., Brighton (250 beds) . . . 1,221,395 65,722 
Saint Joseph's Home, 321 Centre St., Dorchester 91,053 565 
St. Luke's Home for Convalescents, 149 Roxbury 

St., Roxbury 400,004 3,824 

St. Mark Social Center, Inc., 216 Townsend St., 

Roxbury .; 1,206 1,787 

Saint Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in-Hospital, 

90 Cushing Ave., Dorchester (100 beds) . 305,104 13,294 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

(Administrative, Welfare & Religious Depts.), 

8 East Brookline St 1,991,360 288,608 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

(Men's Social Service), 8 East Brookline St. . 476,968 17,864 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

(Men's Lodging Houses), 8 East Brookline St. 175,000 14,815 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

(Evangeline Booth Home & Hospital), 202 W. 

Newton St. (75 beds) 161,173 36,026 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, 

The (Nursery & Settlement), 17 Staniford St. 12,756 6,898 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, 

The (Camp Wonderland, Sharon) . . . 273,369 44,457 

Sanders Fund, Inc 380 12,436 

Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children . 192,694 58 

Scandinavian Sailors' Home, Inc., 46 Water St., 

Charlestown 2,590 2,816 

Scientific Temperance Federation, The, 400 Boyl- 

ston St 13,263 3,364 

Scollay Square Service Club (Incorporated) . 10,969 — 

Scots Charitable Society, The, 100 Milk St. . 79,130 698 

Sears and other Funds, Trustees of the . . 222,136 — 

Settlements Museum Association, 36 Rutland St. . 8,260 3,093 

Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children . . . 587,903 — 

Simmons Club of Boston 370 ' 324 

Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, 

Inc. . . 477 766 

Sisters of Lord Beaconsfield Aid Society, Inc.l 
Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and 

Colored People in Massachusetts, Inc., The, 

60 Vernon St . 81,315 1,842 

Snider Foundation 8,336 165 

Society for Ministerial Relief. 25 Beacon St. . 400,016 2,609 

Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled 

Episcopal Clergymen ..... 164,928 — 

Society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans 

of Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal 

Church, 1 Joy St 239,722 3,000 

Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home), 

125 Highland St., Roxbury (21 beds) . . 87,554 7,453 
Solomon M. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St. . 1,509,338 — 
South Boston Samaritan Society . . . 1,000 14 
South End Day Nursery, The, 25 Dover St. . 90,561 6,324 
South End Day Nursery Auxiliary . . . 8,724 402 
South End Diet Kitchen of Boston, The, 25 Ben- 
net St ... 78,314 — 

South End House Association, The, 20 Union 

„ Park St 335,370 29,143 

South End Music School, The, 32 Rutland St. . 58,385 6,550 



$86,557 

7,307 
609 



500 

3,034 

700 

214 

252 

285,001 
16,800 

1,783 

276 

95,560 

95,022 

261,886 

52,410 

30,157 
2,289 

107 

1,114 
563 
32 
279 
798 
714 

2,439 



$50 

5 
2 
3 
4 

17 



.— 


15, 


— 


14, 


— 


9, 


3,262 
1,989 


3, 
80, 


566 
1,842 


2, 


— 


3, 


5,698 
5,397 


6, 



-- None. 



No report. 



2 Not stated. 3 Name changed to Greater Boston Aid & Fuel Society 



ill. 

ritable Corporations 



87 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 


Indi- 


Indi- 


viduals 


viduals 


Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



.181,505 $181,563 $112,211 



156 



1,496 



581 



140 


29,645 
3,506 
3,494 
9,688 . 


30,593 
2,811 
3,358 
9,892 


17,795 
50 


17 

2 


1 - 


1 


329 


1504 


18,962 


17,588 


7,467 


9 


23 


— 


— 


6114 


9,399 


9,552 


1,592 


2 


— 


— 


1,825 


— 


21,653 
673 


23,570 
178 


15,004 


17 


— 


— 


— 


400 


6,053 


6,138 


3,161 


4 


18 


12 


— 


— 


1,132 


732 


50 


1 


— 


— 


— 


709 


357,354 
17,365 


358,573 
16,353 


175,172 
3,649 


138 
10 


11,767 

46 


2,066 


— 


074 


21,196 


22,035 


10,579 


12 


418 


82 


— 


— 


2,064 


1,998 


198 


1 


— 


— 


— 


094 


124,235 


126,233 


56,673 


77 


1,581 


14 


— 


5464 


386,207 


385,495 


134,146 


319 


— 


— 


3,752 


— 


281,711 


281,711 


118,482 


87 


17,6285 


12,1685 


— 


— 


67,226 


67,226 


28,915 


36 


372 


— 


— 


— 


66,369 


64,770 


23,686 


55 


1,820 


131 


— 


— 


9,187 


9,203 


4,495 


8 


41 


— 


— 


5224 


44,457 

12,543 

8,324 


44,624 

15,357 

8,553 


9,644 
1,200 
7,200 


101 
4 
4 


2,486 

105 

27 


2,486 
105 

27 


9 


— 


4,163 


3,907 


1,800 


2 


1,355 


442 


— 


200 


4,078 
347 
5,025 
7,063 
3,484 
20,736 
1,122 


4,107 
258 
4,203 
7,124 
3,484 
19,708 
1,023 


2,777 

108 

300 

500 

2,780 

4,265 


2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 


132 

1 

1,256 

252 


132 

1 

1,256 

252 


93 



5004 
114 

!,500 



1,494 



2,948 



6,554 


6,405 


1,050 


1 


405 


150 


— 


— 


8,287 


18,107 


200 


2 



14,009 



12,282 

13,649 

82,782 

44 

9,899 

2,500 

3,791 

41,495 
14,745 



13,287 



12,560 

14,671 

84,768 

44 

10,842 

4,821 

4,125 

41,144 
14,483 



5,010 
36,948 

7,193 



24,490 
10,653 



9 
129 



50 
1,731 



51 



372 



— 1,200 



400 



15 



1,648 



19 



406 



17 



Restricted to capital. 5 Census. 6 Massachusetts Corps 



ss 



P.D. 
Abstracts of Reports of Prk 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Inter* •;!:■ 
Divide' 

Annui 
and Re: ; 



10 



13 



43 



47 



Boston — Con. 
Stearns Fund, Inc. 1 ...... 

Students' Aid Foundation, Incorporated, The 
Students House Corporation, 96 The Fenway 
Sunnyside Day Nursery, The, 16 Hancock St. . 
Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem"), 169 Town- 
send St., Roxbury 

Swiss Benevolent Society ..... 
Syrian and Lebanese Community Centre of Boston, 

Inc., The ........ 

Syrian Child Welfare Society, Inc., The 1 . 
Svrian Ladies' Aid Society, The, 44 West Newton 

St 

Taadood Melkite Catholic Society of Greater 

Boston, Inc., The, 178 Harrison Ave. 
Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 
Talitha Cumi Home, The, 215 Forest Hills St., 

Jamaica Plain ...... 

Three-fold Movement — League of Neighbors, Fel- 
lowship of Faiths, Union of East and West 

(Incorporated), The 1 ..... 

Thrift Shop of Boston, Inc., The, 90 Huntington 

Ave. ......... 

Tide Over League, Inc., 462 Boylston St. . 
Travelers Aid Society of Boston, Inc., 481 South 

Station ........ 

Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel Allen 

Memorial), 135 South Huntington Ave. 2 
Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery, 

406 Meridian St., East Boston .... 
Uncle Elmer's Song Circle, Inc. 4 
Union Rescue Mission, The, 1 Dover St. . 
Unitarian Foundation, Inc., 25 Beacon St. 1 . 
Unitarian Service Pension Society, The, 25 Beacon 

St. . 

Vernon Advent Christian Home Inc., South 

Vernon, Vermont ...... 

Veterans' Charitable Legal Association, Inc., 619 

Washington St. ....... 

Village Club, Inc., The 1 .... 

Vincent Memorial Hospital, The, 125 South 

Huntington Ave. (21 beds) .... 
Voluntary Defenders Committee, Inc., 8 Beacon St. 
Volunteers of America, Inc. of Massachusetts, 

25 Hanover St. . . . 

Washingtonian Home, 41 Waltham St.3 
Wells Memorial Association, 985 Washington St. 
West End House Alumni Association, Inc., 16 

Blossom St. . . ... 

West End House, Inc., The, 16 Blossom St. 
West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association, 

The 

West End Young Mens Hebrew Association, 165 

Cambridge St. ...... 

Westminster Foundation, Inc. 1 .... 

Widows' Society in Boston ..... 

William Lawrence Camp, Inc. .... 

Winchester Home for Aged Women 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 

Society . . . . _ . 

Woman s Auxiliary of the New England Baptist 

Hospital 

Woman's Board of Missions, 14 Beacon St. 

Woman's Charity Club, The, 53 Parker Hill Ave., 
Roxbury ........ 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the' New 
England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church (Cooper Community Centre), 36 
Williams St., Roxbury 1 ..... 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New 
England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church (Medical Mission), 36 Hull St. . 

Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 

Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of 
Massachusetts, The, 16 Beacon St. . 

Women's Civic Federation of Massachusetts, Inc.," 
39 Newbury St. ' 



$26,310 

115,500 

45,802 


$6,716 


$3,127 
533 


11,011 
2,938 


175 
144 


38 
7 


95 


25 


112 


12,606 


810 


2,404 


197 
978 


804 


2,696 


316,748 


12,878 


4,268 



2,437 
1,449 


4,270 
430 


16,263 
10,750 


40,674 


23,183 


3,044 


185,302 


4,330 


6,025 


28,426 
10,005 
81,757 


11,328 

930 

8,315 


892 

1,893 

23 


707,638 


501 


8,643 


60,313 


758 


2,577 


200 


207 


43 


687,001 
2,497 


24,895 
5,122 


5,543 


101,629 

119,652 

62,637 


57,695 
2,400 
9,773 


11,742 

10,054 

9,151 


4,253 
458,369 


2,776 
1,766 


4,678 
6,669 


30 


585 


185 


5,365 


105 


22 


314,263 
25,937 


4,432 
1,616 


60 
10,120 


47,936 


1,671 


78 


342 


1,154 


56 


428,087 


14,899 


— 


374,258 


2,612 


884 



121,497 
14,246 


13,513 
1,016 


56,870 


4,609 


3,587 


4,246 



4,036 



7,152 






$7 



9,1. 



1,6; 

4,9! 

3i 

2: 
1< 



1,6: 



13,91 



13,37 



12,81 



None. i No report. 2 Report for 10 months. 



Name changed to Washingtonian Hospital. 



itable Corporations — Continued. 



89 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 







Families 




Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$3,875 

7,898 

213 
223 

138 



3,310 

5 
3,501 

26,299 



771 
127 



$3,191 

7,810 

214 
198 

42 

3,409 

3,189 
28,954 



$4,937 



476 



14,198 



23 



277 



197 



20,533 
11,180 


22,271 
10,379 


3,950 
4,905 


3 
5 


263 


263 


— 


28,852 


29,918 


20,428 


15 


18,216 


18,216 


— 


13,153 


13,293 


6,249 


9 


23 


— 


— 


12,558 
3,036 
8,675 


10,899 

2,674 

11,421 


7,795 

241 

5,560 


11 
3 
3 


5 


5 


160 
146 
— 5 


19,154 


9,097 


100 


2 


90 


90 


— 


4,984 


5,738 


2,277 


4 


17 


6 


— 


250 


308 


— 


— 


400 


385 


— 


57,003 
5,122 


47,239 
4,629 


21,401 
3,983 


23 
3 


267 
332 


160 
332 


— 


69,469 

15,242 
18,925 


69,230 
18,887 
19,769 


17,541 

9,225 

12,234 


18 

12 
32 


5 

494 


5 

2 


— 5 


7,455 
22,350 


5,780 
24,166 


200 
12,610 


1 

28 


— 


— 


— 



805 
826 



17,872 
11,737 


16,421 
11,392 


1,200 
2,249 


1 

28 


98 
122 


3,665 


2,388 


— 


— 


23 


1,210 


985 


— 


— 


— 


28,275 


27,972 


249 


1 


— 


3,497 


3,142 


— 


— 


— 



23 



17,549 17,153 

1,331 1,924 

7,106 7,327 

11,454 11,207 



12,025 
1,200 



3,016 



17,241 



843 



1,506 
1,100 



— 279 



98 



10 



9,936 — — 



23 



12 



43 



ort for 16 months. 



5 Not stated. 



6 Restricted to capital. 



90 



P.QL 

Abstracts of Reports of Pr% \ 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Inter 
Divide 

Annu 
and Re 



Boston — Con. 

1 Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 264 

Boylston St. _ _ . . . . . 

2 Women's Municipal League Committees, Incor- 

porated, 3 Joy St. . . . . 

3 Women's Palestine Agricultural Association Inc. 

(The Palagrass) ...... 

4 Women's Scholarship Association! 

5 Women's Service Club of Boston, 464 Massachu- 

setts Ave. ........ 

6 Woodberry Memorial Trust. 14 Beacon St. . 
Wood Memorial Home, Inc. .... 

S Working Girls Home, The, 89 Union Park St. . 
9 Young Men's and Young Women's Armenian As- 
sociation of Massachusetts, The 

10 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston, 108 

Seaver St., Roxbury ...... 

11 Young Traveller's Aid Society, The 

12 Young Yiggianese Club of East Boston 

Bourne 

13 Barnstable County Public Health Association, 

Incorporated ....... 

Boxford 

14 Female Charitable Society of West Boxford 

Braintree 

15 Braintree Visiting Nurse Association . 

16 Braintree Young Men's Christian Association 

17 Norfolk County Health Association, Inc. 

Bridgewater 

18 Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association 

Brockton 

19 Brockton Day Nurserv, 39 Everett St. 

20 Brockton Girl Scouts, Inc., 153 Main St. . 

21 Brockton Hospital Company, 680 Centre St. (126 

beds) ; 

22 Brockton Humane Society, The, 226 Pearl St. 

23 Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational As- 

sociation, Inc. ....... 

24 Brockton Social Service Council, Inc., 196 Main 

St 

25 Brockton Visiting Nurse Association, 231 Main St. 

26 Brockton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 

320 Main St. . . . . ! 

27 Brockton Young Women's Christian Association! 

465 Main St [ 

28 Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nu'rseryj 

Trustees of the, 39 Everett St 

> Family Welfare Association of Brockton, 19 L St 1 

30 Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton, 

Trustees of the, 892 Belmont St. . 

31 Joubeilite Great League Incorporated . 

32 Pettee-Chace Scholarship Fund 

33 Pilgrim Foundation, The, 1106 Main St. '. '. 

34 Plymouth County Health Association, Inc., 106 

Main St. ...... 

Squanto Council, Inc., Boy' Scouts of America,' 
86 Mam St 

36 Wales Home for Aged Women, The, *553 North 

Main St. ..... 

37 Woman's Club of Brockton ....'. 

Brookline 

38 Brookline Council of Girl Scouts, Inc. 

39 Brookline Friendly Society, The 

40 Brooks Hospital (51 beds) ....'. 

41 Christian Science Benevolent Association," The 

(146 beds) .... 

42 Free Hospital for Women (101 beds) . 

43 Jewish Women's Convalescent Home Association! 

44 \\ e Ten, Inc. .... 

45 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Al'lston- 

Brighton and Brookline 

— None. l No report. 2 Not stated. 



$808,215 


$48,902 


$665,847 


$ 


126 


8,858 


670 




65 


191 


2,435 




11,144 

35,371 

1,943,618 

328,535 


1,321 


2,698 

176 
57,389 


1, 
183, 


9,393 


820 


55 




109,087 
26,784 


11.380 
35 


12,449 


1, 


4,043 


3,893 


— 




755 


144 


639 




2,990 
1,680 
4,894 


1,952 
19,708 


3,246 
206 





14,876 



340 



1.410 



26,452 
7,069 


1,840 
1,568 


892 

3,545 


1, 


1,116,535 

10,955 


25,203 
214 


187,752 
34 


15,' 


— 


— 


1,188 




16,447 


78,922 


— 




58,527 


9,526 


7,531 


1,' 


570,677 


10,463 


58,388 


1,<' 


184,279 


10,844 


6,309 


1,! 


20,951 


— 


— 





246,095 

2,299 
958,663 


51 


101 
320 


6,: 

37,i 


1,352 


11,087 


4,755 




12,437 


4,268 


6,023 




185,802 
30,083 


466 
2,658 


29 
1,033 


4,; 


243 
160,274 

300,699 


1,089 
16,736 
11,514 


439 

5,549 
107,260 


6,i 


1,729,723 


149,693 


222,654 


7,. 


3,486,024 


34,716 


55,042 


107,1 


543 


1,792 


1,949 




95 


— 


547 





3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Visits. 



91 



table 


Corporations — Continued. 
















cies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


ERVICE OS 


. Relief 


jIVEN To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




|p3 


$715,619 


$721,727 


$230,374 


327 


23,400 


22,090 






98 


1 


- 


9,528 


9,419 


4,531 


12 


— 


— 


— 


188 


— 


2 


- 


2,626 


2,565 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


3 
4 


- 


4,019 

1,492 

183,894 

57,529 


3,821 

18 

5,030 

57,560 


959 
20,166 


3 
29 


935 


3 


400 
10 


— 


— 


5 
6 
7 
8 


- 


995 


1,527 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


9 




24,283 

1,166 

35 


24,411 

1,200 
35 


13,905 


11 


— 


— 


— 


1,999 


1 


10 

11 

12 


- 


3,914 


4,000 


1,395 


7 


37 


37 


— 


— 


17 


13 




784 


368 


— 


— 


— 


— 


. _ 


— 


— 


14 


— 


5,217 

50 

19,915 


4,671 


3,501 


4 


4,665* 


9094 


— 


— 


— 


15 
16 
17 


- 


17,849 


3,275 


2 


207 


207 


42 


— 


— 


- 


2,058 


2,179 


1,700 


2 


2,2364 


2224 


15 


— 


— 


18 


_ 


3,894 
5,113 


4,450 
4,976 


1,632 
1,740 


5 
13 


5,7745 


— 2 





— 


— 


19 

20 





228,795 
720 


236,407 
1,856 


123,967 
1,380 


150 
2 


9,453 
5,0366 


1,433 


— 


— 


— 


21 

22 


— 


1,188 


1,563 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


23 


5 
D03) 

)0 1 


79,157 


83,045 


3,824 


13 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


24 


18,639 


20,862 


18,228 


14 


21,5804 


— 2 


— 


— 


2 


25 


- 


70,676 


71,750 


40,298 


27 


— 


— 


— 


479 


45 


26 




19,063 


19,525 


11,997 


10 


— 


— 


6 


1,323 


17 


27 




362 


342 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


28 
29 


— 


6,215 
320 
179 

37,545 


6,167 

320 

125 

46,890 


2,222 
2,080 


6 
1 


7 
1 


1 


798 


— 


1 
10 


30 
31 
32 
33 


— 


15,843 


15,808 


3,100 


2 


106 


106 


— 


— 


— 


34 


1103) 
"9 J 


10,717 

16,098 
4,460 


10,886 

9,496 
4,504 


3,449 
3,939 


2 
6 


17 
231 


226 


7 


1,068 


8 


35 

36 
37 



1,528 

39,697 

118,774 

409,766 

225,636 

3,742 
547 



1,426 

30,765 

117,190 

421,103 

208,308 

3,740 

457 



695 

24,902 
59,771 

327,925 

107,970 



1 
19 
64 

229 

123 



11,6184 6,5784 
1,270 

3,89^ 103 

18,199 17,669 

92 —2 



155 



167 



443 



87 



10 



indance. 



Animals. 



92 



P.D; 

Abstracts of Reports of Pri 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Intei 
Divid 

Annt 
andR 



Cambridge 

Ames Foundation ...... 

Avon Home, The, 1000 Massachusetts Ave.l 

Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed Chari- 
table Loan Association, 178 Elm St. 

Cambridge Community Center, Inc., 49 Howard St. 

Cambridge Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 
18 Brattle St 

Cambridge Girl Scouts Inc., 1234 Massachusetts 
Ave 

Cambridge Hebrew Women's Aid Society, The 

Cambridge Homes for Aged People, 360 Mt. 
Auburn St. ...... 



Cambridge Hospital, 330 Mt. Auburn St. (214 beds) 
Cambridge Neighborhood House, 79 Moore St.3 
Cambridge-port Fruit and Flower Mission, The 
Cambridge Rotary Educational Fund Inc. . 
Cambridge Tuberculosis and Health Association 

689 Massachusetts Ave.l . . 

Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association, The 

35 Bigelow St 

Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association 

820 Massachusetts Ave 

Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association 

The, 7 Temple St.5 

East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts 

105 Spring St 

Ella Lyman Cabot Foundation, 21 Washington Ave 
Family Welfare Society of Cambridge, The, 763 

Massachusetts Ave. 6 ..... 
Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, 1563 Massachusetts 

Ave. . ...... 

Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables, The, 1575 

Cambridge St. (215 beds) 
Howard Benevolent Society of Cambridge, 763 

Massachusetts Ave. ..... 

Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc., 85 Otis St 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, 45 Guyette Rd. 
United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies of 

God, Inc., 59 Moore St 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 

Canton 

27 Canton Hospital and Nursing Association . 

28 Canton Playgrounds Association, The . 

Chatham 

29 Chatham Visiting Nurse Association, Incorporated 

Chelsea 

30 Chebra Kadisha of Chelsea 

31 Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home, 148 

Shawmut St. ....... 

32 Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association, The 

33 Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home, 75 Ash St. 

34 Chelsea Memorial Hospital, 100 Bellingham St. 

(90 beds) 

35 Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, Inc., 

The \ 

36 Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association, 207 

Shurtleff St 

37 Chevra Bikur Cholim of Chelsea, 137 Shurtleff St. 

38 Chevra Mishna Free Loan of Congregation Shara 

Zion of Chelsea ....... 

39 Chevra Thilim & Gemilath Chesed Association,' 

Inc. of Chelsea ....... 

40 Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea, 109 

Th.ird St 

41 Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association '. '. 

42 Liberty Free Loan Association .... 

43 Mishner Free Loan Association .-.'!! 

44 Old Ladies Home Association of Chelsea, Massa- 

chusetts, 3 Nichols St 

45 Palou Reconstruction Union, The . ] '. 

Chicopee 

46 Laurel Hill Lodge, Inc., The2 .... 



$9,859 

7,392 
1,411 

1,565 

14,070 
1,151 

854,234 

1,737,731 

39,410 

1,369 

5,717 



78,544 
455,863 
279,340 



1,926 



26,464 



$687 
3,006 

7,240 

4,089 
2,300 

2,452 

115,976 

5,458 

192 



5,862 
19,699 
13,992 



1,834 



67 



$376 



16,063 
1,318 



9,684 
2,008 

3,443 

394,909 
213 

421 



9,204 
75,243 
23,640 



191 



4,478 



42,097 
6,920 
2,680 


1,010 
434 
568 


2,508 
9,209 


259,610 


2,370 


105,353 


329 


300 


709 


154,538 
196 


4,236 
1,886 


6,832 

50 


707 


165 


— 


6,916 


567 


17,900 


10,821 
1,136 
3,002 
6,445 


415 

4,566 

484 

271 


28,994 
1,663 
6,656 

14,010 


117,154 
6,222 


181 
6,438 


— 



31, 



33,307 
433,582 


6,075 
15,920 


1,333 
78 


18 


50,036 


12,469 


92 


1 


1,440 


1,001 


702 




994,036 


5,118 


119,298 


2 


8,875 
142,761 
377,533 


5,167 


71 
11,363 


2 


91,531 
719 


1,232 
1,649 


— 




5,306 
20,501 


2,102 


1,386 





None. 



1 Report not due. 



2 No report. 



3 Report for 6 months. 4 Restricted to capit ^ 



93 



itable Corporations — Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$1,105 



$4,207 



16,751 
4,324 


16,736 
5,196 


$249 
2,150 


1 
3 


230 


230 


— 


250 


5 


7,240 


6,534 


3,968 


2 


— 


— 


— 


883 


— 


13,872 
4,308 


13,067 
4,197 


4,764 


4 


— 


— 


45 


1,050 


20 


43,760 


37,128 


10,183 


16 


55 


— 


— 


— 


— 


532,412 

6,462 

226 

482 


524,354 

5,868 

227 

362 


262,323 
3,794 


339 
9 


9,230 
2 


1,318 

— 7 


83 


377 


— 


17,859 


18,683 


-11,540 


12 


17,7088 


6,8818 


— 








106,026 


101,026 


43,581 


50 


, — 


— 


— 


3,774 


28 


51,491 


47,781 


29,555 


41 


— 


— 


— 


729 


— 


7,638 
34,438 


7,300 
32,980 


5,020 
28,842 


5 
18 


— 


— 


— 


595 


2 
1 


13,819 


11,107 


3,924 


10 


— 


— 


447 


— 


— 


1,703 


1,510 


80 


2 


648 


433 


— 


— 


— 


186,063 


127,559 


43,546 


133 


353 


47 


— 


— 


— 


215 

71 

18,905 


186 

6,918 

19,089 


1,688 
5,144 


6 

5 


133 
103 


133 

5 


36 


— 


— 


1,232 
1,649 


1,245 
1,883 


116 
1,125 


3 
1 


— 


— 


250 


— 


1 


3,693 
597 


3,811 

707 


2,335 
330 


■3 

2 


4,4668 

— 7 


2,8218 

— 7 


— 


— 


— 



2,047 



2,051 



1,491 



944! 



5948 



4,612 



4,240 



365 



22 



3,885 

9,644 

568 


4,361 
9,739 

572 


1,974 

208 

50 


3 
1 
1 


18 

550 
900 


50 
900 


— 


109,513 


99,453 


48,826 


74 


3,190 


821 


— 


1,040 


2,580 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11,069 
1,936 


10,783 
1,965 


5,278 
135 


6 

2 


816 


816 


— 


165 


25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,467 


17,384 


122 


2 


352 


352 


— 


29,410 
6,230 
7,140 

14,282 


29,392 

5,552 

7,373 

13,440 


400 

50 
150 


3 

1 
1 


632 
155 


632 
155 


40 
325 


6,662 
6,438 


4,620 
215 


1,562 


2 


7 
200 


200 






550 



ort for 9 months. 



Report for 3 months. 7 Not stated. 



8 Visits. 



94 



p.q 

Abstracts of Reports of Pr\ 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Clinton 

1 Clinton District Nursing Association, Inc. . 

2 Clinton Home for Aged People, The . 

3 Clinton Hospital Association, The (62 beds) 

4 Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association . 

5 Wanocksett Girl Scout Camp, Inc., The 

Cohasset 

6 Beechwood Improvement Association, Incorporated, 

The . , . 

7 Bonnie Bairns Association ..... 

8 Cohasset Horse Show Association, Inc. 2 

9 Sandy Beach Association ..... 

Concord 

10 Concord Female Charitable Society, The 

11 Concord, Massachusetts, Girl Scouts, Incorporated, 

The4 

12 Concord's Home for the Aged . 

13 Emerson Hospital in Concord (35 beds) 

14 New England Deaconess Association (Home for 

Aged Methodist Women) ..... 

15 Women's Parish Association .... 

Dalton 

16 W. Murray Crane Community House, Trustees of 

The . . 

17 Young Mens Christian Association of Dalton 

18 Zenas Crane Fund for Student Aid Inc. . 

Danvers 

19 Danvers Home for the Aged .... 

20 Danvers Visiting Nurse Association . 

21 New England Home for Deaf Mutes (Aged Blind 

or Infirm), The ...... 

22 Putnam Home, Inc. ...... 

23 Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund Inc. 

Dedham 

24 Andrew H. Hodgdon Memorial Fund, Inc. . 

25 Dedham Community Association, Inc. . 

26 Dedham Emergency Nursing Association, The 

27 Dedham Federation, Incorporated? 

28 Dedham Temporary Home for Women and Children 

29 Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The 

Deerfield 

30 Allen-Chase Foundation 

Dennis 

31 Ladies' Aid Society of Dennis, Inc. 

DUXBURY 

32 Boys' Camp, Inc., The 

33 Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The 

34 National Sailors Home . . 

Easthampton 

35 Easthampton Home for Aged Women . 

36 Ella Clark Home for Aged People* 

37 Helping Hand Society 

Easton 

38 Eastondale Community Club* .... 

Edgartown 

39 Edgartown Boys Club Inc 

40 Martha's Vineyard Animal Rescue League, In- 

corporated 

Essex 

41 Camp Chebacco, Inc 

Everett 

42 Albert N. Parlin House, Inc., Webster and 

Church Sts 

43 Disabled Veterans' Camp Corporation, 473 Ferry St. 

— None. i No report. 2 Report for 16 months. 



$4,075 
166,191 

445,082 

8,353 

571 



2,834 

7,369 

17,561 

38,134 



26,248 



1,521 
3,225 

77 



110,000 
2,680 



$160 
568 

1,287 

965 

17 



1,465 



756 



642 
922 

4,200 
1,696 



$2,920 
759 



54,156 
1,190 



277 



525 
2,351 



23,035 
113,325 
192,299 


70 

56 

11,724 


1,561 
47,338 


35,000 
9,155 


775 
164 


6,032 
391 


221,922 
111,761 
155,531 


1,500 


325 


126,847 
31,016 


1,587 
1,078 


600 
1,243 


291,986 

52,317 

706 


8,474 

70 


1,237 

2,071 

862 


15,572 
41,602 
35,155 


2,988 
9,554 


32,652 
2,879 


72,179 
11,025 


9,453 
2,228 


8,006 
154 


42,948 


3,586 


10,073 


2,634 


40 


447 


40,039 

597 

333,153 


20,615 

1,331 

5 


13,835 
393 
965 


15,912 


546 


892 


14,613 


2,219 


1,357 



259 
1,288 



14 



3 Restricted to capital. 4 Report for 11m 



95 



•{table Corporations — Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$3,179 
14,205 

63,673 
1,306 
1,218 



285 



1,725 



$3,110 
7,078 

69,181 
1,918 
1,142 



290 



295 



$2,989 
2,402 

37,000 

295 



50 



2,8416 
12 



1,342 
86 



901 


892 


372 


1 


— 


2,217 


1,998 


753 


3 


1,241 


4,201 


4,331 


1,305 


15 


180 



102 



206 
452 



1,990 
2,671 


2,673 
1,698 


1,153 


3 


— 


— 


3,735 


1,817 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,631 

4,824 
58,933 


1,575 

3,815 

54,536 


435 

1,506 

23,396 


1 

5 

32 . 


5 
1,670 


219 


14,061 
868 


12,279 
906 


3,008 


7 


17 


— 


4,191 
4,954 
6,302 


4,588 
5,061 
6,312 


20 


1 


26 


22 


5,984 
8,762 


5,841 

3,558 


2,424 
2,295 


4 

2 


10 
4,4786 


1,6096 


18,736 

3,222 
872 


17,416 

3,288 

805 


6,029 

1,107 

25 


7 
4 
1 


27 

48 

8 


1 
8 


366 
35,649 
13,223 . 


50 
37,174 
14,360 


1,846 
8,769 


1 
8 


1 
6,3266 


1 
3,3316 


21,910 
2,638 


23,174 
3,779 


9,966 
1,325 


11 

1 


380 


— 


13,659 


10,001 


6,488 


4 


106 


1 


521 


586 


10 


2 


— 


— 


34,460 
1,724 
5,986 


29,271 

1,562 

13,916 


11,852 
1,192 
2,700 


36 
1 
6 


1,156 
4496 
27 


466 
486 

23 


4,853 


8,284 


1,656 


3 


3 


— 


3,825 


3,732 


1,887 


3 


3,5876 


2,7266 



180 



lU. 



10 



50 



94 



15 



206 — 



19,584 



412 



72 



: stated. 



6 Visits. 



7 Report not due. 8 Animals. 



% 



RD 

Abstracts of Reports of Pri "' 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Inte: 
Divid 

Anni 
andR 



Everett — Con. 

1 Everett Cottage Hospital, 103 Garland St. (94 beds) 

2 Everett Home for Aged Persons, 14 Hosmer St. . 

3 Everett Young Men's Christian Association . 

4 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett 

Fairhaven 

5 Community Nurse Association of Fairhaven 

6 East Fairhaven Catholic Association, Inc. . 

7 Fairhaven Benevolent Association 

8 Fairhaven King's Daughters Home for the Aged, 

Inc. ......... 

9 Ladies Benevolent Society, The .... 

Fall River 

10 Animal Rescue League of Fall River, 452 Durfee St. 

11 Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da 

Santissima Trindade, 207 Rhode Island Ave. . 

12 Bishop Stang Day Nursery, The, 217 Third St. . 

13 Boys Club of Fall River, 375 Ana wan St. . 

14 Catholic Memorial Home, The, 394 Highland Ave, 

15 Children's Home of Fall River, 427 Robeson St. 

16 District Nursing Association of Fall River, In- 

corporated, 14 Bank St. .... 

17 Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society, The, 14 

Bank St 

18 Fall River Branch of the American Association of 

University Women, The (excluding Ninth Street 
Day Nursery), 37 Ninth St. . . . 

19 Fall River Branch of the American Association of 

University Women, The (Ninth Street Day 
Nursery), 37 Ninth St 

20 Fall River Council of Girl Scouts, Inc., 14 Bank St. 

21 Fall River Deaconess Home, The, 825 Second St. 

22 Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Institution 1 

23 Fall River High School Alumni Scholarships, 

Trustees of ....... 

24 Fall River Jewish Community Center Building, 

Inc., 456 South Main St 

25 Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc., 46 

Forest St 

26 Fall River Rescue & Gospel Mission, Inc., 34 

North Seventh St.l 

27 Fall River Women's Union, 101 Rock St. . 

28 Family Welfare Association of Fall River, 14 

Bank St 

29 Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, 621 Second St. 

30 Hebrew Free School Society .... 

31 Home for Aged People in Fall River, 1168 High- 

land Ave. ........ 

32 Junior League of Fall River Inc., 187 Rock St. . 

33 Mt. Lebanon Society, 341 Quequechan St. . 

34 Roosevelt Infantile Paralysis Commission, Incor- 

porated, of Fall River, The* .... 

35 St. Anne's Hospital Corporation, 795 Middle St. 

(100 beds) 

36 Saint Joseph's Orphanage, 56 St. Joseph St. 

37 Saint Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River, 

The, 2860 North Main St 

38 Servants of Relief for Incurable Cancer, The, 

Woodman and Bay Sts. (88 beds) . 

39 Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The, 1820 Highland Ave. 

(128 beds) . . . . 

40 Union Hospital in Fall River, 538 Prospect St. 

(171 beds) . . . . . . 

41 War Veterans Civic Association of Massachusetts, 

Inc., 103 South Main St 

42 Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Fall 

River ......... 

43 Young Men's Christian Association of Fall River,' 

199 North Main St 

Falmouth 

44 Falmouth Institute* 

45 Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated' '. 

46 Lawrence High School Scholarship Association, 

Inc. of Falmouth, Mass., The .... 



$114,772 

39,970 

95 

400 



2,433 

583 

52,401 

44,575 
3,511 



77,468 



151 



36,956 

6,459 

84,141 



79,622 
20,465 
25,001 

163,170 

52,416 

14,958 

505 

790,958 
3,450 
5,300 



226,673 
400,082 

208,715 

212,829 

1,407,690 

2,142,637 

1,365 

3,127 

276,423 

23,045 
2,235 



$332 
368 


$164,526 


$1, 
1, 


146 


510 




1,975 
29 

24 


2,064 
408 


2, 


212 
15 


1,814 
346 


2, 



22 



117 



821 

1,017 
5,935 



1,536 
2,052 

2,015 

1,707 

2,411 
2,175 
1,587 

1,256 
911 
489 



100 
7,864 

17,908 

15,602 



1,130 

1,881 

297 

5,672 

460 
300 



1,585 



1,539 

71,822 

500,800 

355,088 

473,272 


82 

55 

5,022 

14,286 

127 


352 

979 

9,261 

3,268 


10, 

1, 

16, 


134,017 


13,426 


17,824 


11, 


27,681 


4,208 


— 





64 



1,925 

4,521 
1,422 



695 
4,833 

2,309 

728 

3,450 

479 

9,966 
2,797 
1,316 



57,864 
25,057 

6,650 

200,087 

159,002 

2,074 

35 

15,629 

8,178 



27,1 



5,: 



None. i No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Restricted to capital. 4 Visits. 5 Animals. 



■ 

II. 


















< 


71 


writable Corporations — Continued. 














igacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief 


Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




<?,0003) 
177 j 


$166,707 
2,085 


$168,239 

3,165 

55 

891 


$67,754 
720 


120 
1 


3,383 

4 

30 


9 


— 


— 


— 


l 

2 
3 
4 


— . 


667 


— 


— 


— 


8 


— 


— 2 


— 


4,039 

438 

2,476 


4,462 

225 

2,801 


3,286 
480 


3 
1 


6,306* 
30 


2,7714 
30 


45 


— 


1 


5 
6 
7 


— 


4,512 
365 


4,221 
408 


1,580 


4 


11 


— 


3 


— 


2 


8 
9 


— 


6,599 


6,477 


4,229 


4 


5,0725 


4,8475 


— 


— 


— 


10 


400 

100 
2513 


434 

1,517 

24,372 

16,514 

20,089 


431 
939 

24,619 
1,552 

19,337 


19 

15,987 

7,947 


2 

16 

8 


50 
95 

22 


10 
8 

7 


10 


2,600 


— 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


— 


42,865 


46,856 


36,962 


25 


42,3274 


20,1974 


— 


— 


— 


16 


— 


4,438 


6,595 


1,717 


15 


128 


128 


— 


— 


— 


17 


— 


182 


180 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


18 


,L,5003 


3,689 
5,779 
9,587 


4,330 

5,859 

11,842 


1,942 
2,116 
3,605 


4 
3 
8 


44 
39 


2 

21 


51 


1,041 


10 


19 

20 
21 
22 


8353 


4,708 


. 5,014 


— 


— 


21 


21 


— 


— 


— 


23 


— 


2,747 


2,746 


1,633 


3 


— 


— 


— 


350 


— 


24 


— 


6,849 


6,287 


1,418 


4 


20 


14 


— 


— 


— 


25 
26 


863 


8,103 


8,649 


5,142 


23 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


27 


— 


5,916 

5,829 
2,066 


7,383 
5,950 
1,970 


4,136 
1,690 


3 
2 


1,564 
43 


1,564 

— 2 


814 
151 




— 


28 
29 
30 


8513 


39,038 
3,737 
1,806 


29,435 
2,362 
2,444 


12,529 
52 


15 
1 


44 
1,520 


— 


100 


— 


6 


31 
32 
33 

34 


— 


57,964 
35,593 


57,892 
34,067 


21,914 
12,402 


79 
26 


2,516 

523 


857 
115 


— 


— 


— 


35 
36 


,5,950 


31,251 


24,043 


4,402 


16 


217 


146 


— 


— 


— 


37 


— 


15,602 


13,365 


2,657 


12 


241 


241 


— 


— 


— 


38 


— 


223,815 


236,314 


78,339 


96 


2,645 


476 


— 


— 


— 


39 


i,3,3223 


225,126 


222,142 


101,999 


131 


4,007 


1,047 


— 


— 


— 


40 


— 


3,956 


3,317 


60 


1 


— 


— 


17 


— 


6 


41 


— 


420 


390 


100 


1 


18 


— 


— 


— 


— 


42 


— 


27,029 


29,592 


15,439 


17 


" 


_ 




724 




43 
44 


— 


8,824 


7,578 


5,579 


5 


1,9324 


2 


— 


— 


— 


45 


— 


335 


344 


— 


— 


3 


3 


— 


— 


— 


46 



os 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Prin 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Intere: 
Dividen 

Annuit 
and Ren 



10 



25 



30 



FlTCHBURG 

Burbank Hospital, Nichols St. (220 beds) . 

Emergency Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Inc. . 

Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg, The, 
9 Prichard St 

Fitchburg Community Chest, Inc., 520 Main St. 

Fitchburg Council of Girl Scouts, Inc., 28 Grove St. 

Fitchburg Helping Hand Association, 35 Holt St. 

Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies, 30 Cedar St. 

New England French American Home, 163 South 
St _ . . ... 

Northern Worcester County Public Health Associa- 
tion, Inc., 56 Elm St. . . 

Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The, 
16 Hart well St. ....... 

Wachusett Children's Aid Society, 47 Holt St. 

Young Mens Christian Association of Fitchburg, 
525 Main St 



FOXBOROUGH 

13 Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, Inc. 

14 Memorial Hospital Corporation (not in operation) 

Framingham 

15 Bethel Home for the Aged . . 

16 Christian Workers' Union .... 

17 Framingham Civic League, Inc. . 

18 Framingham Community Chest, Inc. . 

19 Framingham Community Health Association, In- 

corporated ....... 

20 Framingham Hospital (not in operation) 

21 Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., The (130 beds) 

22 Home for Aged Men and Women in Framingham 

23 Southwestern Middlesex Public Health Associa- 

tion, Inc. ........ 

24 Union Avenue Hospital Inc. (not in operation) . 

Franklin 
Fletcher Hospital, The Trustees of The (not in 

operation) ........ 

Frances Eddy King Student Fund, Inc., The 
Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin, 

Thel 

Gardner 
Gardner Home for Elderly People, The, 162 

Pearl St 

Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital, The, 242 

Green St. (81 beds) 

Monadnock Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

54 Main St 



Georgetown 

31 Carleton Home, Trustees of the . 

Gloucester 

32 Addison Gilbert Hospital, The, 298 Washington 

St. (85 beds) 

33 Annisquam Association, Inc. .... 

34 Associated Charities of Gloucester, The, Dale Ave. 

35 Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons, 

The, 1 Western Ave. ..... 

36 Gloucester District Nursing Association, 111 Main 

37 Gloucester Female Charitable Association, 88 

Middle St 

38 Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows and 

Orphans Aid Society 

39 Gloucester Fishermen's Institute, 8 Duncan St. . 

40 Gloucester Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, Inc., 

14 Prospect St.l 

41 Huntress Home, 110 Prospect St. . . \ 

42 Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia '. 

43 Young Men's Christian Association of Gloucester, 

Mass., 71 Middle St 

Goshen 

44 International Medical Missionary Society, The . 



$1,085,026 

19,338 

25,041 

1,530 

88,868 

240,516 

15,005 

14,274 

26,108 

51,013 



11,686 



154,636 
1,367 



153,778 

1,021,729 

4,156 

46,863 



928,452 

10,823 

5,066 

139,145 

19,741 

67,659 

98,492 
136,169 



93,711 
8,404 



138,592 



39,455 



$500 



12,888 

62,402 

2,068 

481 



1,328 
11,411 



8,650 
6,301 



3,961 



9,633 
18 



2,293 
481 
971 



1,583 
38 



150 
1,777 



4,000 
35 



9,446 
2,825 



$286,331 
447 



16,875 
1,722 



562 



9,625 
9,728 



2,455 



25 



20 

116,837 

4,334 



58,297 

1,021 

21 

2,031 

1,779 



5,489 



10 
1,025 



$7,69 



19 



5& 



220,228 


17,700 


12,357 


1,22 


181,566 
1,221 


4,807 


2,100 


5,43 


45 

22,617 

136,622 

12,840 


1,311 

1 

4,068 

29,287 


1,402 

2,744 

5,895 

480 


: 


457 
255,926 
552,686 
131,961 


3,403 

24,350 
1,604 


1,446 

141,713 
6,155 


12,96' 
3,93 



5,3i: 

31 



5,18< 

11,505 

43 

2,50i 



16,825 
6C 



1,626 

12,446 2,570 

3,374 471 



None. 



i No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Visits. 



5 Attendance. 



99 



iritable Corporations — Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 







Families 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



740 



$296,216 $284,060 $157,395 



12,340 



173 



7,07 = 



1,856 — 



13,809 
63,064 
2,068 
27,533 
10,366 


14,150 
66,847 
2,038 
17,415 
11,541 


5,112 
1,864 
600 
4,463 
4,302 


4 
4 
1 
9 
6 


259 

25 


2 


823 


450 


2,088 


2,099 


375 


2 


12 


8 


— 


— 


11,411 


11,513 


2,280 


14 


65 


65 


— 


— 


18,845 
18,010 


18,514 
18,111 


15,694 
4,752 


15 

7 


21,449* 
289 


— 2 
186 


— 


— 


31,285 


29,652 


15,436 


10 


— 


— 


— 


1,050 



10,854 



3,2i 



20 



2,713 

2,753 

9,964 

29,767 


3,315 

3,262 

10,772 

28,040 


491 

778 

4,185 

1,046 


1 
3 
4 
2 


10 
80,000 


— 


4,849 

13,707 

165,963 

12,173 


4,600 

12,967 

166,404 

9,113 


3,715 

71,882 
3,432 


2 

74 
7 


3,8544 

3,714 

12 


2,2494 
411 



10 



6,425 



5,578 



1,089 



59 



16 



5,317 
60 



227 
100 



5,210 


4,052 


1,370 


4 


128,341 


118,739 


45,947 


97 


14,143 


10,633 


3,480 


2 



3,380 



S6 



— 1,253 



2,524 



3,530 



788 



114,413 
1,563 
1,075 


111,821 
1,909 
1,191 


56,023 
360 
533 


95 

2 

4 


3,822 


6,083 


5,497 


2,454 


5 


9 


3,714 


3,288 


2,265 


2 


3,1394 


1,259 


1,140 


330 


3 


— 


2,939 
11,247 


3,177 
11,584 


297 
7,654 


1 
6 


100,0005 


5,637 
1,060 


4,770 
970 


2,445 
438 


5 
2 


7 

_2 


28,196 


26,596 


13,842 


18 


— 


6,670 


6,781 


1,632 


6 


142 



380 



3364 _ 



93 
106 



1,055 



100 



12 



13 



26 



39 



4^ 



P.D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private^ 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Great Barrington 
Fair\-ie\\- Hospital (50 beds) . ... 
Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barrington, 
Mass.. The 



Greenfield 
Franklin Countv Public Health Association . 
Franklin Countv Public Hospital, The (97 beds) 
(nils' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts, The 

Greenfield Girl Scouts, Inc 

Greenfield Health Camp, Inc. ._ . 
Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The2 
Home for the Aged People of Franklin County . 



Hamilton 

10 Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, 

Incorporated . . . 

1 1 Visiting Nurse Association of Hamilton and Wen- 

ham, Inc. . 



Hanover 
Hanover Visiting Nurse Association Inc. . 

Harwich 
Harwich Visiting Nurse Association Incorporated 

Haverhill 
Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, Inc. 

22 Essex St. . . . 

Family Welfare Society of Haverhill . 
General Gale Hospital Aid Association 
Haverhill Boys Club Association, 55 Emerson St, 
Haverhill Children's Aid Society, 191 Merrimack St, 
Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) 



Haverhill Day Nursery Association, 64 Pecker St 
Haverhill Female Benevolent Society . 
Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc. 1 . 
Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated 
Haverhill Union Mission, Inc., 100 Winter_ St. 
Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association 

175 Main St. . . . . 

Haverhill Young Women's Christian Association, 

107 Winter St. . . _ . 

Italian Welfare Society, 45 Columbia Park 1 
Limvood O. Towne Scholarship Association, The 

Haverhill High School .... 
Mary F. Ames Convalescents' Home, Inc., The 

26 Summer St. 1 ..... 

Massachusetts Pythian Sisters' Home Association 

The, 187 Mill St 



31 Old Ladies Home Association, 337 Main St. 
12 Sarah A. White Home for Aged Men, The, 170 
Main St 

33 Social Circle of the Portland Street Church, The 

Hingham 

34 Hingham Girl Scout Council, Inc. 

35 Hingham Troop One Committee, Incorporated 

36 Hingham Visiting Nurse Association, Inc.3 

3 7 Wilder Charitable & Educational Fund, Inc. 

HOLDEN 

38 Holden District Hospital Inc. (32 beds) 



HOLYOKE 

Community Welfare League of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, Incorporated, 328 Maple St. 1 

Holyoke Hoys' Club Association, The, 346 Race St. 

Holyoke Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 
326 Appleton St 

Holyoke Day Nursery, Incorporated, 159 Chest- 
nut St 

43 HolyoKe Family Welfare Society, Inc., 328 Maple 

44 Holyoke Girl Scout Council Incorporated, 326* 

Appleton St 



578,919 


$2,974 


$53,534 


$6,873 


32,167 


2,319 


3,240 


1,275 


4,107 
529,539 
9,834 
2,050 
9,126 


4,426 

11,427 

1,952 

3,001 


560 

101,766 

312 


61 
5,676 

208 

34 


117 


— 


— 


1 


1,038 


797 


3,421 


_ 


1,615 


2,682 


346 


- 


1,322 


796 


1,329 


■ 


116 


2,409 


3 


- 


6,250 
2,509 
1,109 
149,136 
163,323 
1,483 


5 

1,915 

458 

223 


52 

1,316 

1,508 

411 


283 

86 

32 

3,909 

6,212 

23 


59,312 
112,914 


620 
29 


1,042 


1,633 
3,209 


2,976 
12,974 


484 
603 


2,037 


62 


44,247 


2,369 


8,216 


38 


38,529 


1,114 


1,351 


1,956 



2,725 



93,182 



2,793 



184 



46,414 



05,640 


8,617 


1,172 


9,215 


5,891 


1,668 


75,000 


10,830 


765 


3 


9,977 


9 


5,712 


2,877 


2,995 



20,718 


588 


863 


14 


389,040 


413 


1,580 


13,42 


143,728 
5 


138 


213 
206 


6,4£ 


15,231 

4,064 

15,306 

158,538 


472 

141 

1,918 

21 


738 

101 

1,942 

32 


lj 
3,7) 



— Xou':. 1 No report. ^Report not due. 3 Name changed to Hingham Visiting Nurse and Community Service, Inc, 



II. 


* 
















101 


r it able 


Corporations — Continued. 














gacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief 


Siven To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




^500 


$63,882 


$64,997 


$30,734 


38 


972 


69 











1 


— 


6,834 


6,559 


4,165 


6 


1,8087 


4 


— 


— 


— 


2 


,,0085 


5,048 

119,866 

2,472 

3,035 

1 


5,198 

117,648 

2,436 

146 

3,345 


2,240 

54,223 

1,712 

1,059 


2 

96 

2 

10 


1,934 

46 
64 


46 
64 


— 


225 


1 


3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 




4,218 


3,856 


1,740 


2 


33,1486 










10 


— 


3,029 


2,553 


1,729 


1 


1,7297 


7427 


— 


— 


— 


11 


— 


2,130 


2,139 


588 


3 


2,2407 


1,4937 


— 


— 


— 


12 


— 


2,412 


2,600 


1,637 


1 


8427 


3627 


— 


— 


1 


13 


— 


336 

86 

38 

7,640 

8,179 

657 

11,295 
3,291 


1,222 

49 

37 

7,178 

8,116 

311 

3,009 
3,263 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 
3 


— 


1 
3 


14 
15 
1 < 


328 

10051 
3,000 J 

52 


4,938 
1,719 

1,101 
845 


3 
3 

2 
6 


30 

1 

86 
477 


24 
1 

477 


300 
117 


950 


Id 
17 
18 
19 

20 
21 

99 


— 


546 
2,640 


321 
2,649 


1,069 


3 


58 
729 


58 
716 


112 


— 


1 

5 


23 
24 


— - 


10,624 


9,872 


4,737 


5 


— 


— 


— 


477 


, 9 


25 


— 


4,422 


4,138 


2,051 


3 


20 


4 


— 


— 


19 


26 



258 



734 



3,021 


3,798 


1,088 


2 


5 


— 


23,223 


15,359 


6,564 


9 


23 


— 


13,259 

344 


5,447 
1,396 


1,712 


7 


9 


— 


1,210 

243 

3,997 

3,829 


776 

210 

4,411 

4,315 


30 

2,180 

981 


1 
2 
3 


1,8597 


779 


50,089 


47,966 


13,655 


22 


1,097 


142 



— 177 
2 — 



10,320 


8,432 


5,921 


17 


7,640 


6,294 


3,236 


2 


11,596 


11,640 


4,009 


14 


9,987 


9,983 


6,340 


5 


5,908 


4,776 


2,327 


1 



174 



98 119 
— 1,034 



1,054 
949 



395 



MNTot stated. 5 Restricted to capital. 6 Attendance. 7 Visits. 



io; 



P.D. i 
Abstracts of Reports of Privls 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Holyoke — Con. 

1 Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. 

2 Holyoke Home for Aged People, 1 Loomis Ave. . 

3 Holyoke Home Information Center, Inc., 330 

Maple St 

4 Holyoke Hospital, 509 Beech St. (140 beds) 

5 Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc., 

70 Essex St. . . . . . . 

6 Holyoke Society for the Care of Crippled Chil- 

dren, Inc. . . . . . . . " . 

7 Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 326 

Appleton St. ....... 

8 Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association, The, 

367 High St 

9 Ladies Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. 

10 Sisters of Providence (See below and also Adams) 

Sisters of Providence (Beaven-Kelly Home), 
Springfield Rd. ....... 

11 Sisters of Providence (Brightside Orphans' and 

Bethlehem Homes), Springfield Rd. . 

12 Sisters of Providence (Hospital) 679 Dwight St. 

(167 beds) 

13 Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home for 

Girls and Father Harkins' Home for Aged 
Women), Springfield Rd. . . . 

14 Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated, 60 Hamilton 

St. . . 

15 United Hebrew Charities of Holyoke, Inc. . 

16 Young Women's Christian Association of Hol- 

yoke, The, 315 Maple St 

HOPEDALE 

17 Hopedale Community House, Inc. 

Hudson 

18 Hudson Community Health Association, Incor- 

porated . . . 

19 Hudson Scout Association, Inc., The . 

Ipswich 

20 Coburn Charitable Society ..... 

21 Ipswich Hospital (operating Benjamin Stickney 

Cable Memorial Hospital) (33 beds) 

Lancaster 

22 Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, 

Trustees of the ....... 

23 Lancaster Social Service Association . 

Lawrence 

24 Cardinal Gibbons Clubi 

25 German Old Folks' Home of Lawrence, Massa- 

chusetts, 374 Howard St 

26 Girl Scout Council of Greater Lawrence, Incor- 

porated, 31 Jackson St. .... 

27 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence 

28 Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate, 

The, 189 Maple St. . . . . . . 

29 International Association of Y'e Men's Clubs, The 

30 International Institute of Greater Lawrence The 

19 Orchard St '. \ 

31 Lawrence Boys' Club, 155 Haverhill St. 

32 Lawrence City Mission, 31 Jackson St. 

33 Lawrence Clinic Corporation, 403 Canal St.2 

34 Lawrence Community Chest, Inc., 155 Haverhill St. 

35 Lawrence General Hospital, 63 Garden St. (122 

beds) 

36 Lawrence Home for Aged People, The, 150 Berke- 

ley St.i 

37 Lawrence Tuberculosis League, Inc., 31 Jackson St.* 

38 Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association, 40 

Lawrence St. ....... 

39 Lawrence Young Women's Christian Association,' 

38 Lawrence St. ...... 

40 Maronite Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence, 10 

Lowell St. 

41 North Essex Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

31 Jackson St. . 

— None. i No report. 2 Report for 10 months. 



$10,169 
257,332 


$857 
306 


$15,699 
5,282 


$8,59 


4,034 
821,833 


8,864 
44,246 


119,739 


4,561 


5 


2,402 


261 


- 


377 


1,600 


97 


- 


2,309 


6,139 


6,606 


4 


206,484 
703 


14,053 
212 


6,548 
9,205 


18,05 


51,293 


173 


24,656 




169,912 


1,809 


35,331 


- 


227,829 


1,699 


154,944 


- 


51,533 


881 


28,385 


- 


114,568 
612 


11,000 
258 


1,960 
793 


2,10- 


100,501 


7,025 


6,220 


80! 


652,434 


485 


2,589 


14,17; 


1,095 
18,429 


1,187 
100 


1,056 
552 


2: 


156,082 


— 


868 


7,58; 


454,381 


2,775 


26,209 


12,42J 


12,014 
25,724 


260 


655 


30.; 
1,12S 



42,201 



769 



4,559 



3,004 
940 


2,341 
533 


3,526 
398 


348,585 
2,310 


15,513 
11,814 


29,375 
2,902 


15,949 
79,980 
20,476 
11,925 
8,651 


8,375 
8,668 

10,845 
7,631 

99,610 


116 
2,057 
2,945 
6,469 


1,219,772 


11,412 


124,858 


16,386 


4,166 


279 


200,184 


10,872 


43,855 


154,324 


8,559 


8,450 


7,292 


333 


160 


7,338 


5,573 


4,413 



3 Restricted to capital. 



Report for 9 month; 



I II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



103 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$621 



$16,556 
14,801 

8,916 
168,823 

2,664 

1,697 

12,790 

38,661 
9,418 



$15,475 
12,691 

9,378 
176,377 

2,686 

1,511 

13,783 

38,569 
9,177 



$100 
5,209 

7,657 
76,957 

2,483 

1,166 

12,181 

21,970 



125 

24 



796 

3,727 



227 
16,321' 



125 



796 
87 



149 

,023< 



— 


24,829 


24,936 


5,096 


7 


96 


4 


1,835 


38,976 


38,947 


8,074 


22 


260 


12 


— 


156,643 


147,294 


52,310 


113 


5,447 


.486 


50 


29,317 


29,311 


4,619 


15 


130 


8 


— 


* 15,060 
1,051 


15,623 
1,028 


7,590 


15 


703 


— 


— 


14,054 


14,050 


9,064 


8 


— 


— 


— 


17,254 


18,554 


6,027 


6 


— 


— 


— 


2,266 
652 


2,292 
396 


1,698 


1 


2,1876 


1,021 


8083 


8,457' 


8,162 


3,419 


6 


— 5 


— 


10,0003 


41,413 


44,348 


19,034 


20 


456 


29 



— 


303 
2,045 


282 
2,351 


1,558 


145 


6,231 


6,578 


1,939 


. 


5,867 
931 


7,057 
1,097 


1,928 


6,562 


51,451 
14,738 


45,649 
13,932 


13,465 
2,829 


^65,5013) 
1 5,960 ; 


8,491 

11,504 
14,136 
14,100 
99,762 

182,022 


7,272 
11,694 
17,057 
12,785 
98,914 

172,238 


5,654 
7,016 
7,124 
3,695 
10,077 

88,194 




4,451 


5,980 


2,950 




57,136 


55,273 


27,510 


2,2693 


17,367 


17,528 


12,048 


— 


635 


655 


— 


— 


9.986 


9,758 


3,630 


' : 5 Not stated. 


6 Visits 







- 12 12 
1 1,6186 1,2096 



85 



82 



103 



1,150 



762 



1,568 
1,098 



79 



6 


21 


— 


— 


9 


312 


312 


12 


38 
6 


289 


89 


20 


7 
6 
6 

7 
11 


3,386 


3,386 


520 


18,218 


13,228 


1,505 


39 


5,269 


2,197 






2,794 



1,600 
1.22S 

1,351 



28 



195 

82 



10 

11 
12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 



2 4 



26 

27 

28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 

35 

36 
37 

38 

39 

40 
41 



104 



P.D. : 

Abstracts of Reports of Privcl 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Lawrence — Con. 

1 Patriotic Society of Habossi, Incorporated . 

2 Russell-Hood Trust, Incorporated! 

3 St. Joseph's Ladies' Aid Society, Inc., 5 Cedar St. 

4 Syrian Young Men's Association, 241 Oak St. 

5 United Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Association, 

85 Concord St.l 

6 United Syrian Society of Lawrence, Mass., 381 

Chestnut St. ....... 

Lee 

7 Ascension Farm School, The Corporation of the . 

Leicester 

8 Leicester Samaritan Association .... 

Lenox 

9 Berkshire County Home for Aged Women (Meadow 

Place Branch) (See also Pittsfield) . 

10 Lenox Visiting Nurse Association . , 

Leominster 

11 Leominster Community Chest, Inc., 19 Main St. 

12 Leominster Home for Old Ladies, The, 16 Pearl St. 

13 Leominster Hospital Association, Hospital Rd. 

(61 beds) . . . . 

14 Wachusett Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

11 Park St 

Lexington 

15 Amanda Caroline Payson Education Fund for 

Girls, Inc. ........ 

16 Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund . 

17 Lexington Home for Aged People 

18 Lexington Public Health Association Inc. . 

Lincoln 

19 Farrington Memorial, Incorporated . 

Lowell 

20 Ahepa Charitable Bureau, Inc. .... 

21 L' Association Educatrice Franco- Americaine Inc., 

121 School St 

22 Ayer Home, Trustees of the, 159 Pawtucket St. . 

23 Battles Home, The, 93 Rolfe St 

24 Channing Fraternity ...... 

25 Children's Home, 648 Central St. ... 

26 Faith Home, 249 Westford St 

27 Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell, 

36 John St 

28 Greater Lowell Council of the Boy Scouts of 

America, The, 36 John St 

29 Horn Home for Aged Couples, The, 98 Smith St. 5 

30 Humphrey O'Sullivan Fund, Inc. 

31 International Institute of Lowell, Inc., 25 Palmer 

St 

32 Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The, 63 

Howard St. ....... 

33 Ladies Helping Hand Society, The, 63 Howard St. 

34 Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc., 36 John St.l 

35 Lowell Boys Club Association, 227 Dutton St. 

36 Lowell Community Chest Association, Inc., 34 

John St 

37 Lowell Day Nursery Association, 119 Hall St. . 

38 Lowell Dispensary ...... 

39 Lowell General Hospital, The, Varnum Ave. (150 

beds) 

40 Lowell Hebrew Community Center, Inc., 105 

Princeton Boulevard ..... 

41 Lowell Humane Society, The, 97 Central St. 

42 Lowell Particular Council of the Society of St. 

Vincent de Paul, 8 Merrimack St. . 

43 Lowell Social Service League, Inc., 36 John St. 

44 Lowell Textile Associates, Inc., Moody St. . 

45 Lowell Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 36 John St. 

46 Lowell Visiting Nurse Association, 1 Dutton St. . 

47 Lowell Welfare Foundation, Thel 

48 Lowell Young Men's Christian Association, 272 

Merrimack St. . 



5,121 



$287 



3,200 
16,066 


416 

1,284 


$249 
1,933 


10,016 


570 


1,118 


112,720 


4,764 


6,818 


8,745 


265 


482 


392,309 
8,562 


1,888 


1,756 
203 


: 1,517 
160,008 


14,117 


600 


447,027 


1,601 


61,794 


5,096 


5,590 


— 


33,519 

227,078 

177,448 

9,561 


1,351 
7,129 


546 

800 



323,595 



35 

8,722 

345,185 

159,387 

11,942 

28,331 

44,125 

13,874 

17,027 
43,909 



1,163 

5,336 
5,185 

119,044 

74,883 

153,801 

6,597 

2,910,375 

87,751 
78,914 

443 
403 

23,679 
3,792 

21,227 



317,001 



18 



82 
100 



729 
101 



2,590 

6',875 

1,577 



6,564 

197 

320 

5,705 

107,981 

449 

17 

10,135 

11,105 
7,365 

296 
15,363 

155 

6,344 

13,230 



11,461 



1,120 
1,496 
3,524 

1,419 
355 

99 

8,266 
1,930 



354 

1,094 
1,227 

143 



1,422 



138,327 

345 
1,560 

117 
303 

10,028 
10 

22,731 



34,277 



— None. 



1 No report. 



2 Not stated. 



Restricted to capital. 4 Visits. 



IV Pt. II. 

Zl Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



105 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 


Service or Relief Given To 










Officers 






Families 




and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



— 


$373 


$237 


— 


— 


35 


35 


— 


784 
3,222 


323 
3,838 


$931 


3 


— 


— 


— 


1,984 


1,060 


453 


21 


— 


— 


— 


12,773 


15,047 


5,083 


6 


23 


9 


— 


929 


827 


562 


1 


8574 


2224 


$1,020 


16,833 
3,112 


16,646 
2,113 


5,458 
1,521 


9 
1 


18 
1,4994 


1,2504 


— 


14,117 
8,824 


13,585 
7,681 


202 
2,972 


1 

7 


14 


— 


— 


66,306 


58,714 


27,080 


66 


3,266 


483 


— 


5,590 


5,588 


3,964 


3 


— 


— 


94,922 
1,000 


1,103 

9,938 

100,699 

9,074 


965 
9,412 
8,943 
7,331 


300 
4,268 
4,230 


1 
5 
6 


7 
40 
9 
2,5204 


7 
40 

1,4534 



137 



997 



933 



10,484 



11,110 



4,987 



10 



273 



273 



42 



.5,823 
5253 



5,0003 



1,202 

14,834 

13,762 

318 

2,697 

1,931 

3,049 

15,149 
3,882 



6,918 



150 


1,303 
1,698 


17,9723 


7,281 


— 


108,795 

7,089 

197 


— 


169,290 


2,0003 


11,456 
9,405 


4,0003 


413 

15,667 

10,816 

6,354 

36,365 



1,252 
13,875 
5,826 
264 
2,539 
6,182 

3,080 

14,489 
5,242 



7,112 

1,239 
1,697 

7,013 

128,561 
6,790 
1,061 

183,922 

11,192 
6,815 

448 

15,642 

9,342 

6,581 

35,411 



4,339 


10 


44 


— 


1,550 


3 


15 


— 


1,188 


2 


15 


1 


1,560 


2 


11 


7 


1,501 


2 


15 


9 


5,142 


2 


— 


— 


1,175 


2 


17 


— 


— 


— 






5,532 


5 


3,214 


2 


36 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


4,891 


9 


— 


— 


4,797 


4 


— 





3,040 


5 


143 





12 


1 


— 





80,689 


151 


10,112 


348 


5,641 


3 





— 


4,546 


3 


16,4066 


2 


4,374 


4 


2 


. 2 


693 


3 


4 


— 2 


3,082 


2 


— 


— 


28,276 


24 


36,0294 


9,9514 



70 



78 



412 



1,480 



2,200 



16 



49,839 



49,256 



23,562 



2,899 



5 Name changed to The Horn Home for Aged. 6 Animals. 



106 



P.D. 1, , 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva. 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Lowell — Con. 
1 Merrimack Valley Goodwill Industries, Inc., The 
_' Ministry-at-Large in Lowell, 150 Middlesex St. . 

3 Old Ladies' Home, 520 Fletcher St. . 

4 L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain, 249 Pawtucket St. 

5 Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St. Peter's 

Orphan Asvlum), 530 Stevens St. . 

6 Saint John's Hospital, 14 Bartlett St. (166 beds) 

7 St. Toseph's Hospital, Inc., 830 Merrimack St. 

(9*13 beds) 

8 Seton Guild, The . . . . _ . 

9 Young Women's Christian Association of Lowell, 

50 John St 

Ludlow 

10 Ludlow Hospital Society (29 beds) 

, Lynn 

11 Aid Society of the Lynn Day Nursery, The, 15 

Church St. ....... 

12 Associated Charities of Lynn, The, 23 Central Ave. 

13 Bauercrest Y.M. & Y.W.H.A. Camp, Inc. . 

14 Boys' Club of Lynn, 25 North Common St. 

15 Boy Scouts of America, Bay Shore Council, Inc. 

31 Exchange St. . . . 

16 Camp Rotary, Inc., of Lynn, Mass. . . 

17 Charitable Travelers Sheltering Association, Inc. 

53 Wheeler St 

18 Columbus Guild of Lynn, 121 North Common St 

19 Community Fund Association of Greater Lynn 

90 Exchange St 

20 Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples, 159 

Washington St. ..... 

21 Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass., 11 

Church St. ...... 

22 Harris Goldman Charity Fund, Inc., The, 25 

Central Sq. ...... 

23 Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn, The . 

24 J. Fergus Gifford Shoe and Stocking Fund of the 

Lynn Rotary Club, Inc. .... 

25 Junior Aid Society, Inc. .... 

26 Lynn Association for the Blind, Inc. . 

27 Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Society . 

28 Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Helping-Hand Society, The 

29 Lynn Home for Aged Men, 34 Forest St. . 



Lynn Home for Aged Women, 37 Breed St. 
Lynn Home for Children, 15 Church St. 
Lynn Home for Young Women, 144 Broad St 
Lynn Hospital, 212 Boston St. (178 beds) . 
Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association, The 
Lynn Tuberculosis League, 56 Central Ave. 
Lynn Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 136 Broad 

St 

Mirabeau Fresh Air Camp, Inc. . 

Neighborhood House Association, 53 Neptune St, 

Pullman Mission . . 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Particular Council 

of Lynn ....... 

Union Hospital, Linwood Rd. (59 beds) 
Women's Union for Christian Work incorporated 

at Lynn ....... 

Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn, 85 

Market St. 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Lynn, M 

22 City Hall Sq 



Malden 
Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation, The, 22 Ferry St. 
Associated Charities of Maiden, The, 15 Ferry St. 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc., The, 

80 Mountain Ave. ..... 

Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc. 

The ("See also Ayer)i .... 
Maccabee Associates, Inc., The* . 
Maiden Children's Health Camp Association, Inc 

49 Wicklow St 



$53,711 
70,296 


$2,892 
483 


$33,337 


523,934 
173,631 


78 
14,414 


1,500 
22,410 


88,438 
777,837 


2,157 
1,047 


11,002 
171,130 


270,774 
870 


746 
1,404 


117,578 
9,454 


198,433 


6,528 


21,775 



33,489 



31,182 



12,879 



1,155 



311 



1,106 



23.189 



42,001 

90,720 

20,490 

147,122 


7,016 

14,025 

275 

10,620 


3,362 

13,047 
1,294 


27,787 
23,802 


10,449 
1,250 


7,943 
234 


6,852 
20,614 


1,440 
902 


5,213 


29,834 


135,405 


— 


83,812 


1,566 


500 


464 


150 


658 


15,349 


760 


— 


5,034 

8,533 

10,202 

3,794 


644 
935 

383 
279 


86 
3,632 

2,265 
200 


324,341 


400 ' 


250 


498,437 

68,890 

135,781 

,441,093 

2,581 


3,842 
456 

642 
5,890 


887 

3,683 

8,821 

225,626 

118 


11,381 

2,206 

21,864 

18,251 


4,000 
719 

3,579 
860 


5,793 

546 
1,621 


2,798 
181,967 


8,411 
903 


54,073 


473,612 


23,500 


47,711 


54,771 


4,667 


5,042 


38,272 
68,662 


1,000 
693 


— 



8,467 



687 



132 



None. 



i No report. 



2 Not stated. 



Restricted to capital. 



4 Visits. 



1 II. 


















107 


haritable Corporations — Continued. 






















Paid 


Service or Relief Given To 


















Current 


Current 


Salaries 


Officers 






Families 








Legacies 


Receipts 


Expendi- 


and 


and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Organi- 








tures 


Wages 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


ship 


zations 






$36,230 


$36,254 


$7,899 


5 


111 


— 2 








1 


{$5,0003) 
I 9,845 J 


2,912 


2,669 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


2 


28,414 


14,703 


6,060 


10 


34 














3 


— 


37,328 


29,052 


8,111 


40 


292 


19 


— 


— 


— 


4 





13,160 


13,561 


1,560 


1 


102 


12 











5 


521 


176,840 


159,606 


80,697 


165 


9,529 


5,972 


— 


— 


— 


6 





122,035 


115,396 


28,475 


85 


10,235 


775 


__ 








7 


— 


10,861 


10,397 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


8 


(5,0003) 
1 273 J 






















32,276 


31,279 


16,322 


21 


— 


— 


— 


588 


— 


9 


— 


24,836 


26,696 


12,181 


17 


637 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 




11,904 


13,176 


5,316 


5 


79 


39 








11 


— 


17,198 


17,325 


4,960 


3 


— 


— ■ 


1,302 


— 


— 


12 


— 


13,365 


13,350 


4,262 


34 


125 


20 


— 


— 


— 


13 


— 


12,552 


13,443 


7,769 


15 


— 


— 


— 


1,709 


4 


14 





18,399 


18,111 


8,150 


4 











2,251 





15 


— 


1,484 


1,855 


— 


— 


39 


39 


— 


— 


— 


16 


_ 


1,451 


1,279 








1,080 


1,080 











17 


— 


. 6,351 


6,691 


1,390 


3 


578 


567 


111 


— 


2 


18 


— 


135,931 


139,315 


4,770 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


22 


19 


— 


5,950 


5,237 


2,505 


4 


8 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


— 


815 


834 


— 


— 


14 


14 


90 


— 


1 


21 




575 


310 


. 


. . 


. 


. 








7 


22 


— 


760 


760 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


23 


_ 


730 


631 




. 











— 


2 


24 


— 


4,703 


4,372 


— 


— 


993 


993 


— 


— 


1 


25 


— 


275 


258 


— 


■ — 


41 


41 


30 


— 


— 


26 


— 


2,688 


1,827 


— 


— 


60 


60 


— 


— 


— 


27 


— 


479 


479 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


28 


If 2,9373) 
,133,992 j 






















47,734 


9,941 


2,363 


4 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29 


(3,46231 
19,949 j 


41,823 


30,724 


8,063 


10 


23 


. 











30 





7,760 


7,849 


1,674 


2 


47 


10 


— 


— 


— 


31 


6003 


13,450 


13,885 


4,764 


8 


30 


— 


— 


— 


— 


32 


43,5073 


279,332 


272,656 


138,097 


208 


46,400 


12,668 


— 


— 


— 


33 





761 


761 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- — 


1 


34 


— 


5,890 


5,395 


2,146 


2 


11 


11 


— 


— 


— 


35 




10,101 


10,678 


8,657 


7 


9,6814 


1,7104 


— 


— 


— 


36 





719 


693 


100 


1 


180 


180 


— 


— 


2 


37 


100 


4,915 


5,737 


2,135 


9 


— ■ 


— 


15 


343 


, — 


38 


— 


2,617 


2,845 


— 


— 


19 


19 


29 


""" 


14 


39 


_ 


8,411 


8,009 





— 


— 


— 


377 


— 


— 


40 


25,000 


83,986 


60,363 


25,701 


41 


1,031 


21 


— 


~~~ 




41 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


42 


5003 


71,762 


70,785 


37,227 


42 


— 


— 


— 


3,950 


— 


43 


— 


9,709 


9,665 


4,132 


10 


— 


— 


— 


465 


2 


44 




3,244 


2,285 




















22 


45 


— 


3,295 


3,191 


2,380 


2 


— 


— 


294 


— 


— 


46 


— 


8,778 


8,195 


1,856 


3 


526 


500 






6 


47 

48 
49 


— 


1,950 


2,656 


863 


6 


72 


72 


— 


— 


— 


50 



108 



P.D. 1 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest 
Dividend 

Annuitic 
and Rent; 



Malden — Con. 

1 Maiden Council of Girl Scouts, Inc., 142 Pleasant 

St. . . . . . ... 

2 Maiden Frauen Verein Sheltering Society, Inc. 1 

3 Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association, The 

4 Maiden High School Scholarship, Inc. 

5 Maiden Home for Aged Persons, The, 578 Main St. 

6 Maiden Hospital, The, Hospital Rd., (207 beds) 

7 Maiden Industrial Aid Society, The, 21 Ferry St. 

8 Maiden Tuberculosis and Health Association, Inc., 

21 Ferry St 

9 Maiden Young Men's Christian Association, The, 

83 Pleasant St 

10 Monday Club of Maiden, The2 . . ... 

11 Quannapowitt Council, Boy Scouts of America, 

The, 6 Pleasant St. . ..... 

12 Young Women's Christian Association of Maiden, 

54 Washington St. ..... 

Mansfield 

13 Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association . 

Marblehead 

14 Marblehead Female Humane Society . 

15 Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association 

16 Young Men's Christian Association of Marblehead, 

The 

Marlborough 

17 Algonquin Council, Boy Scouts of America, 

Incorporated ...... 

18 Hillside School, Robin Hill Rd. . 

19 Marlborough Hospital, Union St. (65 beds) 

20 Marlborough Woman's Club 

21 Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society . 



24 



27 



Marshfield 

22 Nathaniel Taylor Fund Inc 

Maynard 

23 Russian Educational Society of Maynard, Inc., The 

Medford 
Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford, 170 

Governors Ave. (75 beds) .... 

Medford Council Girl Scouts, Inc., 26 High St. . 
Medford Home for Aged Men and Women, 203 

High St 

Medford Unemployment and Relief Association, 

Inc., 60 Salem St.i 

Medford Visiting Nurse Association, 107 Salem St. 
Mystic Valley Chapter No. 55, Disabled American 

Veterans of the World War, Inc., 1 Summit Rd.* 

Melrose 
Fitch Home, Inc., The, 75 Lake Ave. . 
Melrose Hospital Association, 585 Lebanon St., 

(102 beds) 

Melrose Young Men's Christian Association, 

The, 497 Main St 

Morgan and Dodge Home for Aged Women, The, 

265 Franklin St.l 



$5,390 


$2,249 


$2,643 


$112 


8,272 

10,916 

358,403 

1,003,697 

186,587 


582 

357 
4,144 
1,831 


15,947 

4,301 

269,140 

1,486 


311 

11,725 

7,713 

3,761 


5,402 


1,810 


— 


— 


270,853 
9,004 


1,793 

192 


27,839 
53 


2,256 
275 


35,082 


7,360 


7,283 


— 


33,838 


1,415 


1,995 


144 



3,005 



76,295 
29,605 



74,624 



7,193 
14,047 

754,436 
2,136 

201,099 
38,013 



Mendon 

34 Resthaven Association, Inc., The 

Methuen 

35 Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Temporary 

Home, The ....... 

36 Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and Incurable 

MlDDLEBOROUGH 

37 Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc 

38 Hannah B. Griffith Shaw Home for the Aged, 

Incorporated, The ...... 

39 Middleboro Good Will Club Incorporated . '. 

40 Middleborough Relief Association Inc. 3 

41 Montgomery Home for Aged People . . "" . 



None, i No report. 2 Report for 7 months. 



669 



934 
533 



2,428 



1,940 



99 

842 



5,533 



225 



24 



147 



365 



3,567 
1,055 

653 



55,885 


5,003 


3,334 


856 


85,677 


19,765 


32,060 


33 


249,750 


222 


55,980 


2,913 


2,407 


1,278 


630 


60 


8,164 


296 


481 


204 



179 



2,393 
976 


122,285 
5,889 


14,573 


525 


1,991 


5,557 


2,237 


6,757 


1,187 











468,901 


840 


4,818 


11,623 


582,299 


2,643 


132,358 


9,648 


101,770 


7,176 


8,703 


344 


693 


221 


25 


5 


7,866 

510,327 


875 
3,206 


3,021 
9-,771 


222 
10,584 


5,513 


4 


59 


— 


15,000 
253 


156 





— 


114,519 


61 


4,066 


4,344 


changed to Middleboro Good Will Club Inc. 



1 1 II. 

charitable Corporations 



109 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 





Service or Relief Given To 


Paid 










Officers 






Families 




and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$5,000 
4,1645 



$5,005 

16,529 

311 

21,384 

280,497 

7,079 

1,814 

31,889 

520 

14,646 
3,555 



$4,831 

16,559 

300 

18,524 

280,206 

7,486 

1,368 

31,950 
481 

14,065 

3,938 



$1,364 

110 

6,211 

122,631 

4,187 

300 

14,975 

3,705 
1,463 



135 



27 

5,577 

40 



12 



280 

27 
3 

40 



1,588 



— 1,551 
30 745 



2,675 



2,578 



2,179 



3,240* 



378* 



4,601 
2,430 



8,614 



4,814 
2,330 

7,646 



1,794 
1,777 



4,141 



5 
2,151< 



4586 



— 6,169 



39,1365 
12,6785 



9,194 
52,241 
59,116 

1,969 
982 



552 



48,164 

48,686 

2,196 

893 



636 



4,125 

9,263 

19,810 

1,040 

32 



80 
2,543 
1,093< 



171 
4456 



— 1,319 

10 — 

17 



389 



361 



120 



— 


139,252 
6,866 


127,922 
7,154 


59,084 
1,962 


55 
24 


2,841 


90 


8,164 


8,894 


2,395 


4 


14 


— 


10,195 


11,321 


8,239 


5 


9,267< 


32,2345) 
612 j 


17,894 


13,446 


4,279 


7 


32 


23,7835 


144,650 


141,765 


67,486 


116 


4,476 


450 


16,674 


16,230 


8,502 


13 


— 



351 



3966 



930 



500 



620 



253 



355 



55 



23 



23 



24,000 



4,119 
47,562 



4,147 
39,486 



1,801 
14,984 



64 



59 



15,000 
500 



15,000 
156 

8,971 



5,464 



2,360 



20 



4 Report not due. 



5 Restricted to capital. 



6 Visits. 



110 



p.d. 1: 

Abstracts of Reports of Privai 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest. 
Dividend 

Annuities i r 
and Renta 



MlDDLEBOROUGH Cott. 

1 St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborougr- (31 beds) $236,850 $329 $27,013 

2 Young Men's Christian Association of Middle- 

borough, The* 

3 Y. M. H. A. Camp Avoda Association, Inc. . 19,630 — 13,969 

MlLFORD 

4 Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of 

Mercy (See also Springfield) .... 733 2,118 211 

5 Home for the Aged at Milford, The . . # . 17,043 — — 

6 Milford-Hopedale-Mendon Instructive District 

Nursing Association 40,171 4,253 6,469 

7 Milford Hospital (60 beds) 807,654 500 86,907 

8 Young Men's Christian Association of Milford 1 . 

Millbury 

9 Millbury Society for District Nursing, The . 632 , 1,463 1,318 

Milton 

10 Cunningham Foundation 313,271 37,147 3,341 

11 Fuller Trust, Inc., The 1,647,813 — 1,200 

12 Henry B. Martin Home 17,100 768 161 

13 Milton Hospital and Convalescent Home (27 beds) 288,540 7,163 23,748 

14 Milton Visiting Nurse and Social Service League 3,798 6,721 4,250 

15 Swift Charity 69,061 — — 

MONSON 

16 Dornoe E. Parker and Fannie M. Parker Memorial 

Hospital (not in operation) .... — — — 

17 Monson Home for Aged People, Inc. . . . 172,756 82 

Montague 

18 Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, 

Massachusetts, The (74 beds) .... 257,635 2,718 54,516 

Monterey 

19 William J. Gould Associates, Inc., The . . 78,852 7,710 14,270 

Nantucket 

20 Children's Aid Society of Nantucket . . . 4,074 18 — 

21 Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc. .... 27,966 — — 

22 Nantucket Cottage Hospital (23 beds) . . . 225,432 15,824 26,980 

23 Old People's Home Association of Nantucket, The 84,448 374 686 

24 Relief Association > 46,652 639 — 

25 Union Benevolent Society, The .... 6,596 — — 

Natick 

26 Leonard Morse Hospital (60 beds) . . . 411,170 5,510 64,508 

27 Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons . . 148,324 — 25 

28 Natick Visiting Nurse Association, The . . 4,090 1,380 2,038 

29 New England Deaconess Association (J. W. Wilbur 

Health Home) 12,000 3,313 2,397 

Needham 

30 King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. . . . 3,037 55 154 

31 Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc. . . 3,869 1,813 1,524 

New Bedford 

32 Animal Rescue League of New Bedford, 38 Hill- 

man St 178,188 3,650 

33 Association for the Relief of Aged Women . . 663,049 43 100 

34 Cachalot Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

105 William St 2,285 6,541 46 

35 Catholic Welfare Bureau of New Bedford, Inc., 

628 Pleasant St 1,049 10,475 307 

36 Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the 

North End of New Bedford, Mass., Inc., 6 

Waldo St . 3,185 437 117 

37 College Club of New Bedford, Inc., The . . 6,840 741 2,353 

38 Hachnosath Orchim Charitable Association, 271 

County St.i ....... 

39 Hebrew Free Loan Society of New Bedford, Inc., 

57 Howland St. 3,286 684 3 374 

40 Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society, New Bed- 

ford, Mass. . . .... 2,586 1,519 1 159 

41 Henryk Dabrowski Society, 146 Ashley Blvd. . 14,382 ' 

— None. i No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Animals. 4 Restricted to capital. 5 Visits. 



$9,332 



6 

418 



15,073 

74 

64,986 

12,031 

2,770 

5,526 
186 



137 

947 

5,821 

1,240 

1,174 

116 



25,084 

5,635 

83 

32 



5,260 
26,920 



68 



1,967 



:. II. 


















11 


1 


haritable 


Corporations- — Continued. 














Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 

Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


ERVICE 01 


Relief Given To 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




— 


$36,675 


$39,691 


$15,921 


17 


752 


7 


— — — 


1 


— 


13,969 


9,845 


2,838 


23 


1,106 


— 


— — — 


2 
3 


— 


2,336 
418 


2,318 


— 


— 


1,010 


1,010 


24—3 


4 

5 


527,7544 


10,722 
102,480 


11,447 
94,849 


8,730 
38,388 


6 

67 


10,4325 
2,860 


4,1195 


— 


— 


4 


6 

7 



'500 



20,0054 



2,857 



2,840 



1,503 



!,3945 



822; 



40,489 


39,918 


21,692 


8 


60 


10 


66,186 


36,391 


17,134 


10 


14 


11 


929 


929 


438 


2 


6 


3 


45,444 


38,450 


19,712 


18 


1,305 


24 


10,996 


10,046 


7,688 


8 


9,1705 


3,6945 


2,770 


2,774 


— 


— 


14 


14 



5,608 



4,668 



2,262 



— 


57,234 


57,130 


22,804 


56 


2,034 


18 


— 


— 


21,167 


21,732 


5,749 


9 


430 


128 


— 


6,287 


156 

948 

48,653 

8,589 

1,813 

116 


646 
932 

40,511 

5,283 

2,437 

254 


586 

20,596 

1,814 

50 

45 


4 

22 
4 
1 
3 


1 

39 

638 

5 

17 


1 
39 

2 

17 


6 


— 


95,103 
6,888 
3,502 


98,309 
7,084 
2,831 


46,774 
3,717 
2,300 


57 
4 
4 


1,795 
14 
2,3155 


50 
3205 


E 


— 


5,965 


7,703 


2,699 


5 


70 


33 


— 


2,000 
2,000 


2,240 
5,344 


248 
2,656 


2,028 


1 


5 
2,4755 


5 
7605 


1 


3,209 
5,2454) 
.3,420 j 


12,120 
30,484 


11,319 
32,592 


6,685 


6 


7,2593 
53 


— .2 

48 


— 


— 


6,587 


7,051 


4,011 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10,782 


10,766 


3,484 


3 


— 


— 


603 


— 


555 
3,164 


280 
3,128 


— 


- 


1 


1 


36 



4,058 



2,678 
1,967 



3,827 

3,379 
1,112 



116 



78 



2 — 



1,287 



200 



112 



P.D. 1 
Abstracts of Reports of Priva 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interes 
Dividenc 

Annuiti 
and Rent 



New Bedford — Con. 

Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of the 

James Arnold Fund, Trustees of the . 

Ladies City Mission Society in New Bedford, 
755 South First St 

New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association (Oper- 
ating Sassaquin Sanatorium), 4431 Acushnet 
Ave. (116 beds) 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society, 60 Eighth St. 

New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. . 

New Bedford Day Nursery, 1060 Cove Rd. 

New Bedford Dorcas Society .... 

New Bedford Family Welfare Society, 60 Eighth 
St.i 

New Bedford Girl Scouts Inc., 12 Market St. 

New Bedford Home for Aged, 396 West Middle St. 

New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association, 
The, 60 Eighth St 

New Bedford Men's Mission, Inc., 151 North 
Second St. ....... 

New Bedford Port Society, 15 Johnny Cake Hill 

New Bedford Port Society, Ladies Branch . 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Association, 
The, 147 William St. . . _ . 

New Bedford Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion, 66 Spring St. ..... . 

North End Guild of New Bedford, Tallman St. . 

Sacred Heart Home, 359 Summer St. 

Saint Luke's Hospital of New Bedford, 95 Page 
St. (374 beds) 

Saint Mary's Home of New Bedford, 593 Kemp- 
ton St 



22 Union for Good Works, 12 Market St. 

23 Welfare Federation of New Bedford, 60 Eighth St. 

24 Winfred Goff Homoeopathic Hospital, The (not 

in operation) ....... 

Newburyport 

25 Anna Jaques Hospital, Highland Ave. (52 beds) 

26 Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, Inc., 

The, 2 Harris St. 

27 General Charitable Society of Newburyport 

28 Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newburyport 

Fire Department, The, Central Fire Station 

29 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, The 

30 Merrimack Humane Society, The 

31 Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport, 

The, 2 Harris St 

32 Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 2 

Harris St. ....... 

33 Newburyport Bethel Society .... 

34 Newburyport Female Charitable Society, The 

35 Newburyport Homeopathic Hospital, The, 277 

High St. (29 beds) 3 

36 Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Men, 

361 High St 

37 Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Women, 

75 High St . 

38 Newburyport Young Men's Christian Association, 

98 State St 

39 Young Women's Christian Association of New- 

buryport, 13 Market St 

New Marlborough 

40 Smith Park Young Men's Christian Association . 

Newton 

41 All Newton Music School, Incorporated 

42 All Souls Lend A Hand Club, Inc. 

43 Baptist Home of Massachusetts, The, 66 Common- 

wealth Ave. ....... 

44 Boys Welfare League Inc. ...'.'. 

45 Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc 

46 Children's Singing Guild, of Newton, Thel . 

47 Family Service Bureau of Newton, Incorporated, 

12 Austin St., Newtonville .... 

48 Lamson Home, The . . 



$58,500 
106,943 

119,622 



40,200 



$4,817 



772 



$582 



502,273 
279,852 

24,905 
130,679 

26,435 


2,219 

8,208 

110 

770 

148 


99,380 

4,951 

329 

66a 


5,720 
101,459 


2,882 
21 


4,719 
196 


57,021 


6,069 


11,514 


22,344 

128,674 

52,381 


1,437 
172 

27 


3,973 

40 

22 


250,449 


8,900 


18,040 


450,054 

23,385 

300,655 


13,687 
587 


43,872 

34 

38,456 


4,026,738 


28,553 


335,606 


320,168 


6,713 


5,649 


205,516 
4,816 


3,070 
10,952 


205 


6,696 


— 


— 


1,175,076 


1,706 


52,996 


5,119 
3,663 


3,740 
50 


80 


7,989 

232 

17,308 


275 


175 
259 


18,113 


— 


1,013 


47,055 
3,573 
3,837 


1,247 
13 

5 


— 


62,641 


430 


12,574 


181,584 


— 


528 


316,086 


162 


282 


103,500 


2,803 


4,717 


115,689 


347 


6,300 



6,366 



None. 



1 No report. 



1,050 
22,164 


5,512 
1,898 


4,174 
449 


865 


1,052,091 
1,200 
7,268 


4,939 


15,238 


.32,759 
368 


30,411 
9,694 


44,319 


922 


1,042 
280 



2 Not stated. 3 Name changed to Worcester Memorial Hospital. 



I'll. 

'haritable Corporations 



113 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 







Families 




Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$2,374 
4,164 

11,937 



$2,705 
4,531 

8,526 



$4,841 



3,467 



63 



93,630 



135 



96,710 



41,607 



66 



2,079 



223 



1,548 


3,895 
8,901 


3,570 
5,493 


1,691 

200 


1 

1 


— 


363 
534 
478 


147 
418 

500 


70 


4 


— 


5,228 


4,525 


1,574 


2 


— 


3,504 
128 
101 


3,459 
236 
141 


— 


— 


5,723 


20,726 


21,500 


8,522 


13 


3,1534 


9,258 


7,615 


3,231 


8 


2,1794 


13,394 


12,832 


6,054 


7 


— 


10,577 


10,205 


6,082 


16 


— 


12,825 


14,069 


5,629 


10 


— 


7,139 


8,924 


2,569 


33 


' — 


9,686 
3,212 


9,506 
2,637 


8,940 


18 


1,5724 


52,938 


45,593 


10,042 


15 


— 


368 


450 


— 


— 


1804 


46,283 
280 


45,439 
280 


14,353 


9 



165 
214 

53 

1 



26 



30 



— 


114,685 

23,792 

1,236 

6,006 

830 


107,757 

23,318 

2,043 

6,795 

841 


45,682 
10,535 

3,319 


64 
6 

10 


205 

152 

9 

94 

145 


2 
85 

9 
61 


45 


. — 


1004 

552 


7,756 
2,671 


7,295 
2,222 


2,877 
684 


2 
3 


6 





— 


710 


— 


19,789 


20,696 


18,255 


13 


20,7015 


7,1395 


— 


— 


— 


5,419 
4,160 
2,248 


5,422 
5,331 
2,150 


2,344 

1,639 

153 


4 
2 
1 


2 

209 


2 

179 


12 
13 


— 


2,356 


31,530 


31,078 


16,832 


17 


— 


— 


— 


970 


2,500 


59,803 

1,507 

42,356 


65,218 

1,490 

31,767 


27,759 
1,081 
5,787 


35 

3 

35 


165 


14 


— 


1,819 
566 


7,0004 


456,039 


479,367 


243,713 


274 


12,362 


537 


— 


— 


625 
2,0004) 
1,745 j 


16,057 

11,116 
11,157 


16,638 

9,906 
10,434 


4,165 
3,876 


3 
2 


149 
379 


90 
379 


62 


— 



130 
40 



86 
3 


86 

3 


17 
4 


367 


— 


— 


11 


— 


— 


54 


35 


24 



20 



248 



300 
481 



^Restricted to capital. 5 Visits. 



114 



P.D. 1 

Abstracts of Reports of Privai 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 
Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



10 



15 



22 



Newton — Con. 
Lasell Alumnae, Inc. ...... 

Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the American 

Revolution, 2349 Washington St., Newton Lower 

Falls 

Mayor's Relief Committee Inc., 93 Union St., 

Newton Centre ....... 

Mothers' Rest Association of the City of Newton, 

Incorporated, The, 26 Oak Hill St., Newton 

Centre ........ 

New England Peabody Home for Crippled Children, 

The, 474 Brookline St., Newton Centre . 
Newton Centre Woman's Club, Inc., The, 1280 

Centre St., Newton Centre .... 
Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 
Newton Community Chest, Incorporated, 93 Union 

St., Newton Centre ...... 

Newton District Nursing Association, 297 Walnut 

St., Newtonville2 

Newton Hospital, 2014 Washington St., Newton 

Lower Falls (268 beds) . _ . 
Newton Hospital Aid Association, The 
Newton Local Council, Girl Scouts, Inc., 297 

Walnut St 

Newton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 

276 Church St 

Norumbega Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

259 Walnut St., Newtonville .... 
Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan Girls, 

Corporation of the, 24 Hovey St. 
Stearns School Centre^ ..... 

Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged People, 

277 Elliot St., Newton Upper Falls . 
Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston, The, 

206 Waltham St., West Newton 
Walker Missionary Homes, Inc., 144 Hancock St., 

Auburndale ....... 

West Newton Community Centre, Incorporated, 

492 Waltham St., West Newton 
Working Boy's Home, 601 Winchester St., Newton 

Highlands ........ 



$7,704 



$632 



$223 



North Adams 
Hospital, The, Hospital Ave. 



(91 



North Adamj 

beds) 4 

Venerini Sisters, Inc., 74 Marshall St. 
Young Men's Christian Association of North Adams, 

Mass., The, 34 Summer St 



10,325 


1,068 


471 


342 


2,569 


3 


32,607 


2,431 


855 


1,102,819 


3,357 


3,346 


68,465 
3,027 


3,702 
2,084 


5,847 
3,020 


102,946 


189,605 


— 


11,185 


2,907 


1,516 


2,700,969 
2,175 


235,126 
1,556 


338,032 
2,155 


29,290 


6,168 


4,081 


275,962 


14,885 


44,843 


46,158 


10,512 


— 


80,880 
3,137 


657 
4,095 


399 


649,598 


3,554 


6,824 


165,101 


722 


8,495 


224,603 


4,725 


14,250 


7,947 


4,277 


160 


208,352 


49,829 


31,347 


473,337 
32,341 


17,890 
1,335 


82,243 
8,920 



129,055 



8,166 



9,130 



25 



30 



32 



35 



Northampton 
Children's Aid Association of Hampshire County, 

16 Center St 

Clarke School for the Deaf, The, 46 Round Hill 
Cooley Dickinson Hospital, The, 30 Locust St 

(146 beds) 

Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Benevolent 

Society of Florence, 47 Pine St. 
Hampshire County Public Health Association, Inc 

240 Main St 

Hampshire-Franklin Council, Incorporated, Boy 

Scouts of America, 38 Gothic St.i . 
Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in 

Northampton, 215 South St. . 
Northampton Visiting Nursing Association, Inc 

240 Main St 

Smith Students' Aid Society, Incorporated . 
Wright Home for Young Women, The, 96 Bridge 

Young Men's Christian Association of North 
ampton, Massachusetts, The, 29 King St. 



North Andover 
36 Charlotte Home, The . 



North Attleborough 

37 North Attleborough District Nursing Associ; 

Northeridge 

38 George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc. 



39,303 
2,630,516 

760,387 

232 

8,391 

382,735 



5,165 
99 



13,337 



6,407 



3,331 
136,217 

149,926 



442 



9,187 



5,279 
156,396 


3,231 
2,396 


2,457 
9,959 


290,297 


— 


— 


70,000 


5,871 


9,481 


84,367 


— 


— 


8,335 


2,401 


849 


235,505 


. 






- None. 



1 No report. 2 Report for 3 months. 3 Name changed to Rebecca Pomroy House. N 



I IL 

haritable Corporations ■ — Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



115 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 





Families 




Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$1,058 



$455 



$75 



1,776 1,615 — 

2,575 3,024 1,041 2 



1806 



3,467 


. 5,549 


1,450 


8 


260 


260 


78,881 


109,404 


40,581 


50 


95 


47 


9,620 
5,105 


9,479 
4,461 


2,141 
1,231 


1 
11 


10 


10 


192,552 


196,010 


10,610 


8 


— 


— 


4,534 


4,894 


3,600 


9 


5,7967 


1,224' 


431,192 

3,772 


431,192 
5,447 


238,757 
682 


277 
1 


10,931 


4,041 


10,343 


9,782 


4,209 


4 


— 


— 


64,137 


64,058 


21,511 


15 


— 


— 


10,512 


10,428 


6,482 


4 


— 


— 


6,912 
4,187 


5,480 
4,216 


2,389 
2,767 


2 
5 


7 
365 


3 


30,842 


23,989 


10,605 


15 


25 


— 


14,403 


9,444 


2,390 


4 


45 


18 


30,662 


23,797 


6,727 


8 


485 


— 


4,589 


4,576 


3,456 


6 


— 


— 


81,674 


79,317 


4,320 


10 


138 


70 


115,269 
10,352 


128,215 
7,289 


69,800 


75 


2,593 
80 


613 

55 



37 



15 



1,492 
3,024 
1,558 



562 



12 



17,297 



16,542 



8,146 



2,612 



42 



,2.000' 



9,172 
201,766 


11,779 
193,475 


5,262 
114,508 


4 
93 


249 

160 


196 

2 


141 


168,161 


165,170 


67,627 


122 


4,663 


17 


— 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6,955 


6,189 


2,238 


2 


460 


460 


150 



19 



18,209 

5,761 
16,959 

11,789 

15,760 

3,032 

3,525 



18,893 

5,714 
14,353 

9,198 

13,493 

1,448 

3,569 

5,160 



8,755 
4,975 

4,173 
7,178 



2,905 



39 

8,0987 
79 

10 



2,966 



2,978' 

7 

10 



1,309 



451 



Report for 15 months. 5 Not stated. 6 Restricted to capital. 7 Visits. 



17 



25 
26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 
33 

34 

35 

36 
37 

38 



no 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



M(D Aim>ri-ss 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



\ ki BBSXDGB - Con. 

Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The (IS beds) . 

N OK I 11 FIELD 

field Seminary Students Aid Society . 

NORTOM _ „. 

mvUle Communis Service Corporation, Ihe 

Home for Old Ladies of Norton, Massa- 

•-. The 

NfORWBLL 
rell Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 
Norwood . 

Lewis and Anna M. Day Home for Aged in Nor- 
. Inc. •••.•••'* 

rood Civic Association 

d Hospital (80 beds) . 

Oak Bluffs 
Marthas Vineyard Hospital, Inc. (29 beds) 



Inc., The 



9 

Orange 
►range Visiting Nurse Association, 

Oxford 

1 1 Oxford Home for Aged People . 

Palmer , 

12 Wing Memorial Hospital Association (2/ beds) . 

Peabody . 

13 Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Peabody, 

li>9 Lowell St. . • • _ • , • 

14 Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers . 
Hebrew Ladies Gemilath Chessad of Peabody, 

Massachusetts . . ■ ■ T • , «..,, " 
I ] saac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy Children 
Ladies Auxiliary of the Congregation Anshe Sfard 
of Peabody, Massachusetts, 5 Littles Lanei . 

18 Lanis Hatze'dek of Peabody, Incorporated . . 

19 Peabody Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, 23 Main 

Peabody 'Visiting Nurse Association . • . • 

R tary Club Education Fund of Peabody, 33 Mam 

Sutton Home for 'Aged Women in Peabody, 7 

.11 StA 

Pembroke 
Pembroke [ewish Youth Camps, Inc.* . . 

Pembroke Public Health Nursing Association Inc. 

Pepperell 
P perell District Nurse Association, Inc. . 

Petersham 
Petersham Exchange, The 

PlTTSFIELD 

iated Charities of Pittsfield, The, 33 Pearl St. 
Benevolent Association for the Llind, 

Ea « le St ' „, • . • t, • , i 

hire I '.ranch of the Woman s Board of 

in Boston . • •,-:," „,; 

Count) Home for Aged Women, 89 

Lenox) . . ., • 

31 Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crippled 

Children, The, 472 West St. . 

I nty Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 



33 | of Pittsneld, 16 Melville St. . . 

,i, of Pittsfield, Mas-., Robbins Ave. 

35 HillerCSf Hospital, 798 North St. (42 beds) 



38 



■ ■:■ 741 North St. (200 beds) 

i Pittsfield, Inc., 44 West St. 
Health Camp of Pittsfield, Inc., East 
i Rd. 



$98,775 

32,714 

2,572 
316,375 

581 



113,139 

204,453 
520,462 



210,757 

184 

84,458 

54,564 



51,267 
30,963 

114 

37,772 



475 

163 
2,880 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities 
and Rentals 



$1,944 $13,324 

775 2,643 

14 2,324 

453 958 

9,607 138,365 

5,121 30,119 

1,932 780 



828 



180 
125 



103 



286 
330 



26,557 



227 
481 



272 



169 

380 
2,192 



$3,022 

1,684 

1 
9,901 



1,150 


1,080 


209 


537 


347 


1,014 


3,908 


181 


1,487 


31,617 


20,615 


1,997 


2,167 


593 


250 


7,796 


4,598 


— 


535,109 


1,539 


2,687 


250,761 


5,748 


2,397 


185 

712,451 

17,942 


7,571 

12,525 

39 


270 
7,478 


478,981 


1,550 


56,653 


874,002 
4,381 


6,355 
836 


252,752 
1,465 


7,185 


1,839 


— 



i No report. * Not stated. 3R es tricted to capital. 4 Visits. 



k ii. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



117 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given To 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi 
zations 




- 


$18,470 


$19,550 


$9,063 


16 


711 









1 


;il,4953 


5,103 


7,405 


— 


— 


45 


— 


— — 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 




3 




12,240 


10,733 


4,312 


5 


8 


— 


' — — 


— 


4 


3 


1,488 


1,342 


390 


1 


6094 


1494 


— — 





5 


— 


5,141 
103 


514 

50 


500 


1 


— 


— 







6 




151,953 


148,833 


67,171 


85 


4,655 


143 


— — 


' 


7 
8 


f 3,8483 


38,133 


34,743 


15,036 


18 


464 


1 


— — 


— 


9 


— 


2,713 


2,997 


2,020 


2 


2,1644 


6934 


— — 





10 


— 


3,890 


2,035 


100 


1 


— 


— 


1 — 


— 


11 


— 


27,480 


31,435 


14,722 


13 


902 


22 


— . — 


— 


12 





2,208 


2,120 


625 


3 


4 
10 










~~ 


1,065 


1,077 


50 


1 


10 


9 




13 
14 





398 
1,866 


1,337 
315 


75 


1 


27 


18 


— __ 





15 


















— 


16 


— 


273 


72 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 — 




17 
18 




666 
2,522 


569 
2,382 


2,033 


1 


2,7324 


1714 


60 — 


— 


19 

20 

21 
22 


— 


1,289 


480 


— 2 


1 


1,1384 


9564 


— — 


— 


23 
24 


— 


1,361 


1,368 


936 


2 


2,2004 


4004 


— — 


— 


25 


— 


1,668 


1,256 


382 


3 


— 


— 


~ — 




26 


— 


22,663 


22,663 


9,552 


7 


— 


— 


652 — 




27 


— 


914 


784 


— 


— 


40 


40 


— 




28 


5,0003 


4,656 


4,845 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— — 


1 


29 


5,990 


60,090 


19,913 


6,808 


9 


29 


— 


— 




30 


— 


25,173 


23,826 


12,274 


14 


42 


18 


— 




31 


— 


7,847 


7,544 


2,732 


2 






39 — 

— 2,743 






z 


37,747 
232 


37,725 
229 


22,126 
61 


28 
1 


— 


— 


3 : 


52 

!3 


6,2743) 














— — 




4 


2,236 J 
8,2413) 


61,221 


61,182 


19,806 


45 


3,724 


8 


— 




5 


1,792 J 


309,984 
2,373 


327,662 
1,925 


140,037 
778 


209 
2 


5,070 
542 


288 
254 


— — 


— ; 
10 ; 


6 

7 




1,839 


2,001 


401 


8 


50 


50 


— — 


— 3 


8 



118 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



13 



40 



PlTTSFIELD Con. 

Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Lebanon 

Ave 

Pittsfield Day Nursery Association, 141 Francis 

Ave. ......... 

Pittsfield Young Men's Christian Association, The, 

292 North St 

St. Luke's Hospital of Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Inc., 379 East St. (156 beds) .... 
Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield, Mass., 

33 Pearl St 

Plymouth 
Boys' Club of Plymouth, The .... 

Chiltonville Community Club, Inc. 
Jordan Hospital, The (1,109 beds) 
Long Pond Ladies Aid Society .... 

Plymouth Community Nurse Association, Incor- 
porated ........ 

Plymouth Fragment Society .... 

Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of the . 

Princeton 
Girl's Vacation House Association, The 



Provincetown 

14 Provincetown Helping Hand Society . 

QUINCY 

15 Arab-American Banner Society, The, 66 Winter St 

16 Atlantic Women's Club, Inc., The 

17 City Hospital of Quincy (Income paid to City of 

Quincy for hospital purposes) . 

18 Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Massachusetts 

The, 1359 Hancock St. . _. . ._ ■ 

19 Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of Quincy, 

Mass., 25 Foster St 

20 Quincy Community Fund Inc., 1535 Hancock St 

21 Quincy Council Girl Scouts, Inc., 1245 Hancock St 

22 Quincy Council Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America 

1135 Hancock St 

23 Quincy Day Nursery Association . 

24 Quincy Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 1245 

Hancock St. ..... 

25 Quincy Women's Club, 148 President's Lane 

26 Sailors Snug Harbor, of Boston, Palmer St. 

27 William B. Rice Eventide Home, 215 Adams St. 

28 Wollaston Woman's Club, 22 Beale St. 

29 Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy 

Mass., The, 61 Washington St. 

Randolph 

30 Boston School for the Deaf .... 

31 Seth Mann, 2d, Home for Aged and Infirm Women 

The 



Reading 

32 Reading Home for Aged Women 

33 Reading Visiting Nurse Association 

Revere 

34 Beachmont Catholic Club, 714 Winthrop Ave. 

35 Franco- American Club of Revere Inc. 1 

36 Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association of Revere 

37 Ingleside Corporation, The, 148 Prospect Ave. 

38 Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

Rockland 

39 French Home for Aged Women, The* . 



Rutland 
Central New England Sanatorium, Incorporated 

(75 beds) ... . 

Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc. 
Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational 

Association ....... 



$88,942 


$4,853 


$5,421 


16,340 


4,063 


634 


487,243 


15,575 


50,838 


545,254 


12,186 


144,403 


30,294 


13,122 


7,039 


25,091 

205 

383,878 

1,788 


1,917 
50 

3,830 
11 


287 

456 

57,025 

204 


4,835 
51,260 
99,306 


2,409 

63 

3,653 


1,511 

305 


39,381 


859 


1,750 


69,742 


— 


— 


219 
1,612 


317 
56 


33 



123,192 
16,854 



348,262 
2,328 



786 



6,220 



31,431 
500 



585 



302 



8,500 
2,084 
6,725 


1,300 

64,120 

2,696 


603 


29,168 
4,202 


7,569 

17 


4,812 


3,911 

37,225 
377,701 
571,614 

14,732 


3,809 
2,790 

1,607 
1,624 


7,906 
3,055 

128 
1,000 

745 


132,723 


14,835 


22,814 


454,917 


21,335 


84,734 


247,106 


— 


1,461 


68,053 
6,898 


657 
1,628 


1,794 
2,323 


4,582 


351 


859 


290 

84,099 

7,444 


558 
1,907 
2,183 


931 

174 

4,674 



31,990 
225 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Visits. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



t. II. 

haritable Corporations — Continued. 



119 



Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


c 


SERVICE 01 


t Relief Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 






$12,907 


$12,907 


$6,122 


10 


23 










1 


— 


4,843' 


4,877 


2,952 


3 


29 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


68,411 


70,168 


28,078 


28 


- 


— 


— 


5,556 


— 


3 


— 


156,589 


157,182 


38,194 


112 


5,982 


377 


— 


— 


— 


4 


$2,C;00 3 


21,147 


21,578 


16,963 


13 


18,3152 


10,7612 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


2,646 

506 

71,027 

215 


2,677 

523 

77,267 

335 


1,168 

41 

39,910 


3 

1 
50 


1,388 


— 


— 


364 


4 
2 


6 
7 
8 
9 


. -900 " 


3,993 
2,630 
4,281 


4,226 
1,846 
3,935 


2,924 
825 


2 

1 


3,6292 

7 


2,2722 


69 


— 


6 


10 

11 
12 


— 


3,643 


3,813 


1,697 


8 


156 


5 


— 


— 


— 


13 


— 


2,328 


1.152 


9 


1 


— 


— 


57 


— 


1 


14 


-. 


- 354 
9S 


399 
142 


45 


1 


5 


5 





— 


6 
2 


15 
16 


— 


4.893 


4,740 


600 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


17 


— 


7,065 


7,382 


3,736 


3 


— 


— 


732 


— 


— 


18 


100 


1,300 

64,355 

3,400 


1.300 

60.048 

3,498 


750 
3,217 

1,500 


1 
5 
1 


— 


— 


23 


499 


1 
11 


19 
20 
21 


— 


12.484 
120 


11,392 
119 


4,408 


2 


— 


— 


— 


1,913 


3 


22 
23 


5633 


11,934 

5,936 

13,100 

20,456 

2,383 


12.328 

5,139 

12,966 

20,042 

2,600 


9.720 

320 

3,594 

7,252 


6 
1 
5 
9 


13,4422 
20 
18 
27 
29 


4,749 2 

20 
18 

27 


9 


— 


15 
20 


24 
25 
26 
27 

28 


— 


39,328 


37,565 


15,483 


36 


— 


— 


— 


1,724 


29 


29 


— 


106,366 


90,384 


43,207 


51 


166 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 


— 


9,218 


7,767 


3,853 


9 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


31 


11,004 


5.352 
3,957 


4,565 
3,662 


1,475 
3,166 


3 
2 


10 
3,3892 


5302 


— 


— 


— 


32 

33 


:2,025 


1.210 

1.490 
6,996 
6,946 


1,426 

1,636 

11,687 

5,895 


119 

5,847 
5,251 


1 

7 
3 


18 
7,2602 


9 
1,7142 


20 
40 


— 


1 
10 


34 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 


— 


63,421 

500 


63,220 
464 


24,037 
156 


17 

1 


37 
250 


7 
250 


10 





— 


40 

41 


1 — 


819 


791 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


42 



120 



P.D 

Abstracts of Reports of Privc 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Salem 

1 Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute 

Women, in Salem, 180 Derby St.3 . 

2 Bertram Home for Aged Men, 29 Washington Sq. 

3 Children's Island Sanitarium, The, Lowell Island 

(94 beds)2 

4 Family Service Association of Salem, 126 Washing- 

ton St 

5 Hebrew Educational and Community Center of 

Salem, 287 Lafayette St 

6 Home for Aged Women in Salem, 180 Derby St. 

7 House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, 

The, 54 Turner St.i 

•8 Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, The, 

250 Derby St 

9 Mack Industrial School ..... 

10 Marine Society at Salem in New England, 18 

Washington Sq. ...... 

11 North Shore Babies Hospital, The, 49 Dearborn 

St. (50 beds) 

12 North Shore Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

176 Essex St.l . 

13 Plummer Farm School, Winter Island 

14 Salem Animal Rescue League, 103^ Foster St. . 

15 Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuber- 

culosis, 5 St. Peter St. . 

16 Salem Charitable Mechanic Association 

17 Salem East India Marine Society, Trustees of the, 

161 Essex St. 

18 Salem Female Charitable Society, The 

19 Salem Fraternity, 11 Central St.l 

20 Salem Hebrew Ladies Aid Society 

21 Salem Hospital, 81 Highland Ave. (156 beds) 

22 Salem Relief Committee (Inc.) 250 Derby St. . 

23 Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend 

Society, 7 Carpenter St. ..... 

24 Salem Young Men's Christian Association, 288 

Essex St. ....... . 

25 Salem Young Women's Association, The, 18 Brown 

St 

26 Samaritan Society ...... 

27 Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association . 

28 Woman's Friend Society, 12 Hawthorne Boulevard 

Sandwich 

29 Sandwich Health Association, Incorporated . 

Saugus 

30 Bristow Street Civic Association .... 

31 Saugus Visiting Nurse Association 

32 Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The 

Scituate 

33 Arwile Inc. ..... 

34 Children's Sunlight Hospital (70 beds) 

35 Lydia Collett Corporation, The .... 

Sharon 

36 Jewish Community Centre of Sharon, Incorporated 

37 Sharon Civic Foundation, The .... 

38 Sharon Hebrew Ladies Aid, Incorporated, The . 

39 Sharon Sanatorium, The (50 beds) 

Sherborn 

40 Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolent Society, 

The 

Shirley 

41 Altrurian Club of Shirley, The .... 

Shrewsbury 

42 Army & Navy Social & Service Club of Shrewsbury 

Somerville 

43 Associated Charities of Somerville, 261 Pearl St.7 

44 Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women, 

117 Summer St. 



$324,569 


— 


— 


112,825 


$14,989 


— 


22,286 


451 


$5,984 


11,555 
359,627 


2,591 
317 


3,652 
1,000 


118,503 
72,730 


— 


25 


153,305 


— 


— 


202,580 


13,918 


3,262 


176,883 
19,564 


50 
257 


3,305 
159 


27,198 
2,025 


6,291 


614 


35,061 
56,451 


190 


— 


951 


456 


1,012 


1,740,948 
9,367 


7,230 
750 


250,327 
364 


230,752 


170 


3,382 


307,012 


10,786 


7,140 


64,592 

36,898 

129,824 

113,398 


348 

112 

20 

1,655 


2,416 
5 

10,146 



34 



213 



619 



595 

268 

4,127 


147 
950 
158 


92 
663 
383 


2,500 

03,926 

2,343 


10,354 
9 


1,000 
318 


3,789 

8,506 

810 

33,311 


1,597 
283 
238 

8,194 


1,984 

15 

1,124 

19,804 


15,585 


10 


— 


3,186 


165 


304 


10 


87 


45 


78,521 


1,904 


24 



6,7. 



2,6 



None. i No report. 2 Report for 14 months. 3 Name changed to Home for Aged Women in Sa 



II. 

aritable Corporations — Continued. 



121 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 


Service or Relief Given To 










Officers 






Families 




and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ship 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





Organi- 
zations 



$44 


$13,186 


$12,153 


$4,528 


7 


23 


23 


— 


— 


18,716 


20,314 


7,767 


27 


100 


100 


— 


— 


7,447 


12,725 


4,824 


4 


— 


— 


206 


— 


6,244 
13,567 


2,633 
22,738 


500 
9,836 


1 

15 


27 


— 


— 


— 


6,026 
2,978 


6,914 
3,544 


3,734 
75 


6 

1 


369 
16 


369 
16 


— 


',55841 
2,759 ) 


6,365 

26,013 


4,897 

33,101 


600 
13,758 


2 
11 


12 
493 


12 
255 




75 


9,678 
1,103 


10,443 
1,864 


4,845 
1,280 


6 

1 


39 
2,5676 


15 
1,1306 


— 


— 


7,343 
60 


8,355 
25 


4,005 


13 


378 


378 


— 


2,0004 


1,748 
2,606 


1,341 
2,688 


300 


1 


7 
70 


7 
70 


— 


5,29841 
U74 j 


1,468 

284,214 
1,480 


965 

301,340 
1,781 


153,853 
1,100 


240 
1 


15 
8,536 


15 
3,179 


32 
104 


5,300 


17,861 


12,937 


6,062 


11 


65 


10 


— 


300 


25,391 


26,469 


11,662 


11 


— 


— 


— 


[,763 
5,645 


5,921 

5,057 

6,099 

15,416 


3,544 

1,249 

6,660 

15,465 


1,533 

300 
7,287 


2 

1 

8 


101 
17 
35 

730 


5 
17 
35 


39 



5004 



,0004 



833 



855 



508 



1,4765 1,2965 



244 

1,613 

612 


198 

1,506 
548 


1,299 


1 


— 


11,835 
327 


12,147 
283 


5,789 
37 


23 
1 


115 


3,881 

298 

1,380 

45,108 


1,952 

283 

1,808 

50,790 


23,485 


27 


48 
70 


488 


505 


— 


— 


9 


469 


466 


51 


1 


— 


132 


174 


— 


— 


60 


4,607 


4,659 


1,815 


2 


— 



115 



60 



550 



1,076 



5 
328 



10 



5 
300 



16 



14 



20 



estricted to capital. 5 Visits. 6 Animals. 7 Report for 9 months. 



122 










P.D. 1 






Abstracts of Reports o 


/ Priva 




• 








■ Interest 






Total 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 


Dividend 




Name and Address 


Assets 


tions and 


and 


Annuitie 






Reported 


Gifts 


Refunds 


and Rent; i 




SOMERVILLE Con. 










i 


Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 












186 Highland Ave. (See also Boston) 


$277,538 


$36,499 


— 


— ' 


2 


Portuguese-American Civic League of Cambridge 












and Somerville Inc., 26 Springfield St. . 


7,333 


457 


$1,164 


— 


3 


Somerville Home for the Aged, 117 Summer St. 


668,705 


502 


4,909 


$19,766 ! i 


4 


Somerville Hospital, 36 Crocker St. (112 beds) . 


458,404 


1,534 


184,917 


4,445< 


5 


Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association, The 


1,768 


139 


648 


3 


6 


Somerville Rotary Educational Fund, Inc. . 


6,373 


— 


671 


1^ 


7 


Somerville Young Men's Christian Association, 












101 Highland Ave 

Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts, 85 Central St. 


229,932 


33,013 


11,514 


ioei 


S 








: 




8,302 


421 


7,679 


121 


9 


Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville . 

SOUTHBOROUGH 


6,196 






i5e 


10 


Waucho Beneficent Corporation .... 

SOUTHBRIDGE 


41 


356 






11 


Harrington Hospital Corporation (40 beds) 


272,539 


10,122 


51,402 


6,94* 


12 


Southbridge Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. _ . 


4,433 


1,767 


1,407 


15( 


13 


Young Men's Christian Association of Southbridge 1 
Spencer 










14 


Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse As- 












sociation ........ 


18,906 


912 


712 


46< 




Springfield 










15 


Abbie Frances Lawton Memorial Home, 175 












Bowdoin St. ....... 


23,870 


4,866 


363 


— 


16 


American International College, 963 State St. 


'345,^27 


10,363 


153,254 


3,20i 


17 


American Youth Council, Inc. 2 . 


55 


20 


— 


— 


18 


American Youth Council of Springfield, Inc., 359 












State St. . . . _ . 


8,527 


4,920 


379 


— * 


19 


Baby Feeding Association of Springfield, The, 












83 State St 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 


20 


Boys Health Camp Fund ..... 


177 


16 


2,925 


— 


21 


Catholic Woman's Club of Springfield, The, 27 












Bowdoin St. ....... 


7,790 


1,551 


1,409 


14! 


22 


Community Chest of Springfield, Massachusetts, 












Inc., 83 State St 


86,488 


292,707 


492 


1,15: 


23 


Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of 












Mercy, 18 Margaret St. (See also Milford) . 


368 


1,508 


325 


( 


24 


Cummings Memorial, 36 Willow St. . 


103,587 


5,033 


8,379 


— 


25 


Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association, 1862 












Main St 


16,019 


404 


9,319 


— 


26 


Doane Orphanage Trust Foundation 


53,814 


— 


— 


2,30! 


27 


Dunbar Community League, Inc., 643 Union St. 


230,705 


16,449 


13,226 


9,66. 


28 


Family Welfare Association of Springfield, 83 












State St. . . . 


162,900 


39,511 


758 


5,96, 


29 


Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, Mass., 












The, 584 Wilbraham Rd 


242,110 


21,750 


29,817 


— 


30 


Good Will, Inc., The 


— 


■ — ■ 


— 


— 


31 


Hampden Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 












83 State St 


41,478 


17,581 


11,057 


— 


32 


Hampden County Children's Aid Association, 83 












State St 


133,235 


16,844 


22,209 


5,64 


33 


Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public Health 








■ 




Association, 145 State St. .... 


43,034 


18,533 


3,055 


26' 


34 


Hampton Club, Inc. of Springfield, Mass. . 


523 


172 


198 


■ 


35 


Horace Smith Fund, The ..... 


397,442 


— 


5,335 


18,63 


36 


James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of the* 










37 


Jewish Social Service Bureau, Inc., 1862 Main St. 


— 


8,723 


1,546 


— '-• 


38 


Junior Achievement, Incorporated, 33 Pearl St. . 


83,936 


2,844 


946 


— 


39 


Legal Aid Society of Springfield, Massachusetts, 












Inc., The, 182 State St 


241 


6,014 


555 


— 


40 


Mercy Hospital of Springfield, Mass., The, 233 












Carew St. (330 beds) 


997,864 


3,931 


292,599 


1,65 


41 


New England District Council of the Assemblies 












of God, Inc. ....... 


114 


349 


— 


— ■ 


42 


Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent 
de Paul of Springfield, Mass., The, 43 Edwards 












St. 


22,934 


10,591 


— 


— 


43 


St. Luke's Home for Aged Women, 85 Spring St. 


77,771 


- — ■ 


— 


— 


44 


Service League Foundation, Inc., 33 Pearl St. . 


644,567 


— 


— 


20,84 


45 


Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children, The, 












516 Carew St. (60 beds) 


1,278,363 


58,843 


2,025 


22,28 


46 


Springfield Boys' Club, 260 Chestnut St. 


277,879 


21,656 


10,889 


1,06 




— None. l No report. 2 Report for 2 months. 


3 Restrictec 


to capital. 


4 Not stated. 



1 - n - 

jj laritable Corporations- — Continued. 



123 



£2,839 



810 
40 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$39,338 $46,364 



1,623 

26,262 

190,938 

791 

688 

45,117 

8,263 
156 



356 



1,186 

25,544 

189,515 

1,003 

1,094 

34,574 

7,676 
401 



372 



$120 
11,880 
85,432 



1 

12 

118 



13,789 11 

6,474 4 



220 

350 

58 

7,213 



9,292;" 



220 

350 

43 



1,046 



68,474 
3,331 


70,898 
3,204 


31,672 
1,831 


40 
2 


1,258 
2,7895 


7275 


2,088 


2,036 


1,652 


2 


2,0905 


1,0615 


5,229 


5,125 


2,479 


4 


34 


31 


169,725 

20 


167,088 
35 


93,134 


62 


300 


— 



49 



5,300 



2,826 



700 



— 204 



— 


2,941 


2,887 


— 


— 


97 


— 


— 


— 


1 


lb 

2C 


— 


3,107 


3,526 


— 


— 


280 


280 


. 4 








21 


— 


294,354 


280,483 


7,026 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


22 


— 


1,840 
13,412 


2,410 
13,351 


3,667 


12 


2,320 
37,4136 


2,320 
17,7246 


75 


— 


3 

14 


23 

24 


— 


9,724 

2,309 

39,434 


10,885 

2,278 

37,914 


240 
12,221 


1 
51 


86 

10 

347 


86 
10 


22 


— 


— 


25 
1(. 
27 


— 


46,237 


45,441 


18,597 


11 


— 


— 


3,318 





__ 


28 


7,679 


69,247 


65,281 


5,858 


6 


126 


116 


— 


— 


— 


29 


— 


28,639 


27,054 


9,734 


5 


— 


— 





5,297 




31 


— 


44,700 


45,345 


10,179 


7 


282 


17 


— 








32 


1,081 


22,935 

376 

23,970 


20,079 

246 

17,056 


8,753 

1,103 


24 
4 


361 
90 


361 

— 4 


— 


— 


4 


33 

34 
3 5 


— 


10,269 
3,790 


9,845 
1,986 


3,022 


3 


— 


— 


368 


— 


— 


36 
37 

38 


— 


6,569 


6,567 


5,589 


4 


3,180 


3,117 


— 


— 


20 


.VJ 


300 


298,189 


244,341 


80,508 


97 


10,504 


3,271 


— 


. 





40 


— 


349 


500 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


41 


— 


10,591 
20,847 


11,685 

1,775 

24,852 


2,100 


3 


54 


54 


243 


— 


6 


42 

43 
44 


3,620 


105,768 
33,781 


90,315 
33,955 


45,562 
14,820 


53 
20 


2,147 


2,147 


— 


2,842 


— 


45 
46 


/isits. 


6 Attendance 





















124 



P.D 

Abstracts of Reports of Privc 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Springfield — Con. _ 

1 Springfield Day Nursery Corporation, 103 William 

St $166,660 $3,880 $1,668 

2 Springfield Girls Club, 285 Chestnut St. . . 74,790 9,423 3,579 

3 Springfield Girl Scouts Inc., 83 State St. . . 1,314 7,905 18,816 

4 Springfield Goodwill Industries, Inc., 139 Lyman St. 92,451 2,930 23,236 

5 Springfield Home for Aged Men, 74 Walnut St. . 414,658 2,217 

6 Springfield Home for Aged Women, 471 Chestnut 

St _ 559,807 4,946 2,600 

7 Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 

Children, 136 William St 447,790 6,515 3,300 

8 Springfield Hospital, The, 759 Chestnut St. (261 

beds) 5,172,111 21,323 319,610 

9 Springfield Jewish Home for the Aged, 44 Copley 

Terrace . 70,502 56,561 

10 Springfield League for the Hard of Hearing, Inc., 

1694 Main St. . # 385 456 637 

11 Springfield Rescue Mission, The 3 

12 Springfield Young Men's Christian Association, 

The, 122 Chestnut St. . . . . . 1,383,938 26,199 216,287 

13 Springfield Young Women's Christian Association, 

6 Howard St 283,886 8,403 36,513 

14 Travelers Aid Society of Springfield, Massachu- 

setts, Union Station . _ . . . . . 185 4,949 401 

15 Visiting Nurse Association of Springfield, The, 

83 State St 5,772 22,151 15,199 

16 Wesson Maternity Hospital, 120 High St. (62 beds) 621,167 6,741 92,439 

17 Wesson Memorial Hospital, 140 High St. (120 beds) 926,191 2,290 129,876 

18 Y. M. H. A. Camp, Inc 9,000 1,723 3,259 

Stockbridge 

19 Austen Riggs Foundation Inc. (30 beds) . . 472,397 17,178 75,633 

Stoneham 

20 Home for Aged People in Stoneham, The . . 255,758 421 422 

21 New England Sanitarium and Benevolent Associa- 

tion (140 beds) 417,500 — 484,219 

22 Stoneham Visiting Nurse Association . . . 13,199 948 1,597 

Stoughton 

23 South Stoughton Community Service, Inc. . . 3,130 — 314 

Stow 

24 Red Acre Farm, Incorporated .... 352,622 360 826 

Sudbury 

25 Sudbury Public Health Nursing Association, Inc. 1 

Sutton 

26 Wilkinsonville Community Association . . 1,360 — — 

Swampscott » 

27 Swampscott Visiting Nurse and Family Welfare 

Association, The ...... 4,602 7,716 565 

Swansea 

28 Frank S. Stevens Home for Boys, Inc. . . — — — 

29 Rest House, Inc. . . . . . . . 210,758 — , 6,705 

Taunton 

30 Annawon Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 

12 Weir St 3,598 6,023 3,230 

31 Bethlehem Home, 61 Summer St. ... 208,576 3,208 — 

32 Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society of Taunton, 

The 106 184 175 

33 Morton Hospital, 88 Washington St.i 

34 Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton, 31 

Court St 33,150 2,923 424 

35 Taunton Female Charitable Association, 96 Broad- 

way 157,636 212 3,895 

36 Taunton Girls Club, Incorporated, The, Dean St. 17,695 1,433 139 

37 Taunton Visiting Nurse Association Inc., The, 14 

Church Green 41,085 3,711 6,518 

38 Taunton Woman's Club, The, 27 Summer St. . 1,041 640 1,697 

39 Young Men's Christian Association, of Taunton, 

71 Cohannet St 35,054 2,486 4,603 

— None. i No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Name changed to Cummings Memorial. 



$5,79 



32 
7,4 
2 
1 
18,72 



7,2 



5,3; 
5 



1 II. 


















125 


■haritable 


Corporations — Continued. 




* 


















Paid 


<; 


>ervice or Relief 


Given To 




















Current 


Current 


Salaries 


Officers 






Families 








i Legacies 


Receipts 


Expendi- 


and 


and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Organi- 








tures 


Wages 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


ship 


zations 




— 


$11,350 


$11,601 


$7,285 


11 


77 


10 








1 


— 


13,003 


12,999 


7,080 


12 


— 


— 





51,839 





2 


— 


26,724 


24,658 


6,781 


3 


— 








2,047 




3 


— 


35,207 


35,418 


20,396 


39 


137 


98 







2 


4 


— 


18,685 


13,572 


3,73^ 


5 


13 


2 


— 


— 


— 


5 


. 


31,371 


33,960 


13,938 


15 


59 











6 


25,165*7 
160' J 






















22,382 


30,560 


16,624 


26 


156 


57 


10 


— 


— 


7 


— 


436,722 


435,142 


202,217 


238 


10,259 


4,120 


— 


— 


— 


8 


— 


56,561 


54,059 


1,888 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


1,093 


968 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


10 

11 


804 


252,578 


239,456 


98,125 


78 


— 


— 


— 


6,273 


50 


12 


— 


48,859 


47,849 


23,967 


20 


— 


— 


— 


13,767 


— 


13 


— 


5,350 


5,375 


4,284 


3 


3,144 


— 2 


161 


— 


— 


14 



37,410 37,933 29,334 31 32,2245 15,5265 

105,591 107,298 59,851 67 2,349 97 

144,324 134,945 67,357 129 3,469 36 

4,982 4,832 874 19 237 63 



— . 


93,137 


113,264 


43,725 


37 


439 


293 


— 


— 


— 


19 


(1,00041 
12,000 J 


10,271 


8,283 


2,393 


4 


10 


— 











20 


.2,9064 
' 1,000 


484,219 
3,821 


473,013 
4,167 


189,744 
2,092 


167 

2 


3,890 
2,2135 


155 
4725 


— 


— 


— 


21 
22 


— 


493 


495 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


1 ' 


23 


; — 


19,910 


13,647 


5,586 


5 


2,6476 


2,6446 


— 


— 


19 


24 
25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


— 


8,282 


7,144 


4,227 


4 


2,9455 


1,4295 


— 


— 


— 


27 










_ 












28 




13,989 


16,196 


6,004 


7 


3,223 


— ' 


— 


— 


— 


29 


300 


9,253 
3,514 


9,079 
3,352 


3,585 


2 


276 . 


273 


40 


1,419 


23 


30 
31 


— 


360 


363 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


3 


32 
33 


— 


3,348 


2,700 


1,463 


4 


— 


— 


— 


792 


— 


34 


55,400 


14,831 
1,578 


5,175 
1,570 


2,627 
640 


6 
2 


13 


13 


— 


103 


— 


35 
36 


250 


11,054 
2,337 


12,842 
2,012 


9,132 


7 


10,1805 


2,3656 


— 


— 


5 


37 

38 


— 


7,089 


6,783 


3,577 


4 


— 


— 


— 


290 


5 


39 


[(Restricted 


to capital. 


5 Visits. 


6 Animals 

















126 



P.D. 1 

Abstracts of Reports of Priva 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Templeton 

1 Hospital Cottages for Children, The (135 beds) . 

2 Ladies Social Circle Branch Alliance, Incorporated 

3 Woman's Board of the Hospital Cottages for 

Children at Baldwinville, Massachusetts, The . 

Topsfield 

4 Children's Summer School, Inc 

5 Topsfield Community Club ..... 

Uxbridge 

6 H. H. Legge Relief Corps #153, Incorporated . 

7 Uxbridge Samaritan Society .... 

Wakefield 

8 Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women . 

9 Wakefield Hebrew Ladies Charitable Society 

10 Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association! 

11 Wakefield Young Men's Christian Association, The 

Walpole 

12 Old Colony Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America 

13 Old Colony Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America 

(Camp Child) 

14 Walpole Council of Girl Scouts, Inc. . 

15 Walpole Visiting Nurse Association 

Waltham 

16 Boys' Club of Waltham, Inc., 686 Main St. 

17 Hamblin L. Hovey Institute, Inc., 545 Main St. 

18 Jonas Willis Parmenter Rest Home, Inc., 542 

Main St 

19 Leland Home for Aged Women, The, 21 Newton St. 

20 Mount Prospect School, The, 90 Worcester Lane 

21 Waltham Baby Hospital, The, 759 Main St. (22 

beds) ......... 

22 Waltham Community Fund, Inc., 657 Main St. . 

23 Waltham District Nursing Association, Hope Ave. 

24 Waltham Family Service League, 680 Main St. . 

25 Waltham Graduate Nurses Association 

26 Waltham Hospital, The, Hope Ave., (216 beds) . 

27 Waltham Social Service League, 680 Main St.3 . 

Ware 

28 Mary Lane Hospital Association (38 beds) . 

Wareham 

29 Tobey Hospital (not in operation) 

Warren 

30 South Warren Community, Incorporated, The 

Watertown 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 
the Blind (Kindergarten and Institution De- 
partments), 175 North Beacon St. . 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 
the Blind (Howe Memorial Press Fund) 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 
the Blind (Works Department) 

Watertown Associated Charities, The . 

Watertown District Nursing Association, 83 Spring 

Watertown Home for Old Folks, 120 Mt. Auburn 
St 



31 



36 



Webster 
37 Webster District Hospital (23 beds) 



Wellesley 
Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, The 
Wellesley Community Chest, Incorporated . 
Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 
Wellesley Hospital Fund, Incorporated 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc., The . 



Wenham 
43 Iron Rail Vacation Home 



16,852 
8,742 


$8,650 
34 


$54,774 
177 


30,227 


561 


404 


3,580 
1,247 


8,770 
808 


431 
1,426 


7,418 
7,222 


86 
1,673 


182 
2,869 


84,338 
123 


1,572 
244 


829 


56,792 


4,422 


2,787 



66 



109,378 



90,686 



7,258 



146 



30,095 

1,992 

325 


248 
698 
688 


7,746 

260 

1,153 


21 


1,329 

343,782 


5,555 


978 


7,32! 


366,702 

254,073 

87,213 


332 


500 


13,32 

9,08( 

14,69( 


61,146 

24 

31,130 

4,869 

14,931 

1,207,251 


336 

39,310 

2,635 

5,029 

362 

30,485 


1,863 

13,545 

6 
164,965 


2,35 
13 

1,62< 
24 
64 

9,77 


311,527 


1,288 


29,721 


2,55 


1,107,858 


— 


— 


13,51 


163 


11 








6,151,667 


5,622 


150,043 


193,26 


275,836 


— 


16,223 


15,10 


1,090 


3 


45,684 


3 


18,099 


189 


4,703 


51 


111,873 


338 


— 


5,21 



479 



30,667 



792,788 


35,297 


8,599 


5,657 


26,728 


— 


12,960 


9,646 


4,117 


103,443 


— 


— 


183,493 


21,854. 


10,498 



42,517 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Not stated. 



3 Name changed to Waltham Family Service League. 



t. II. 

haritable Corporations 



127 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Givew To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$78,341 
800 


$95,377 
709 


$45,715 


76 


147 


13 


30 


1,945 


1,948 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9,201 
2,260 


9,339 

2,585 


3,331 
1,793 


11 
1 


82 ' 
1,2055 


15 
85 


— 


268 
4,950 


225 
4,568 


3,587 


3 


3,6645 


1,6295 


— 


4,082 
244 


4,278 
268 


1,554 


3 


12 


— 


— 


7,997 


8,665 


4,304 


4 












16 



457 



7,404 

7,995 

958 

2,246 



8,234 

7,399 

1,184 
2,533 



3,577 

1,425 
205 
773 



350 — 

101 49 

3,4155 ' —2 



40 



1,332 — 



2,825* 

5004] 
2,520 j 



0,250 



0,757 



7,660* 



,034 



254 



6,533 
7,328 

13,325 

9,933 

14,690 

7,074 

39,441 

17,815 

5,274 

1,013 

211,404 



54,322 

13,517 

16 



36,180 



78,405 
26,819 
13,766 
4,298 
32,231 



6,638 
8,729 

11,313 

7,726 

15,166 

5,905 

39,416 

9,164 

5,350 

788 

221,877 



49,334 

1,329 

14 



5,144 
3,142 

4,600 
2,740 
8,346 

3,977 
3,307 
7,844 
2,385 

96,619 



561 



199 



22,884 25 

100 2 



34, 



80,088 
21,650 
12,640 
4,048 
34,012 



43,654 44,093 



15,799 



38,364 

394 

6,212 

6,510 



12,133 



17 



10 



484 



20 
4,773 



1,250 



9,7395 5,9965 



20 
201 



343,312 


359,614 


191,441 


186 


271 


16 


31,330 


31,272 


2,200 


10 


— 


— 


45,684 
35 


47,093 

25 


28,908 


33 


— 


— 


5,408 


8,035 


6,669 


5 


7,1855 


1,7385 


5,554 


5,430 


1,349 


3 


6 


— 



948 

536 264 

6,4915 2,7505 

180 —2 

8,938 8,938 



235 
2 



29 
1 30 



.estricted to capital. 



5 Visits. 



128 



p.d. 1; 

Abstracts of Reports of Privai 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Westborough 

1 Kirkside Inc., The ' 

2 Westborough District Nurse Association 

Westfield 

3 Noble Hospital, The Trustees of, 105 West Silver 

St. (95 beds) 

4 Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The, 41 

Broad St 

5 Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the Destitute, 

The, 160 Franklin St 

6 Westfield Girl Scouts, Inc., 97 Court St. . 

7 Young Men's Christian Association of Westfield, 

The, 105 Elm St 

Westford 

8 Ladies' Sewing Society and Women's Branch 

Alliance of the Unitarian Church 

Weston 

9 Weston Scouts Incorporated 2 .... 

Westport 

10 Watuppa Grange, No. 365, Patrons of Husbandry, 

Incorporated ....... 

West Springfield 

11 Horace A. Moses Foundation Incorporated 

12 West Springfield Neighborhood House Association 

Westwood 

13 Scoutland, Inc. . . . 

14 Westwood Community Health Association . 

Weymouth 

15 Weymouth Hospital 1 ...... 

16 Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

Whitman 

17 Rogers Home for Aged Women .... 

18 Whitman Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 

Wilbraham 

19 Wilbraham Horse Show Association, Inc. . 

WlLLIAMSTOWN 

20 Williamstown Welfare Association 

Wilmington 

21 Silver Lake Betterment Association, Incorporated, 

The ......... 

WlNCHENDON 

22 Winchendon Boys Club, Inc. .... 

23 Winchendon Hospital, Incorporated 

Winchester 

24 Fellsland Council Inc. Boy Scouts of America . 

25 Home for Aged People in Winchester, The . 

26 Winchester Community Chest, Incorporated . 

27 Winchester District Nursing Association 

28 Winchester Hospital (65 beds) .... 

Winthrop 

29 Tifareth Israel Congregation of Winthropl . 

30 Winthrop Community Hospital Aid Association, 

Incorporated, The ...... 

31 Winthrop Community Hospital, Incorporated (44 

beds) 

32 Winthrop Hebrew Community Association, Inc.i 

33 Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association Incorporated 

WOBURN 

34 Home for Aged Women in Woburn, 74 Elm St.l 

35 Winning Home ....... 

— None. i No report. ^ Report for 9 months. 



$84,864 
3,930 


$1,050 
88 


$1,188 
568 


851,040 


6,204 


55,900 


63,909 


— 


7,313 


139,437 
1,370 


— 


230 



96,671 

11,347 

2,758 

13,333 



3,150,084 
1,013 



79,401 
1,854 



1,559 



10,758 

212,711 

237 

3,503 

498,653 



6,069 



615 



12,248 



5,601 
2,075 



3,360 



6,150 

1,814 

1,482 
12,306 



89 166 

226,428 2,051 

2,406 1,348 

68,820 — 



951 



— 40 

1,208 1,744 



1,590 



3,442 
36 



109 
665 



1,865 



40,283 
4,191 


267 
1,974 


14 
1,367 


199 


403 


1,277 


7,594 


7,408 


— 


3,409 


57 


1,009 


9,557 
1,075 


892 
322 


758 



6,052 
1,547 



2,488 
102,476 



497 

73,452 

2,119 



78 
3,852 



10( 



3 Restricted to capital. 4 Not stated. 



5 Vis 



171. II. 
aritable Corporations — Continued. 



129 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given To 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Member- 
ship 



Organi- 
zations 



$4,545 
661 



1,0923 86,612 

1,0003 8,241 

2253 5,836 



8,3903 



7,427 



$3,687 
685 



92,631 
9,433 
6,474 

7,954 



$1,720 
434 



48,991 
3,494 
1,822 

4,460 



287 364 
2,962 804 



2,220 



2,497 



265 



1,066 



1,034 



1,768 



1,793 



2,6105 1,3255 

1,689 44 
16 
18 7 



58,128 
12,284 


43,747 
12,271 


6,485 
7,264 


4 
5 


6 


— 


6,268 

2,740 


5,640 
2,497 


2,338 
1,872 


2 
2 


2,1975 


3005 


5,274 


5,429 


4,501 


3 


5,6135 


2,1195 


1,600 
3,425 


2,346 
3,313 


935 
1,965 


2 
2 


4 
2,3995 


— 4 


1,707 


1,157 


100 


1 


— 


— 


7,614 


7,584 


2,365 


3 


569 


569 



— 


1,650 
335 


1,507 


291 


1 


200 


200 


2,0003) 
2,541 J 


12,314 
12,658 


11,652 
13,161 


3,136 
4,166 


2 
7 


18 


— 


2,0003 


4,049 
118,635 


262 

4,520 

107,185 


3,575 
60,268 


3 

57 


3,8095 
1,841 


5875 
45 





663 


648 








— 


— 


5,0183 


75,603 


76,872 


36,282 


35 


2,258 


11 


100 


3,574 


3,271 


2,936 


2 


2,7195 


2185 



10 



46 



387 



180 



1,247 
2,500 



78 



1,012 — 



130 



P.D. 

Abstracts of Reports of Prh 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Intere 
Dividei 

Annuil 
and Rer 



Woburn — Con. 
Woburn Charitable Association (operating Charles 

Choate Memorial Hospital), 21 Warren Ave. 

(41 beds) 

Young Men's Christian Association of W oburn, 

Mass.. The, 555 Main St. .... 

Worcester 
Angora Orphan Aid Association, The* 
Associated Charities of Worcester, The, 2 State St.l 
Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, 

46 High St 

Bais Hatveloh, 24 Arlington St 

Board of the Swedish Lutheran Old Peoples Home, 

of Worcester, Mass., Inc., The, 26 Harvard St. 
Camp Fire Girls of Worcester, Inc., 201 Com- 
mercial St. ....... 

Child Guidance Association of Worcester, 21 

Catharine St. ...... 

Community Chest of Worcester, Massachusetts, 

Inc.. The, Lincoln Sq. ..... 

Fairlawn Hospital, Inc., 189 May St. (47 beds) . 
Fraternite Franco- Americaine, Worcester Branch, 

Inc. ......... 

Friendly House, Inc., 38 Wall St. 

Girls' League for Service, Inc., 274 Main St. 

Girls Welfare Society of Worcester Inc., 5 Clare- 

mont St. ....... . 

Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester. The, 20 Vernon 

St 

Harpoot Assyrian United Association of America, 

Thei 

Hebrew Free Loan Society, Inc. of Worcester 
Home Association for Aged Colored People, 63 

Parker St 

Home for Aged Men in Worcester, 1199 Main St. 
Home for Aged Women in the city of Worcester, 

The, Trustees of the, 1183 Main St. 
Hospital Louis Pasteur (not in operation) 1 
Italian American War Veterans Association, Inc. 
Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Worcester, 

Mass., Inc., 1029 Pleasant St.l 
Jewish Social Service Agency, Inc., 10 Waverly St. 
Junior League of Worcester, Inc., 2 State St. 
Lithuanian Aged Peoples Aid Society, Inc. 
Lithuanian Charitable Societv, The. 41 Providence 

St "..'... 

Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary, 37 Thome St. 
Lutheran Board of Missions, Inc., 26 Harvard St. 
Memorial Homes for the Blind, 51 Harvard St. 

(and 81 Elm St.) 

Memorial Hospital, The, 119 Belmont St. (185 

beds; 

North Worcester Aid Society, 58 Holden St. 
Odd Fellows Home of Massachusetts, 40 Randolph 

Rd. 

Osteopathic Clinic Association of Xew England, 

The, 3 Ball St 

Rest Home Association, 8 Homestead Ave. 
Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester, The . 
St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage, 133 

Granite St. ....... 

St. Vincent Hospital of Worcester, Massachusetts, 

The, 73 Vernon St. .(225 beds) 
Southern Worcester County Health Association, 

Incorporated, 5 Pleasant St. . 
Syrian Brotherhood Orthodox Society of Worcester, 

32 Wall St 

Temporary Home and Day Xursery Societv. The, 

10 Edward St 

Worcester Animal Rescue League, 139 Holden St. 
Worcester Area Council, Inc., 20 i Commercial St. 
Worcester Boys' Club, Lincoln Sq. 

Worcester Children's Friend Society, 2 State St. 
Worcester City Missionary Society, The, 80 Russell 

St 

Worcester County Association for the Blind, Inc., 

2 State St 

Worcester Employment Society, The, 2 State St. 

— None. i No report. 2 Xot stated. 



$426,601 
44,260 



575.487 
8,000 



40,552 

69.385 

977,679 

423,288 

61,714 

3,037 
161,733 



$3,225 
3,406 



6.613 
870 



665 

26,333 
62,278 

25,172 

676 

684 
5,280 



$54,078 
899 

30,584 



2,583 

10,481 

3,100 

10,433 

827 

41 
4,603 



$4,3( 



1,2C 



137,953 


5,334 


4,675 


11 


51,837 


4,475 


6,177 


- 


9,455 


4,902 


— 


1 


40,744 
260,772 


486,440 
25,242 


98 
48,637 


1.10 

91 


22 

1,513 
1,054 


6,177 
280 


54 
2,600 


- 


56,365 


13,652 


1,181 


90 


150,428 


15,138 


6,150 


4 


8,691 


337 


9,311 


- 


68.560 
552,802 


1,910 
2,185 


1,375 
4,130 


57 
16,20 


893,342 


3,137 


3,860 


33,92 


61 


153 


130 


1 


4,613 

9,665 

82 


17.083 
2,967 

30 


3,039 
3,051 


5 
15 


16,160 

511,227 

5,911 


720 
6,427 
9,404 


2,271 
33,600 


1,40 
4 


283,808 


656 


9,914 


7,36 


2,212.530 
13,366 


20,213 
328 


275,500 
844 


58,10 


855,356 


36,347 


10,438 


9,83 


822 
51,971 
44,318 


12 
4,121 
1,583 


66 • 
8,070 
2,885 


3 

68 

1,09 


405,697 


17,501 


29,339 




776,644 


1,369 


241,880 




56,935 


24,019 


59 


39 


7,157 


163 


268 


2 


219,371 


4,292 


613 


9,87 



3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Animals. 



II. 




< 














131 


ir it able 


Corporations — Continued. 














eegacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Paid 
Officers 
and 
Em- 
ployees 


Service oi 


. Relief Given To 






Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Member- 
ship 


Organi- 
zations 




9,5463 


$61,611 


$61,687 


$33,752 


2 


2,089 


36 








1 


~ 


4,361 


4,787 


3,033 


2 


— 


— 


— 


633 


— 


2 
3 


3,250 


41,656 
870 


43,694 
120 


3,932 


15 


364 


73 


19 


— 


15 


4 

5 
6 


— 


10,133 


17,533 


5,604 


5 


43 


10 


— 


— 


— 


7 


— 


10,653 


10,482 


3,181 


3 


— 


— 


— 


476 


— 


8 




4,916 


4,645 


2,959 


2 


609 


609 


— 


— 


26 


9 




487,644 
75,350 


502,484 
65,038 


15,662 
24,874 


4 
32 


1,293 


9 


— 


— 


29 


10 

11 


~ 


6,231 
2,880 


6,612 
2,841 


4,327 
1,027 


5 
3 


— 





— 


375 


E 


12 
13 
14 


— 


15,733 


15,748 


7,646 


7 


325 


44 


— 


— 


24 


15 


300 


21,635 


21,628 


7,144 


16 


1,392 


1,148 


261 


— 


6 


16 


.'2,05031 
(6,851 i 
11,652 


9,648 

60,713 
24,175 


9,841 

3,493 
19,151 


1,062 
7,781 


5 

10 


111 

6 

37 


111 


— 


— 


— 


17 

18 

19 

20 


.2,243 


114,418 
295 


35,989 

234 


11,320 


13 


37 


— 


■ — 


— 


— 2 


21 
22 
23 


— 


20,175 

6,173 

30 


20,563 

4,963 

30 


11,908 


9 


2 


2 


103 


— 


8 


24 
25 
26 
27 


3,538 

— 


2,992 

44,974 
9,445 


3,389 

37,350 
10,259 


289 
4,615 


1 
21 


165 
166 


165 

35 


45 


— 


17 


28 
29 
30 


.2,4083 


17,93-7 


16,752 


7,519 


13 


23 


— 


— 


— 


— 


31 


0,9903 

— 


338,218 
1,181 


431,345 
1,038 


226,622 


226 


14,794 


883 


— 


— 


5 


32 

33 


8,433 


75,056 


60,036 


21,960 


42 


155 


155 


— 


— 


— 


34 


— 


116 

12,878 

5,564 


63 

12,787 

4,593 


51 
4,079 

210 


1 
8 
1 


267 
21 
24 


134 
24 


— 


— 


— 


35 

36 
37 


1,7003 


43,267 


43,669 


9,671 


25 


196 


76 


— 


— 


— 


38 


6,514 


259,765 


221,402 


77,009 


135 


4,895 


135 


— 


— 


— 


39 


55 


24,524 


22,432 


8,033 


25 


4,536 


4,536 


— 


— 


3 


411 




460 


43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


41 


:2,9583 
11,0003) 
300 j 

:r6,0003 

h4,4003 
55,6203) 
515 J 


14,776 

4,962 

37,412 
75,052 

51,788 


14,173 

5,076 
37,295 
75,367 

52,005 


6,770 

2,692 
15,120 
52,825 

15,844 


9 

3 

8 

63 

9 


218 
6,3954 

195 


68 
2 229 4 

114 


20 


4,086 
7,404 


8 


42 

43 
44 
45 

46 




4,034 


3,299 


1,940 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


47 


.2,000 


778 
67,903 


896 
16,715 


2,483 


3 


~ 


— 2 


52 


— 


10 


48 
49 


■ 























132 



P.D, 
Abstracts of Reports of Privi 



Name and Address 



Total 

Assets 

Reported 



Subscrip- 
tions and 
Gifts 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interes 
Dividen 

Annuiti %£■ 
and Rem 



$3,910 

16,798 

9,915 

245 

64,054 

7,212 
10,480 

50,586 

37,727 

3,142 



$24 

12,990 

5,555 

131,671 

18,141 

61 
4,919 

197,723 

76,623 

' 930 



$4,86 
9< 1,2 

io,65( u; 

13,99 

1,27? 

7,27* 

19,47* !,0! 

8,39; 



Worcester — Con. 

1 Worcester Garden City, Inc. .... $749 

2 Worcester Girls Club House Corporation, 67 Lincoln 

St 154,861 

3 Worcester Girl Scout Council, Inc., 544 Main St. 81,795 

4 Worcester Hahnemann Hospital, 281 Lincoln St. 

(113 beds) . . 741,096 

5 Worcester Lions Club Charitable Corporation . 202 

6 Worcester Society for District Nursing, 2 State St. 425,308 

7 Worcester Swedish Charitable Association, 2 State 

St ■ . . . . 30,398 

8 Worcester Womans Club, 10 Tuckerman St. . 107,402 

9 Young Men's Christian Association of Worcester, 

The, 766 Main St ' . . 1,302,119 

10 Young Women's Christian Association of Worcester, 

6 Chatham St 774,510 

Wrentham 

11 King's Daughters and Sons' Home for the Aged 

in Norfolk County Massachusetts, The . . 305,308 

Yarmouth 

12 Friday Club, The 9,159 

13 South Yarmouth Woman's Club, Inc. ... 360 

Headquarters Outside of Commonwealth 

14 Albanian- American School of Agriculture, New 

York, N. Y 78,661 

15 American Association of Medical Social Workers, 

Chicago, 111. . . ._ . . . . 4,238 

16 American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, New 

York, N. Y. . . . . . . 9,915,871 

17 American Baptist Home Mission Soc'y, The, New 

York, N. Y 18,466,914 

18 American Peace Societv. Washington, D. C. . 5,133 

19 Boys' dubs of America, Inc., New York, N. Y. 176,246 

20 Council for the Clinical Training of Theological 

Students, Inc., New York, N. Y.3 . . . 292 

21 Millennium Guild, The, New York, N. Y. . . 1,106 

22 Sofia American Schools, Inc., New York, N. Y. . 805,790 

23 Woman's American Baptist Foreign Mission 

Society, New York, N. Y 2,711,418 

Totals $391,924,445 

— None. l Not stated. 2 Restricted to capital. 3 Name changed to Council for Clinical Training, I 
t 



56 
158 


200 
61 


25/ 
] 


1,642 


. — 


_. 


18,935 


582 


3;- 


562,476 


11,615 


303,99£ 


161,608 

5,749 
144,185 


11,716 

577 

5,173 


643,753 
4,34S 


4,509 

528 

3,449 


280 
166,214 


8 
18,243 


271,951 


14,414 


32,23S 



$22,441,370 $28,619,665 



',523,072 



: 


II. 


















133 


:i' 


writable 


Corporations — - Concluded. 




















Paid 


Service or Relief Given To 




8 














•: 




Current 


Current 


Salaries 


Officers 






Families 








:: 


Pgacies 


Receipts 


Expendi- 


and 


and 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Member- 


Organi- 




: 






tures 


Wages 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 


ship 


zations 




__ 
















viduals 








- 





$3,934 


$3,705 


$2,477 


2 





_ 




1 


■ 


,!,8832 

i,0002] 
,.,224 j 


24,539 


24,663 


16,719 


26 


— 


— 1.949 


— 


2 


:■ 


16,024 


15,334 


5,135 


3 


— 


— 1,675 


— 


3 




,.,3342 


142,322 


162,190 


61,698 


110 


2,660 


81 — — 


_ 


4 




i, 67121 
.{,200 J 


246 


245 


— 


— 


68 


68 — — 


3 


5 




99,390 


98,041 


82,289 


58 


78,5404 


56,2744 — ' 


3 


6 







7,273 


6,623 


401 


3 





215 — 




7 




— 


16,678 . 


14,117 


2,820 


3 


— 


— — — 


30 


8 




— 


255,587 


258,934 


129,121 


138 


— 


— 6,465 


— 


9 




5,0002 


133,828 


133,798 


71,054 


63 


— 


— 1.660 


~ 


10 




— 


12,469 


15,114 


5,590 


7 


23 


— — — 


— 


11 




_ 


514 


429 


48 


1 




10 


11 


12 






221 


220 








— — 


3 


13 




5,500 


7,142 


7,099 


25 


1 


— 


— 


1 


14 







19,552 


20,206 


7,755 


4 








_ 


15 




1,4422) 
0,382 J 




















844,713 


859,036 


529,282 


365 


— 


— — — 


— 


16 




3,620 


821,385 


944,517 


1 


526 


l 


1 





17 




— 


6,327 


8,370 


5,624 


2 


— 


— — — 


— 


18 




3,000 


164,588 


156,722 


102,260 


30 


— 


326 


— 


19 




— 


4,789 


6,343 


3,806 


8 


60 


60 — 


15 


20 




— 


536 


194 


- — ■ 


— 


— 


— — — 


— 


21 




162 


188,504 


195,081 


88,734 


70 


512 


_ _ __ 


— 


22 




— 


319,828 


339,029 


21,863 


13 


— 


— — — 


— 


23 




501,1042) 
)88,553 J 




















$61,752,458 


$59,957,845 


$24,322,167 


28,513 . 


3,838,528a 


2,177,211b 71,205 409,518 


4,942 






/isits. 


















Total includes: 1,422,845 individuals; 889,123 visits 


438,977 


attendance; 31,236 census 


1,056,347 




anin 


lals. 
















Total incl 


udes: 534,812 individuals; 389,277 visits; 243,171 attendance; 18,204 census; 991,747 animal 


s. 



134 P.D. 17. 

Part III 

CITY AND TOWN INFIRMARIES 

G. Frank McDonald, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries 

Laws Relating to Infirmaries 

(General Lazvs, Chapter 47, Tercentenary Edition) 

For the information of boards of public welfare, superintendents of infirmaries 
and others concerned, certain laws relating to infirmaries are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually all city and 
town infirmaries, and to include in its annual report a statement of their condi- 
tion and management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative thereto. 
(General Laws, ch. 121, sect. 7.) 

The superintendent of every infirmary must keep a register, in the form pre- 
scribed by the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons re- 
ceived or committed, the cities or towns to which they belong, and the dates of 
their reception and discharge. (General Laws, ch. 48, sect. 8.) 

Every inmate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept diligently employed 
in labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is assigned, 
or if he is stubborn and disorderly, he shall be punished according to the orders 
and regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, ch. 117, sects. 21 
and 22. See also opinion of Attorney General given to State Board of Charity, 
November 21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town infirmary 
for a period of more than two months are : ( 1 ) those whose physical condition 
is such as to make such action necessary or desirable; and (2) those who are un- 
der three years of age, with mothers who are infirmary inmates and suitable per- 
sons to aid in taking care of them. (General Laws, ch. 47, sect. 11.) In cases 
of failure of boards of public welfare to remove children illegally in infirmaries, 
the Department of Public Welfare is required to remove them and provide for 
them otherwise, at the expense of the city or town concerned. (General Laws, 
ch. 117, sects, 36 and 37.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, if physically able, shall perform 
labor of some kind, and shall be lodged under conditions prescribed by the State 
Department of Public Health. (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to advise with and assist lo- 
cal boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for infirmary buildings. 
(General Laws, ch. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Infirmaries 

As required by law, every infirmary has been visited once by the department's 
inspector. Five have been visited twice, and two have been visited three times.. 
Conferences have been held with various municipal officers — mayors of cities, lo- 
cal boards of public welfare, and special committees and architects — concerning 
matters of importance relative to the management and administration of infirma- 
ries, or for the discussion of improvements or new construction. There are in 
Massachusetts 110 infirmaries which cared for 10,274 inmates during the past 
municipal year. 

Infirmaries Closed 

The infirmary at Holliston was closed during the past year. It has been noted 
that where some towns are improving their infirmaries by additions and more 
acreage, other towns of the same size are disposing of and making arrangements 
for the care of their poor. The infirmary is of vital concern to a town, and good 
judgment must be observed in such matters. 

Recommendations 

Modern concepts in public welfare impose upon the Commonwealth the re- 
quirement that the aged poor and infirm be properly and humanely supported. 



Pt. III. 135 

3f the various methods employed to meet this problem, it appears that institu- 
ional life under high standards and skilled supervision offers the most complete, 
nost economical, and satisfactory form of relief and assistance yet devised. Pri- 
vate charitable, fraternal, and religious organizations have recognized this fact 
ind have made great advances under the institutional system. 

Despite the example of these organizations, city and town infirmaries have 
shown but little advance. Even today many old-style poor houses are still being 
Dperated. The practice of following precedent, and laxity in not keeping apace 
with advanced thought in this vital matter, demand immediate action. 

The department views with approval those infirmaries where hospital sections 
ire established. At Lawrence, in particular, a modern hospital is attached to the 
infirmary and called the Burke Memorial Hospital. It also operates a pharmacy 
for the compounding and dispensing of drugs — certainly an arrangement that is 
economically sound. The department recommends that cities and towns should 
immediately determine deficiencies in their infirmaries and should effect remedial 
measures. Listed below are suggestions for a systematic survey to accomplish 
this purpose. 

1. Administration 

a. Adequate personnel 

b. Register of inmates 

c. Observation of officials for general ability and kindliness towards the 
inmates 

.2. Social and Mental Conditions 

a. Observation for mental attitude 

b. Interviews with inmates and complaints 

c. Inquiry for personal problems 

d. Freedom of religious pursuits 

e. Availability of religious services 

f. Encouragement of visiting 

g. Radio and reading material 

I Health 

a. Heating 

b. Ventilation 

c. Lighting 

d. Cheerful sleeping quarters 

e. Pleasant dining rooms 

f. Medical attention 

g. First aid supplies 

h. Examination of eyes and teeth for defects 
i. Seasonable clothing and bed coverings 
j. Recreation facilities 

4. Sanitary Conditions 

a. Vermin 

b. Drinking water source and supply 

c. Water closets and plumbing 

d. Bath facilities 

e. Cleanliness of kitchen 

f. Food storage 

g. Garbage disposal 

h. Laundry equipment 

i. Adequate cleaning equipment 

j. Condition of floors, walls, and ceilings 

: 5. Buildings 

a. Structural condition 

b. Fire protection 

c. Wiring for electric fixtures 

d. Egress 

e. Accident safety 

f. Paint and outside condition 



136 



P.D. 17 






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Pt. III. 



139 



§1a 



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140 p.d. 1: 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF 

Numbers Relieved 



The following information covers public relief whether rendered in institu 
tions or outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether state or local 
The total number of ^persons aided appears in Table I, alone. Of this total th 
number of those aide'd by reason of unemployment is omitted in all the following 
tables. The tables analyze by age, sex, and nativity, the number of persons re 
lieved, except those aided by reason of unemployment, and the tabulations an 
concluded by figures for cost of all relief. 

A complete analysis of the data in regard to individuals aided by reason of un 
employment is omitted for the following reasons : It has seemed to us unwise tc 
require each year that cities and towns send us the names and social statistics o: 
all persons aided because of unemployment. A sufficient indication of the factsj 
about this group is contained in the Annual Report for the year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1932. Since that time the burden upon cities and towns and upon thi 
department in collecting -and tabulating these statistics has become so heavy thai 
it creates an unjustifiable expense to attempt to analyze each family every year 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the several cities and towm 
during the year beginning April 1, 1938, and ending March 31, 1939. All per 
sons are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving aid in 
any form, exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers was 661,587. Of this number 
434,119 were aided on account of unemployment, mostly in their own homes. 
The remainder, 227,468, were aided as follows : — 21,404 in institutions, and 75,- 
647 outside, either in private families or in their own homes. Of the persons 
aided in institutions, 9,403 were relieved in the various city and town infirmaries 
leaving 12,001 who were cared for in other institutions. It should be noted that 
certain cities which have city hospitals have not reported persons aided therein 
under "poor relief." Of the outside aid, 7,526 cases were aided in private famil- 
ies other than their own, while 68,121 were reported as having been aided in their 
own homes. This last figure comprises practically all city and town aid usually 
known as local public out-door relief, except 44,379 Aid to Dependent Children 
recipients and 86,038 Old Age Assistance recipients. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the Common 
wealth as shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly 
by the Commonwealth, this table includes also those cases included in Table I 
in which the relief has been rendered by the several cities and towns in the first 
instance and those cities and towns have been reimbursed by the Commonwealth 
as required by law. This table shows 32,597 aided by the Commonwealth. Of 
this number, the aid in 27,654 cases was first rendered by the several cities and 
towns. The remaining 4,943 cases were aided by the Commonwealth; 4,467 of 
them at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary; 12 in the Infirmary Ward 
at the State Farm ; and 464 at the Massachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of the population in the de 
pendent group during the year under analysis. As previously explained, it 
should be remembered that persons aided by reason of unemployment are ex 
eluded from this table and the following tables. The persons who passed out of 
care during the year number 52,529. Those in this total released by death num- 
ber 8,078 and 4,530 persons were transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, 
the Commonwealth had 174,939 persons in receipt of relief. 

Table IV begins classification of the number of persons aided except those 
aided by reason of unemployment, and shows the analysis by color, nativity, and 
sex. Of the 227,468 persons so aided, 104,226 were males and 123,242 females. 
The native-born whites — 157,707 — number slightly more than twice the foreign 
born of the white races. 

Table V gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 



Pt. III. 141 

The parents of 71,810 were both native; 51,865 were children of foreign-born 
parents : 28,670 were parents one of whom was foreign-born or unknown ; while 
the nativity of parents in 9,445 cases remained unascertained. It appears, there- 
fore, that of the 227,468 persons receiving aid during the year, there were at 
least 116,632 who were either foreign-born or were of the first generation in our 
citizenship. 

By Table VI it appears that of the 227,468 persons analyzed, 7,416 were un- 
der five years of age; 43,261 were under fifteen; 62,832 or 27 per cent including 
the above were under twenty; 54,429 or 24 per cent, were between twenty and 
sixty; and 108,573 or 48 per cent, were over that age. The ages of 1,634 were 
unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved there is always a considerable number of 
mental defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed and 
are therefore not cared for in the special institutions such as the mental hospitals, 
maintained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to be noted further that 
since no court has passed upon their mental condition, their classification here is 
made only because, in the opinion of the respective authorities making the re- 
turns, there is no doubt of their defect. Table VII affords a rough classification 
into three groups, according to the nature of the defect, and a division by sex. 
The total number thus cared for was 211, namely 125 males and 86 females. One 
hundred eighty-six (186) of these cases were relieved by cities and towns; the 
remaining 25, having no settlement, were aided at the expense of the Common- 
wealth. Seventy-five' (75) of the whole number were classed as "insane" mostly 
the senile and mildly insane to be found in the infirmaries. This total includes 
52 males and 23 females. Ninety-two (92) were called "idiotic," namely 46 
males and 46 females. The epileptics totaled 44, of whom 27 were males and 17 
were females. 

Table VIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and nature of discharge 
from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. Of the 52,- 
529 cases so dismissed, 27,039 were males and 25,490 were females. Twenty- 
four and seven-tenths (24.7) per cent, or 12,973, were released to the care of 
relatives or friends. Eight and six-tenths (8.6) per cent or 4,530 of the whole 
number were transferred to other institutions, while 51.3 per cent of the aggre- 
gate were discharged without relatives or friends or other authorities agreeing 
to look after them. The great majority in this last group were persons assisted 
through illness, after which they became self-supporting again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign born who were receiving public relief 
during the year number 64,767 or 28 per cent of the entire number of persons 
analyzed. This percentage is 3.2 per cent more than the proportion of foreign 
born in the poulation generally, — 24.8 per cent. Canada furnished 21,321 of this 
number; England and Wales, 7,038; Germany, 1,511; Ireland, 12,501; Italy, 
6,228; Russia and Poland, 5,136; Scandinavia, 2,591; Scotland, 1,466; and all 
other countries, 6,975. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes analyzed to the whole 
number. Thus, of the 227,466 person analyzed, 85.7 per cent were settled cases 
and 14.3 per cent were unsettled. As to the place in which relief was given, 9.45 
per cent of the total were aided in institutions, namely 4.14 per cent in infirmaries, 
2.17 per cent in state institutions and 3.14 per cent in other institutions, mostly 
under private management. Outdoor relief, designated as aid "outside," was given 
in 90.55 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, namely, 72.03 per cent, were 
relieved in their own homes. Aid was given in private families other than the 
recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 18.52 per cent instances. Percentages 
of age show that 28.70 per cent were minors, 22.85 per cent were between the 
ages of twenty-one and sixty, and 47.73 per cent were sixty or over. The ages 
of 0.72 per cent were unknown. As to sex, males rated 45.82 per cent and fe- 
males 54.18 per cent. The number of colored persons was very small, totaling 
only 2.01 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification [n the care of defectives, the per- 
centage of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor relief cases is 



142 P.D. 17. 

exceedingly small, and tends always to decrease. The mental condition of all 
the cases analyzed shows that 99.91 per cent were sane, 0.03 per cent were in- 
sane, 0.04 per cent were idiotic and 0.02 per cent were epileptic. 

It is of further interest to view at a glance the numerical relation to the whole 
population of the persons relieved at public expense as analyzed in Table XI, 
which exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the population of 
the Commonwealth on a basis of the census of 1935. Thus it is shown that in 
each thousand of the population there were 52.29 indigent persons relieved at 
public expense. Of these, 23.96 were males and 28.33 were females. The native- 
born numbered 37.19 in the thousand; foreign born, 14.89; native born of foreign 
parentage, 11.92; and those of unknown nativity, 0.21. The proportion of va- 
grants reported was 4.97 in the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief 

The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within 
their respective fiscal years are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified 
as "ordinary", or maintenance, and "extraordinary," or special. Together with 
the ordinary outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the 
difference set out under "net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay is 
classified as expenses in institutions and outside. The subdivision follows the 
classification in Table I regarding the nature and place of aid. The grand total 
in Table XII shows that an aggregate of $64,785,970.38 was laid out by the sev- 
eral cities and towns. Of this sum, $64,741,305.14 was ordinary outlay, or 
maintenance, an increase of $10,242,741.27 over last year; the remainder, or 
$44,665.24 was expended for sundry improvements at the city and town infirma- 
ries. Of the money expended for maintenance, $2,480,429.04 was expended for 
infirmary care and $1,544,596.71 for relief in other institutions. Care in private 
families took $793,171.30 and relief in the recipients' own homes, i. e., outdoor 
poor relief, totaled $25,182,973.72. The sum of $25,326,735.27 was expended 
for Old Age Assistance, an increase of $4,892,748.43 over 1938. The figure for 
outdoor relief shows an increase of $3,401,726.33 over the previous year. The 
sum of $6,528,549.64 was expended for Aid to Dependent Children. This ex- 
penditure shows an increase of $1,844,304.70. The cost of administration, in- 
cluding salary and office expenses of the local public welfare boards, came to 
$2,884,849.46. The total receipts on account of ordinary expenditures were $29,- 
572,815.30 — classified as receipts on account of infirmaries, $226,480.32, and all 
other, $29,346,334.98. Subtracting receipts leaves $35,168,489.84 as the net 
ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is carried 
out for cases aided out of the state funds. Of the $20,328,451.31 expended for 
this purpose, $20,247,346.01 was on account of ordinary expenditures, laid out as 
follows : at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary, $841,021.96 ; at the State 
Farm, $368.11, at the Massachusetts Hospital School, $142,807.18; and all other 
expenditures outside of institutions, $19,263,148.76. Extraordinary expenditures 
totaled $81,105.30, all expended for special improvements at the several institu- 
tions just enumerated. Inasmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expendi- 
tures to the separate individuals receiving the aid, the figures set out under the 
state tables of cost are arrived at by taking from net cost of maintenance that 
proportion which the average number relieved in the institution bears to the 
average inmate population of the institution. 

In Table XIV state and local outlays are added, showing that of the $55,542,- 
194.56 expended for public poor relief, $55,416,424.02 was for ordinary outlays, 
of which $4,689,529.26 went for institutional relief and $47,842,045.30 was for 
relief outside. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $125,770.54. 



" 



t. III. 






















143 


'able I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year 


ending 


March 31, 1939 
















On 

Account 






For All Other 


Reasons 




















CITIES AND 


Aggregate 


of 






In 






Aid to 




TOWNS 




Unem- 




Inln- 


Other 


In 


In 


Depend- 


Old Age 






ployment 


Total 


lrmaries 


Insti- 


Private 


Own 


ent 


Assist- 












tutions 


Families 


Homes 


Children 


ance 


1- 

\bmgton 


1,177 


858 


319 


5 





6 


45 


23 


240 


Acton . 






222 


67 


155 


— 


— 


— 


39 


27 


89 


\cushnet 






485 


316 


169 


— 


5 


10 


22 


41 


91 


.Warns . 






1,576 


1,001 


575 


25 


— 


16 


96 


171 


267 


Agawam 






726 


493 


233 


— 


1 


— 


55 


46 


131 


Alford . 






27 


— 


27 


— 


3 


1 


8 


— 


15 


Amesbury . 






2,688 


2,196 


492 


27 


— 


6 


25 


74 


360 


Amherst 






469 


147 


322 


— 


4 


3 


126 


58 


131 


Andover 






985 


682 


303 


12 


4 


7 


13 


76 


191 


Arlington 






2,079 


1,158 


921 


— 


— 


39 


250 


218 


414 


Ashburnham 


L 




353 


143 


210 


2 


3 


21 


103 


22 


59 


Ashby . 






86 


33 


53 


— 


— 


— 


19 


9 


25 


Ashfield 






29 


— 


29 


— 


— 


— 


4 


3 


22 


Ashland 






232 


125 


107 


— 


2 


3 


25 


19 


58 


Athol . 






1,763 


908 


855 


21 


9 


3 


555 


' 28 


239 


Attleboro 






2,228 


1,290 


938 


20 


1 


45 


98 


268 


506 


Auburnl 






922 


684 


238 


3 


— 


4 


31 


49 


151 


Avon 






308 


178 


130 


— 


1 


2 


13 


32 


82 


Ayer 






298 


143 


155 


9 


— 


4 


14 


33 


95 


'.Barnstable . 






1,470 


957 


513 


14 


6 


40 


153 


82 


218 


iBarre 






590 


472 


118 


16 


— 


— 


36 


9 


57 


iBecket . 






114 


33 


81 


— 


— 


9 


40 


3 


29 


(Bedford 






230 


95 


135 


— 


2 


1 


64 


14 


54 


IBelchertown 






245 


132 


113 


— 


1 


1 


22 


13 


76 


IBellingham . 






663 


513 


150 


— 


2 


3 


30 


33 


82 


iBelmont 






854 


339 


515 


— 


4 


35 


269 


43 


164 


IBerkley 






151 


34 


117 


— 


— 


— 


48 


19 


50 


iBerlinl 






90 


39 


51 


— 


4 


3 


2 


6 


36 


iBernardston 






62 


20 


42 


— 


— 


3 


13 


3 


23 


(Beverly 






4,095 


3,063 


1,032 


53 


7 


28 


146 


357 


441 


iBillerica 






1,253 


910 


343 


5 


— 


9 


72 


43 


214 


^Blackstone . 






1,149 


946 


203 


— 


— 


4 


36 


56 


107 


(Blandford . 






42 


21 


21 


— 


— 


1 


— 


5 


15 


'.Bolton . 






88 


24 


64 


— 


— 


1 


18 


11 


34 


(Boston . 






129,040 


85,773 


43,267 


2,573 


130 


3,833 


8,185 


14,477 


14,069 


IB'ourne . 






561 


190 


371 


— 


2 


5 


186 


56 


122 


iBoxboro 






28 


— 


28 


— 


— 


— 


13 


10 


5 


•Boxford 






63 


14 


49 


— 


— 


1 


21 


8 


19 


iBoylston 1 
'Braintree 






151 
1,750 


105 

288 


46 
1,462 


18 


8 


3 
14 


8 
915 


3 
148 


32 
359 


'Brewster 






134 


31 


103 


— 


— 


7 


45 


13 


38 


Bridgewater 

Brimfield 

Brockton 






897 

150 

11,160 


553 

61 

5,502 


344 

89 

5,658 


5 
194 


22 


13 

27 


91 

50 

2,717 


89 

6 

569 


146 

33 
2,129 


■Brookfield 






133 


59 


74 


1 


8 


2 


15 


3 


45 


'Brookline 






3,145 


1,869 


1,276 


29 


7 


141 


279 


216 


604 


•Buckland 






157 


63 


94 


— 


— 


5 


19 


15 


55 


Burlington 
Cambridge 
Canton 






347 

20,829 

726 


125 

14,315 

424 


222 

6,514 

302 


178 


1 
1,242 


101 
2 


129 

2,324 

87 


21 

1,213 

109 


71 

1,456 

104 


Carlisle 






43 


— 


43 


— 


1 


— 


17 


6 


19 


Carver . 






241 


170 


71 


— 


1 


3 


17 


11 


39 


Charlemont 






148 


38 


110 


— 


— 


7 


56 


— 


47 


Charlton* 






525 


408 


117 


4 


— 


6 


25 


10 


72 


Chatham 






135 


33 


102 


— 


— 


2 


7 


16 


77 


Chelmsford 






1,045 


749 


296 


10 


4 


8 


31 


33 


210 


Chelsea 






10,659 


7,987 


2,672 


— 


230 


— 


1,240 


659 


543 


1 Cheshire 






242 


184 


58 


— 


— 


7 


— 


5 


. 46 


(Chester 






243 


78 


165 


— 


— 


1 


91 


30 


43 


(Chesterfield 






41 


— 


41 


— 


— 


3 


10 


3 


25 


(Chicopee 






12,105 


10,230 


1,875 


114 


2 


— 


461 


758 


540 


(Chilmark 






19 


— 


19 


— 


— 


— 


4 


5 


10 


(Clarksburg 
(Clinton 






279 
3,391 


192 

2,788 


87 
603 


18 


_ 


5 
17 


15 
81 


15 
120 


52 
367 


(Cohasset 






479 


344 


135 


— 


1 


5 


54 


18 


57 


(Colrain 






209 


104 


105 


— 


3 


6 


7,7 


24 


35 


(Concord 
(Conway 
(Cummingtoi 
IDalton 


l 




456 

105 

78 

438 


221 
13 
30 

270 


235 
92 
48 

168 


9 


2 
1 

2 


10 
3 
2 

22 


93 
32 
10 
18 


43 
9 
8 

43 


80 
46 
27 
83 


IDanvers 
I Dartmouth 






729 
1,612 


244 
1,289 


485 
323 


13 


2 

3 


27 
8 


132 
60 


81 
39 


243 
200 


IDedham 
IDeerfield 
IDennis 
IDighton 






2,382 
260 
388 
438 


1,947 
145 
181 
297 


435 
115 
207 
141 


32 

1 


1 
3 
2 


29 
10 
9 
10 


7,7 
28 
68 
45 


89 
30 
20 
33 


248 
46 
106 

51 



i Charlton Home Farm Association. 



144 


















P.D. 1 


Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported 


or Relieved during the Year endni ? 




March 31, 1939— Continued 








i 






On 






For All Other 


Reasons 


! 

1 






Account 
















CITIES AND 


Aggregate 


of 






In 






Aid to 




TOWNS 




Unem- 




In In- 


Other 


In 


In 


Depend- 


Old Ag' 






ployment 


Total 


firmaries Insti- 


Private 


Own 


ent 


Assist! 












tutions 


Families 


Homes 


Children 


ance i . 


Douglas 


504 


397 


107 






6 


21 


29 


51i 


Dover . 




27 


4 


23 


— 


— 


1 


7 


— 


15: 


Dracut . 




1,129 


882 


247 


3 


— 


11 


21 


44 


1681 


Dudley . 




611 


404 


207 


3 


2 


1 


98 


49 


54 1 


Dunstable . 




26 


— 


26 


— 


1 


1 


13 


2 


9 


Duxbury 




313 


139 


174 


6 


— 


3 


58 


20 


87 


East Bridgewater 


740 


437 


303 


— 


— 


7 


129 


49 


118 


East Brookfieldi 


209 


83 


126 


— 


— 


5 


89 


— 


32 


East Longmeadow . 


290 


57 


233 


— 


2 


2 


144 


8 


77 


Eastham 


92 


24 


68 


— 


— 


— 


40 


4 


24 


Easthampton 




1,711 


1,331 


380 


26 


2 


6 


22 


150 


174 


Easton 




741* 


— 


741 


9 


4 


8 


505 


31 


184 


Edgartown . 




170 


26 


144 


— 


4 


2 


59 


26 


53 


Egremont 




32 


— 


32 


— 


2 


— 


2 


4 


24 


Erving . 




137 


26 


111 


— 


1 


11 


70 


— 


29 


Essex . 




143 


36 


107 


— 


6 


1 


31 


8 


61 


Everett 




9,903 


6,940 


2,963 


— 


141 


4 


1,458 


584, 


776 


Fairhaven . 




1,799 


1,263 


536 


13 


— 


11 


154 


102 


256 


Fall River . 




26,402 


20,978 


5,424 


407 


265 


— 


1,082 


1,379 


2,291 fl 


Falmouth 




1,340 


814 


526 


8 


— 


9 


294 


94 


121 


Fitchburg . 




7,097 


646 


6,451 


89 


214 


35 


5,119 


434 


560 


Florida 




30 


17 


13 


— 


— 


1 


2 


— 


10 


Foxboro 




500 


201 


299 


— 


3 


14 


90 


36 


156 1 


Framingham 




2,915 


1,978 


937 


— 


4 


19 


231 


228 


455 


Franklin 




1,089 


634 


455 


.20 


1 


18 


156 


106 


154 


Freetown 




204 


98 


106 


— 


— 


1 


31 


9 


65 


Gardner 




3,124 


1,143 


1,981 


51 


12 


23 


1,530 


105 


260 A 


Gay Head . 




9 


— 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


Georgetown 




206 


71 


135 


— 


1 


— 


10 


19 


105 1 


Gill 




63 


— 


63 


— 


— 


— 


47 


— 


16 


Gloucester . 




3,237 


1,756 


1,481 


72 


— 


— 


555 


164 


690 1 


Goshen 




22 


3 


19 


— 


— 


1 


8 


— 


10 


Gosnold 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Grafton 




1,016 


780 


236 


1 


1 


11 


20 


53 


150 j! 


Granby 




49 


— 


49 


1 


1 


4 


25 


— 


18 


Granville 




49 


25 


24 


— 


— 


3 


4 


4 


13 1 


Great Barringto 


ti 


768 


400 


368 


— 


11 


29 


98 


32 


198 1 


Greenfield . 




1,847 


402 


1,445 


34 


1 


— 


932 


105 


373 ' 


Groton . 




253 


157 


96 


— 


2 


4 


10 


11 


69 I 


Groveland . 




309 


153 


156 


— 


2 


5 


27 


13 


109 1 


Hadley 




136 


— 


136 


1 — 


— 


2 


94 


18 


22 V 


Halifax 




166 


32 


134 


— 


— 


— 


76 


19 


39 , 


Hamilton 




343 


159 


184 


2 


5 


— 


125 


5 


47 1 


Hampden 




74 


1 


73 


— 


— 


6 


33 


3 


31 1 


Hancock 




54 


24 


30 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


26 1 


Hanover 




492 


301 


191 


— 


— 


5 


54 


18 


114 


Hanson 




385 


192 


193 


5 


— 


1 


59 


16 


112 


Hardwick 1 . 




327 


136 


191 


6 


1 


— 


114 


26 


44 J 


Harvard 




48 


1 


47 


— 


2 


1 


8 


11 


25 


Harwich 




489 


169 


320 


3 


— 


10 


175 


30 


102 


Hatfield 




91 


21 


70 


— 


— 


2 


24 


4 


40 


Haverhill 




12,775 


7,008 


5,767 


207 


1,705 


— 


1,552 


737 


1,566 


Hawley 




30 


— 


30 


— 


— 


— 


2 


9 


19 | 


Heath . 




52 


31 


21 


— 


— 


1 


2 


— 


18 i 


Hingham 




569 


112 


457 


13 


5 


3 


253 


46 


137 , 


Hinsdale 




293 


205 


88 


— 


— 


2 


37 


7 


42 


Holbrook 




361 


130 


231 


— 


— 


2 


31 


48 


150 


Holdeni 




444 


303 


141 


1 


1 


1 


34 


30 


74 


Hollandl . 




14 


— 


14 


— 


— 


— 


4 


3 


7 


Holliston 




425 


246 


179 


1 


1 


3 


51 


14 


109 


Holyoke 




8,167 


6,468 


1,699 


289 


1 


11 


343 


343 


712 


Hopedale 




116 


32 


84 


— 


— 


4 


18 


22 


40 


Hopkinton . 




332 


132 


200 


— 


2 


11' 


36 


33 


118 


Hubbardstonl 




130 


48 


82 


— 


2 


1 


14 


26 


39 


Hudson 




1,456 


940 


516 


15 


— 


— 


221 


70 


210 


Hull 




440 


269 


171 


— 


3 


5 


75 


22 


66 


Huntington 

Ipswich 

Kingston 




132 

1,026 
307 


15 
133 


117 

1,026 

174 


11 


7 
2 


6 
4 
4 


55 

838 

55 


13 

57 
21 


43 
109 
92 


Lakeville 




147 


66 


81 


— 


— 


1 


8 


2 


70 


Lancaster . 




398 


201 


197 


3 


— 


2 


80 


25 


87 


Lanesboro 




201 


154 


47 


— 


1 


1 


4 


5 


36 


Lawrence 




12,737 


9,075 


3,662 


786 


— 


— 


630 


519 


1,727 


Lee 




411 


189 


222 


— 


1 


8 


91 


25 


97 


Leicester* 




863 


595 


268 


6 


14 


4 


100 


65 


79 


Lenox . 




210 


30 


180 








125 


9 


46 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Included in total. 



III. 

iBle I.— Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the 

March 31, 1939— Continued. 



145 
Year ending 



CITIES AND 
TOWNS 



iominster 
teverett 
Lexington 
ileyden 
lincoln 
Ettleton 
fongmeadcn 
lowell . 
ludlow 
lunenburg 

Jynnfield 

.falden 

Manchester 

Mansfield 

darbleheacl 

flarion 

farlboro 

;|arshfield 

fashpee 

Jjattapoiset 

faynard 

fedfield 

fedford 

fedway 

jelrose 

fendon 

lerrimac 

lethuen 

liddleboro 

(iddlefield 

[iddleton 

[ilford 

ifillburyi 

lillis . 

■ttville 

lilton . 

iOnroe 

!onson 

iontague 

Monterey 

iontgome 

1 Wash 

ahant 

antucket 

Stick . 

eedham 

ew Ashford 

sw Bedford 

m Braintree 1 

ew Marlboro 

ew Salem . 

ewbury 

ewburyport 

ewton 

Drfolk 

orth Adams 

orth Andover 

r>rth Attleboro 

orth Brookfield 

>rth Readin 

irthampton 
nrthboro . 
nrthbridge 
nrthfield 

rton . 
rrwell 

rwood 
kk Bluffs 
kkhaml 

ange 
(leans 

m 

fford 

timer . 
xxtonl 



gto: 



Aggregate 



4,132 

68 

966 

18 

88 

78 

96 

19,222 

1,125 

229 

24,163 

213 

8,528 

255 

878 

820 

448 

2,194 

302 

157 

263 

1,236 

198 

7,993 

430 

1,134 

119 

597 

4,120 

1,067 

8 

277 

1,983 

1,536 

230 

625 

572 

25 

472 

1,480 

37 

4 

178 

656 

1,344 

672 

11 

23,882 

14 

121 

85 

222 

2,395 

5,429 

109 

3,574 

1,179 

1,008 

317 

324 

3,326 

274 

2,045 

186 

272 

217 

916 

467 

14 

776 

156 

30 

1,216 

1,541 

44 



On 

Account 

of 
Unem- 
ployment 



3,116 

8 

576 

33 
10 

13,020 

769 

103 

18,724 

93 

6,347 

166 

324 

386 

354 

1,563 

163 

115 

73 

1,078 

45 

5,963 

258 

487 

166 

3,343 

474 

134 
1,239 
1,140 
119 
499 
264 

191 

890 

5 



99 

496 

643 

341 

9 

18,564 

23 

14 

119 

1,476 

3,660 

36 

2,455 

892 

625 

124 

207 

1,795 

56 

503 

32 

45 

112 

596 

313 

510 
73 

755 
1,244 



For All Other Reasons 



Total 



1,016 

60 

390 

18 

55 

68 

96 

6,202 

356 

126 

5,439 

120 

2,181 

89 

554 

434 

94 

631 

139 

42 

190 

158 

153 

2,030 

172 

647 

119 

431 

777 

593 

8 

143 

744 

396 

111 

126 

308 

25 

281 

590 

32 

4 

79 

160 

701 

331 

2 

5,318 

14 

98 

71 

103 

919 

1,769 

73 

1,119 

287 

383 

193 

117 

1,531 

218 

1,542 

154 

227 

105 

320 

154 

14 

266 

83 

30 

461 

297 

44 



In 
In In- Other 
firmaries Insti- 
tutions 



In In 

Private Own 
Families Homes 



719 



178 

113 
3 
16 

14 

22 
9 



355 



5 
1 
7 
1 

3 

1 

338 



2 
32 
14 

143 

2 
6 
2 
7 
3 
3 
8 
2 
6 
1 
4 
7 
9 
49 
14 
4 

29 
8 

6 

1 
1 



191 
18 

159 
5 
11 
28 
51 
1,463 

117 

31 

1,681 

63 

457 
23 

321 
65 
10 
73 
27 

100 
12 
71 

604 
24 

111 
68 

267 

56 

62 

2 

68 

110 

178 
23 
35 
34 
8 
85 

304 
11 



20 
1 

96 

77 

486 
3 
43 
32 
26 

204 

545 
6 

257 
14 
38 
95 
21 

853 

121 

1,228 

63 

121 
23 
32 
31 

42 

19 

6 

220 

33 



Aid to 




Depend- 


Old Age 


ent 


Assist- 


Children 


ance 


200 


513 


10 


31 


48 


132 


— 


11 


14 


30 


13 


22 


— 


40 


1,144 


2,505 


118 


92 


11 


71 


737 


2,820 


2 


51 


379 


1,123 


14 


45 


62 


127 


67 


284 


19 


57 


93 


418 


17 


85 


17 


24 


11 


70 


28 


109 


16 


58 


334 


1,013 


33 


108 


133 


394 


12 


38 


13 


133 


216 


455 


94 


382 


— 


5 


3 


64 


257 


325 


68 


128 


41 


43 


28 


54 


66 


183 


8 


6 


61 


112 


84 


166 


4 


16 



6 

55 

227 

84 

1,102 

12 

1 

16 

137 

550 
22 

214 
47 
75 
18 
16 

162 
11 
88 
11 
31 
10 

145 

38 

3 

33 

9 

56 
78 



51 

94 

332 

146 

2 

3,151 

11 

39 

30 

59 

512 

624 

41 

568 

212 

236 

62 

75 

421 

77 

124 

66 

71 

72 

103 

72 

10 

185 

53 

23 

137 

147 

9 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



146 




















! 

P.D. 1 




Table I. — A 7 umber of Poo 


r Persons Supported 


or Relieved during the Year endiv. 






March 


31 } 1939— Continued 
















On 






For All Other 


Reasons 






CITIES AND 


Aggregate 


Account 
of 






In 






Aid to 






TOWNS 




Unem- 




In In- 


Other 


In 


In 


D'epend- 


Old Aj 








ployment 


Total 


firmaries Insti- 


Private 


Own 


. ent 


Assist! 














tutions 


Families 


Homes 


Children 


ance 




Peabody 


5,095 


4,269 


826 


106 




15 


95 


225 


385 




Pelham 






77' 


— 


77 


— 


5 


4 


48 


2 


18 




Pembroke . 






163 


65 


98 


— 


1 


3 


24 


— 


7C; 




Pepperell 






290 


50 


240 


— 


1 


— 


135 


18 


8e! 




Peru 






54 


44 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


7 




Petersham . 






87 


37 


50 


— 


— 


3 


20 


— 


27 




Phillipston . 






90 


42 


48 


— 


— 


4 


23 


6 


15' 




Pittsfield . 






3,757 


1,969 


1,788 


159 


17 


77 


290 


306 


93S 




Plainfield . 






. 18 


— 


18 


— 


— 


2 


1 


— 


15 




Plainville . 






112 


50 


62 


— 


— 


5 


6 


8 


43 




Plymouth 






1,954 


1,313 


641 


28 


— 


26 


126 


91 


37C 




Plympton 






105 


3 


102 


3 


— 


12 


56 


— 


31 




Princeton! . 






45 


13 


32 


— 


— 


— 


7 


8 


17 




Provincetown 






718 


417 


301 


10 


1 


3 


108 


57 


122 




Quincy 






6,055 


2,722 


3,333 


78 


243 


31 


1,295 


505 


1,181 




Randolph 






980 


626 


354 


13 


1 


11 


49 


51 


22S! 




Raynham 






246 


132 


114 


— 


1 


6 


29 


6 


72, 




Reading 






1,316 


843 


473 


— 


1 


10 


88 


134 


24(, 


e : 


Rehoboth . 






306 


189 


117 


— 


1 


4 


27 


30 


55 


Revere . 






3,714 


2,475 


1,239 


— 


5 


58 


194 


468 


5U 




Richmond . 






74 


48 


26 


— 


— 


— 


9 


4 


13 


t> 


Rochester . 






108 


24 


84 


— 


3 


2 


18 


23 


38 


f> 


Rockland 






1,468 


1,028 


440 


8 


1 


— 


23 


76 


?1 




Rockport 






515 


171 


344 


6 


1 


1 


147 


42 


l i\ 


Rowe 






51 


26 


25 


— 


1 


3 


— 


6 


1' 


ts 


Rowley 






271 


175 


96 


— 


— 


— 


4 


29 


62 


t: 


Royalston . 






157 


26 


131 


— 


— 


1 


82 


16 


31 


i- 


Russell 






154 


98 


56 


— 


4 


7 


22 


— 


21 


*• 


Rutland* 






150 


77 


73 


1 


2 


3 


36 


2 


2S 

9o;| 


!> 


Salem . 






8,438 


4,606 


3,832 


134 


436 


47 


1,865 


443 


t! 


Salisbury 






684 


554 


130 


— 


— 


3 


7 


— 


12( 


'• 


Sandisfield . 






50 


18 


32 


4 


1 


1 


13 


— 


i: 


t: 


Sandwich 






230 


125 


105 


— 


6 


3 


8 


20 


61 


ey 

h 
r 
ill 


Saugus . 






1,345 


126 


1,219 


20 


20 


38 


797 


58 


28e| 


Savoy . 






29 


7 


22 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 


15, 


Scituate 






466 


94 


372 


— 


1 


3 


217 


43 


m 


Seekonk 






629 


472 


157 


— 


2 


1 


30 


63 


61 


ill 
ill 


Sharon . 






336 


66 


270 


— 


— 


7 


190 


18 


5, c 


Sheffield 






280 


107 


173 


— 


11 


4 


82 


16 


6( 


:!:: 


Shelburne . 






141 


44 


97 


— 


1 


9 


16 


14 


5; 


ir.c 


Sherborn 






62 


24 


38 


— 


— 


1 


7 


5 


21 


IX 


Shirley 






211 


111 


100 


— 


3 


3 


27 


23 


4' 


.::: 


Shrewsbury 






789 


545 


244 


— 


— 


9 


103 


29 


102 


r.t 


Shutesbury 






31 


— 


31 


— 


2 


— 


16 


— 


12 


olv 


Somerset 






1,211 


985 


226 


9 


4 


2 


74 


37 


10C 1 


IK 


Somerville . 






16,563 


10,149 


6,414 


104 


972 


31 


2,763 


908 


1,6H 


li- 


South Hadley 






779 


360 


419 


7 


6 


— 


241 


48 


113 


ter 


Southampton 






68 


7 


61 


— 


— 


1 


26 


10 


2' 


J:r 


Southboro 






210 


126 


84 


— 


— 


2 


20 


2 


6( 




Southbridge 






1,633 


1,201 


432 


26 


10 


14 


133 


68 


183 


i 


Southwick . 






240 


175 


65 


— 


1 


— 


9 


17 


3l [ 


S: 


Spencer 






661 


337 


324 


20 


9 


10 


101 


37 


147 




Springfield . 






21,819 


17,656 


4,163 


224 


48 


103 


715 


350 


2,723 


A 


Sterling! 






166 


33 


133 


3 


5 


7 


47 


19 


Si 




Stockbridge 






381 


282 


99 


— 


1 


4 


48 


4 


42 


!q 


Stoneham 






1,129 


785 


344 


28 


2 


12 


26 


74 


202 


Stoughton . 






1,005 


391 


614 


7 


2 


25 


307 


71 


202 




Stow 






155 


78 


77 


— 


2 


1 


17 


16 


41 




Sturbridge . 






259 


48 


211 


7 


7 


9 


137 


— 


U 




Sudbury 






121 


55 


66 


— 


— 


3 


25 


— 


31 




Sunderland . 






105 


55 


50 


— 


3 


1 


18 


11 


i: 




Sutton . 






668 


477 


191 


5 


— 


4 


99 


27 


5( 




Swampscott 






654 


404 


250 


— 


5 


6 


15 


46 


174 




Swansea 
Taunton 






658 
6,939 


443 

5,350 


215 
1,589 


95 


1 
3 


8 


61 
61 


32 
598 


12: 

82' 




Templeton . 






804 


552 


252 


— 


— 


7 


68 


42 


133 




Tewksbury . 






515 


318 


197 


1 


8 


8 


77 


35 


6! 




Tisbury 






268 


97 


171 


— 


6 


4 


89 


19 


52 




Tolland 






2 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


' 




Topsfield . 
Townsend .' 






72 
242 


20 
62 


52 
180 


5 


2 


2 
6 


20 
67 


16 


2\ 
8 




Truro 






21 


6 


15 


— 


— 


1 


4 


— 


1( 




Tyngsboro . 






241 


73 


168 


— 


2 


— 


99 


17 


5( 




Tyringham . 






9 


— 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 




Upton . 






232 


115 


117 


7 


— 


— 


— 


20 


9( 




Uxbridge 






1,275 


640 


635 


26 




1 


456 


59 


92 




i Charlton Hoi 


ne I 


'a. 


rm Associa 


tion. 



















Pt. III. 






















147 


Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported 


or Relieved during the Year 


ending 




March 31, 1939— Concluded 














On 






For All Other 


Reasons 




CITIES AND 
TOWNS 


Aggregate 


Account 
of 






In 






Aid to 






Unem- 




In In- 


Other 


In 


In 


Depend- 


Old Age 






ployment 


Total 


firmaries Insti- 


Private 


Own 


ent 


Assist- 












tutions 


Families 


Homes 


Children 


ance 


Wakefield . 


1,502 


883 


619 


34 






159 


106 


320 


Wales . 






83 





83 











42 


5 


36 


Walpole 






365 


82 


283 





1 


6 


144 


37 


95 


Waltham 






4,328 


2,928 


1,400 


89 


11 




193 


298 


809 


Ware 






920 


571 


349 


11 








119 


63 


156 


Wareham 






1,550 


1,088 


462 


8 


1 


21 


93 


124 


215 


Warren* 






492 


313 


179 


11 


3 


7 


40 


26 


92 


Warwick 






78 


36 


42 


— 


5 


1 


20 




16 


Washington 






71 


42 


29 





5 


4 


7 




13 


Watertown 






3,303 


2,100 


1,203 


26 


34 


91 


393 


249 


410 


Wayland 






414 


283 


131 


— 


3 


7 


35 


14 


72 


Webster 






2,625 


2,066 


559 


44 


2 


37 


131 


130 


215 


Wellesley 






349 


68 


281 


— 


— 


13 


138 


43 


87 


Wellfleet 






100 




100 










33 


22 


45 


Wendell 






176 


21 


155 


— 





2 


122 




31 


Wenham 






108 


57 


51 


— 


1 


5 


19 


5 


21 


.'Vest Boylstonl 




139 


72 


67 


— 


— 





13 


5 


49 


West Bridgewater . 


450 


250 


200 


— 


— 


7 


94 


7 


92 


West Brookfieldl . 


149 


25 


124 


1 





7 


36 


8 


72 


West Newbury . 


160 


37 


123 


— 


— 




19 


8 


96 


West Springfield 


1,828 


1,386 


442 


— 


— 


39 


54 


67 


282 


West Stockbridge 


138 


63 


75 


— 


— 


— 


30 


8 


37 


West Tisbury . 


18 


5 


13 


— 


— 


— 


6 




7 


/Vestboro 




407 


35 


372 


12 


2 


6 


156 


51 


145 


Westfield . 




2,490 


1,909 


581 


40 


37 


6 


68 


111 


319 


/Vestford . 




384 


73 


311 


12 


4 


2 


172 


41 


80 


/Vesthampton 




52 


5 


47 


— 


5 


1 


24 




17 


Westminsterl 




126 


51 


75 


2 


4 


1 


24 


7 


37 


Weston 




429 


185 


244 


— 


10 


9 


190 


11 


24 


Westport 






496 


232 


264 


8 


17 


5 


49 


45 


140 


Westwood 






119 


38 


81 


— 


1 


9 


29 


6 


36 


Weymouth 






2,802 


1,670 


1,132 


13 


— 


20 


199 


257 


643 


Vhately 






65 


14 


51 


— 


5 


6 


17 


6 


17 


Yhitman 






1,218 


737 


481 


— 





11 


127 


69 


274 


'Vilbraham 






378 


68 


310 


— 


— 


20 


221 


16 


53 


Williamsburg 




348 


106 


242 


— 


— 


1 


155 


17 


69 


Tilliamstown 




619 


339 


280 


— 


1 


9 


95 


47 


128 


Wilmington 




622 


405 


217 


— 


4 


— 


31 


61 


121 


Yinchendon 




1,761 


974 


787 


29 


56 


27 


463 


38 


174 


Winchester . 




367 




367 


1 


1 


25 


176 


55 


109 


'Windsor 




46 


24 


22 


— 


4 


— 


4 





14 


Yinthrop 




974 


453 


521 


— 


39 


42 


136 


35 


269 


'/oburn 




1,699 


957 


742 


27 


— 


1 


112 


249 


353 


Worcester . 




31,378 


24,799 


6,579 


312 


18 


554 


837 


1,651 


3,207 


Worthington 




60 


10 


50 


: — 


1 


— 


15 


9 


25 


Vrentham . 




180 


98 


82 





— 





18 


6 


58 


aarmouth 




479 


338 


141 


— 


— 


5 


23 


42 


71 


Total 


656,644 


434,119 


222,525 


9,403 


7,058 


7,526 


68,121 


44,379 


86,038 


I State Institutions 
Aggregate . 


4,943 




4,943 


— 


4,943 


— 


— 


— 


— 


661,587 


434,119 


227,468 


9,403 


12,001 


7,526 


68,121 


44,379 


86,038 



11 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



148 „ P.D. 17. 

Table II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State in In- 
stitutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes, during the 
year ending March 31, 1939* 

Aggregate . 32,597 

In Institutions: 

Total 7,284 

State Infirmary 4,467 

Infirmary Ward, State Farm . . 12 

Massachusetts Hospital School 464 

Town or City Infirmary 520 

Other Institutions 1,821 

Outside: 

Total 25,313 

Private Families 5,584 

Own Homes 19,729 

Table III. — Movement during the Year ending March 31,. 1939, of the Poor 

Supported or Relieved* 

Number supported or relieved April 1, 1938 164,714 

Number admitted to support or relief during the year 62,754 

Total supported or relieved during the year ending March 31, 1939 . . 227,468 

Number discharged from aid during the year 52,529 

Died 8,078 

Discharged 39,921 

Transferred 4,530 

Number remaining April 1, 1939 174,939 

Table IV. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year 
ending March 31, 1939, classified by Color, Nativity and Sex* 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Aggregate 194,871 32,597 227,468 

Male 87,030 17,196 104,226 

Female 107,841 15,401 123,242 

White 191,002 31,894 222,896 

Native: 

Total 135,350 22,357 157,707 

Male 61,633 11,567 73,200 

Female 73,717 10,790 84,507 

Foreign: 

Total 55,031 9,255 64,286 

Male . 23,490 5,138 28,628 

Female ....... 31,541 4,117 35,658 

Unknown: 

Total 621 282 903 

Male 280 155 435 

Female . 341 127 468 

Colored i 3,869 703 4,572 

Native: 

Total 3,449 634 4,083 

Male . . - 1,462 295 1,757 

Female 1,987 339 2,326 

Foreign: 

Total 414 67 481 

Male 164 39 203 

Female rf 250 28 278 

Unknown: 

Total 6 2 8 

Male 1 2 3 

Female 5 5 

Table V. — Number of Native-born Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 
the Year ending March 31, 1939, classified by Parent Nativity* 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Total native born 138,799 22,991 161,790 

Parents: 

Native 61,052 10,758 71,810 

Foreign 45,691 6,174 51,865 

Mixed 24,569 4,101 28,670 

Unknown 7,487 1,958 9,445 

*Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment. 



Pt. III. 149 

Table VI. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year 
ending March 31, 1939, classified by Present Age* 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Aggregate 194,871 32,597 227,468 

Under 5 6,098 1,318 7,416 

5 to 9 12,758 2,379 15,137 

10 to 14 17,966 2,742 20,708 

15 to 19 17,007 2,564 19,571 

20 to 24 7,621 1,387 9,008 

25 to 29 4,676 1,095 5,771 

30 to 34 4,601 1,477 6,078 

35 to 39 5,255 1,578 6,833 

40 to 44 . 5,392 1,475 6,867 

45 to 49 5,294 1,501 6,795 

50 to 54 5,022 1,497 6,519 

55 to 59 - -. 5,045 1,513 6,558 

60 to 64 5,509 1,426 6,935 

65 to 69 24,773 2,964 27,737 

70 to 74 . ' 28,457 3,165 31,622 

75 to 79 21.266 2,321 23,587 

80 to 84 11,645 1,258 12,903 

85 to 89 4,030 463 4,493 

90 to 94 967 116 .1,083 

95 to 99 171 19 190 

100 and over 21 2 23 

Unknown 1,297 337 1,634 

Table VII. — Number of Mentally Impaired Persons Supported or Relieved as 

Poor Persons during the Year ending March 31, 1939, classified by 

Mental Defect and by Sex* 



Cities 

Source of Relief and 

Towns 

Aggregate 186 

Male 108 

Female 78 

Insane: 

Total 68 

Male 46 

Female 22 

Idiotic: 

Total 83 

Male 42 

Female 41 

Epileptic: 

Total 35 

Male 20 

Female 15 



State 



Total 



25 


211 


17 


125 


8 


86 


7 


75 


6 


52 


1 


23 


9 


92 


4 


46 


5 


46 


9 


44 


7 


27 


2 


17 



Table VIII. — Number of Poor Persons Discharged from Support or Relief 

during the Year ending March 31, 1939, classified by 

Character of Discharge and Sex* 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Aggregate 40,772 11,757 52,529 

Male 20,139 6,900 27,039 

Female . . . 20,633 4,857 25,490 

To care of relatives and friends: 

Total 10,234 2,739 12,973 

Male 5,233 1,398 6,631 

Female .. 5,001 1,341 6,342 

To other institutions: 

Total 3,249 1,281 4,530 

Male 1,519 720 2,239 

Female- 1,730 561 2,291 

To care of self: 

Total 20,167 6,781 26,948 

Male 9,605 4,185 13,790 

Female 10.562 2,596 13.158 

Died: 

Total 7,122 956 8,078 

Male 3,782 597 4,379 

Female 3,340 359 3,699 

*Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment. 



3,365 


21,321 


744 


7,038 


136 


1,511 


1,657 


12,501 


903 


6,228 


712 


5,136 


354 


2,591 


199 


1,466 


1,252 


6,975 



150 P.D. 17. 

Table IX. — Number of Foreign-born Persons who Received Public Relief 
during the Year ending March 31, 1939, classified by Countries of Birth* 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Total foreign born 55,445 9,322 64,767 

Number born in: 

Canada . 17,956 

England and Wales 6,294 

Germanv 1,375 

Ireland' 10,844 

Italy 5.325 

Russia and Poland 4,424 

Scandinavia 2,237 

Scotland 1,267 

Other countries 5,723 



Table X. — Percentage of the Various Classes of Persons Relieved at Public 

Expense during the Year ending March 31, 1939, to the 

Whole Xumber so Relieved* 

Source of Relief 

Total number of persons relieved* 227,468 

Percentage: 

Local 85.7 

State 14.3 

Place of Relief: 
In Institutions: 

Total 9.45 

Infirmaries 4.14 

Other institutions 3.14 

State institutions 2.17 

Outside: 

Total 90.55 

Private families 18.52 

Own homes 72.03 

Age : 

20 and under 28.70 

21 to 59 22.85 

60 and over 47.73 

Unknown .72 

Sex: 

Male 45.82 

Female 54.18 

Color: 

White 97.99 

Colored 2.01 

Mental Condition: 

Sane 99.91 

Insane .03 

Idiotic .04 

Epileptic .02 



Table XI. — Numerical Relation to the Whole Population of the Several Classes 
of Persons Relieved at Public Expense during the Year ending March 31, 1939. i 

Population, 1935 . . 4,350,910 

Xumber per 1.000 of Population: 

Of all Persons Relieved* 52.29 

Of Males 23.96 

Of Females 28.33 

Of Native Born 37.19 

Of Foreign Born 14.89 

Of Native Born of Foreign Parentage 11.92 

Of Unknown Birth .21 

Of Vagrants 4.97 

* Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment. 

f Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment — 99.77. 



152 



Table XII. — Cost to Cities 



P.D. 17; 

Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poo\ fo^ 
In most cases the reports are for thi 



CITIES AND 
TOWNS 



Grand Total 
Expenditures 



Total 



Ordinar 



IN INSTITUTIONS 



In 
Infirmaries 



In Other 
Institutions 



Outside 



In Private 
Families 



In Own 
Homes 



1 Abington 

2 Acton . 

3 Acushnet 

4 Adams 

5 Agawam 

6 Alford 

7 Amesbury 

8 Amherst 

9 Andover 

10 Arlington 

11 Ashburnhai 

12 Ashby 

13 Ashfield 

14 Ashland 

15 Athol 

16 Attleboro 

17 Auburn i 

18 Avon . 

19 Ayer . 

20 Barnstable 

21 Barre 

22 Becket 

23 Bedford 

24 Belchertown 

25 Bellingham 

26 Belmont . 

27 Berkley . 

28 Berlin 1 

29 Bernardston 

30 Beverly 

31 Billerica . 

32 Blackstone 

33 Blandford . 

34 Bolton 

35 Boston 

36 Bourne 

37 Boxborough 

38 Boxford 

39 Boylston l 

40 Braintree . 

41 Brewster . 

42 Bridgewater 

43 Brimfield . 

44 Brockton . 

45 Brookfield 1 

46 Brookline . 

47 Buckland . 

48 Burlington 

49 Cambridge 

50 Canton 

51 Carlisle 

52 Carver 

53 Charlemont 

54 Charlton 1 

55 Chatham 

56 Chelmsford 

57 Chelsea 

58 Cheshire 

59 Chester 

60 Chesterfield 

61 Chicopee 

62 Chilmark 

63 Clark sbur 

64 Clinton 

65 Cohasset 

66 Colrain 

67 Concord 

68 Conway 

69 Cummingto 

70 Dalton 

71 Danvers 

72 Dartmouth 

73 Dedham 

74 Deerfield 

75 Dennis 

76 Dighton 



$119,045 99 
36,534 69 
51,683 18 

154,964 63 
75,994 41 
4,952 43 

163,856 56 
65,740 12 
97,216 26 

270,651 73 

37,847 78 

10,558 42 

6,741 77 

27,628 13 

135,463 88 

320,424 13 
82,963 65 
35,155 85 
40,325 53 

182,831 67 
47,110 29 
13,098 27 
25,998 27 
32,443 10 
50,702 24 

107,058 43 

21,759 27 

14,366 06 

7,687 00 

373,977 20 

105,528 32 

77,963 69 

7,504 78 

13,777 93 

14,347,029 94 

71,863 17 

3,134 40 

9,109 56 

11,425 63 

245,097 87 
18,989 92 
80,932 73 
11,737 59 
1,199,651 23 
16,360 66 

494,885 95 

24,357 30 

43,295 50 

1,628,675 94 

104,507 27 
6,830 72 
24,688 14 
17,042 05 
43,633 83 
29,504 88 
96,833 24 

761,297 83 

35,501 66 

23,255 16 

9,825 94 

580,650 46 

3,654 65 

23,732 31 

234,187 96 
46 t 493 52 
20,777 03 
60,925 11 
17,321 79 
9,990 51 
58,735 04 

112,173 59 

129,144 97 

231,393 12 
27,173 11 
52,149 11 
47,490 96 



$119,045 99 
36,534 69 
51,683 18 

154,964 63 

75,994 41 

4,952 43 

163,856 56 
65,740 12 
97,216 26 

270,651 73 

37,847 78 

10,558 42 

6,741 77 

27,628 13 

135,463 88 

320,424 13 
82,963 65 
35,155 85 
40,325 53 

182,831 67 
46,883 64 
13,098 27 
25,998 27 
32,443 10 
50,702 24 

107,058 43 

21,759 27 

14,366 06 

7,687 00 

373,977 20 

105,528 32 

77,963 69 

7,504 78 

13,777 93 

14,345,816 75 

71,863 17 

3,134 40 

9,109 56 

11,425 63 

245,097 87 
18,989 92 
80,932 73 
11,737 59 
1,199,651 23 
16,360 66 

494,885 95 

24,357 30 

43,295 50 

1,628,675 94 

• 104,507 27 

6,830 72 

24,688 14 

17,042 05 

43,633 83 

29,504 88 

96,833 24 

761,297 83 

35,501 66 

23,255 16 

9,825 94 

580,650 46 

3,654 65 

23,732 31 

234,187 96 
46,493 52 
20,777 03 
60,488 78 
17,321 79 
9,990 51 
58,735 04 

112,173 59 

129,144 97 

231,393 12 
27,173 11 
52,149 11 
47,490 96 



$160 96 
8,025 70 

9,301 21 

9,127 67 

1,308 00 

578 72 



7,640 38 

8,682 05 

703 04 

3,661 37 
5,494 19 
3,323 83 



164 00 



19,876 04 
5,310 04 



751,058 98 

8,931 58 

3.281 37 

58,599 98 

69 87 

10,533 46 

66,288 37 

1,452 92 

4.282 79 
1,117 43 

31,921 97 
8,531 83 
6,444 71 



412 50 
4,461 40 
9,155 80 

424 14 



$10,111 21 

151 00 

3,374 27 

2,201 96 

2,969 80 

522 67 

4,342 17 

1,881 18 

3,113 93 

11,172 95 

2,397 97 

498 76 

474 15 

4,824 01 

14,191 41 

3,485 13 

992 47 

332 00 

6,844 81 

1,395 29 

46 00 

756 35 

1,376 16 

1,171 55 

6,178 71 

247 80 

488 25 

15,989 87 
4,572 47 
1,833 09 

25 00 
37,361 36 

477 90 

246 62 

124 10 

5,057 02 

561 17 

1,013 38 

376 89 

48,893 13 

220 05 

9,647 32 

1,120 25 

71 00 

9,488 61 

1,543 18 

76 00 

413 29 

127 50 

735 34 

588 00 
41,266 52 

196 42 

434 40 

28,560 76 

1,370 50 

3,275 76 

2,394 11 

805 53 

914 66 

393 59 

379 50 

996 95 

2,449 12 

5,382 20 

2,449 19 

563 80 

2,133 56 

964 90 



$1,270 65 

$858 00 
1,170 88 
4,642 26 
210 00 
1,937 86 
2,744 58 
2,296 50 
6,742 13 



156 00 

619 53 

3,225 00 

965 27 

294 00 
3,664 75 

373 60 
1,048 00 

713 54 

284 74 

3,441 03 

468 00 
573 00 

1,070 77 
85 00 

517 63 
282,105 63 



80 00 
309 00 
998 49 
409 20 

1,104 00 

280 00 

11,377 38 

441 03 

666 57 

1,507 62 

16,811 90 



472 58 

652 63 
1,714 37 
■ 369 65 

811 02 
3,904 79 
2,557 22 

774 04 

7,479 80 

901 53 
8,436 20 
1,174 00 
1,781 14 
3,973 66 

665 07 

672 82 
4,627 91 
5,141 18 

730 92 
3,402 48 
1,739 83 
1,874 07 
2,126 01 



$32,277 

7,099 

18,021 

39,220 

23,062 

160 

28,319 

12,591 

21,820 

104,483 

15,045 

1,714 

769 

8,006 

50,099 

96,297 

30,825 

6,998 

4,819 

69,038 

18,800 

2,460 

7,332 

4,927 

15,853 

43,404 

5,607 

2,713 

1,872 

137,814 

25,891 

35,374 

1,293 

1,767 

5,260,767 

20,531 

422 

2,052 

1,331 

88,458 

3,515 

22,204 

1,485 

331,401 

2,020 

242,996 

2,600 

17,738 

855,706 

50,643 

600 

10,084 

2,070 

19,412 

3,936 

30,149 

464,767 

14,494 

5,701 

1,272 

261,231 

177 

5,083 

81,391 

19,421 

4,328 

18,759 

2,073 

1,482 

16,252 

27,372 

42,878 

121,474 

6,123 

12,380 

23,478 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



it. in. 

persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Ozv 
fiscal year ending December 31, 1938. 



153 



Homes. 



Expenditures 






Receipts 


















Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 


Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 






Administra- 


On Account 
of Support or 


All 










Aid to 


Old Age 

Assistance 


tion 


Relief in 


Other 




Institutions 




Dependent 




Infirmaries 










Children 
















4,349 72 


70,504 72 


532 05 





60,236 85 


58,809 14 


_ 


1 


2,347 60 


26,465 80 


310 27 


— 


23,457 06 


13,077 63 


— 


2 


1,868 00 


26,896 51 


665 26 


— 


26,248 92 


25,434 26 


— 


3 


26,361 60 


75,484 15 


2,499 54 


1,114 04 


65,794 88 


88,055 71 


— 


4 


5,789 35 


34,695 61 


4,835 05 


— 


38,635 13 


37,359 28 


— 


5 


' — 


4,028 92 


30 00 


— 


2,902 37 


2,050 06 


— 


6 


10,837 60 


105,646 97 


3,471 52 


271 78 


103,676 83 


59,907 95 


— 


7 


7,677 00 


38,224 20 


2,621 58 


— 


37,374 62 


28,365 50 


— 


8 


9,408 73 


49,002 24 


2,446 52 


204 00 


50,415 23 


46,597 03 


— 


9 


33,767 85 


100,047 66 


13,129 38 


— 


123,178 08 


147,473 65 


— 


10 


3,258 00 


16,203 00 


364 75 


— 


18,217 14 


19,630 64 


— 


11 


1,074 00 


7,116 93 


154 25 


— 


7,561 17 


2,997 25 


— 


12 


— 


5,872 26 


100 00 


— 


5,634 61 


1,107 16 


— 


13 


3,621 00 


15,088 92 


281 10 


— 


12,723 98 


14,904 15 


— 


14 


2,137 00 


66,276 13 


3,867 42 


341 30 


73,236 77 


61,885 81 


— 


15 


41,349 61 


144,074 48 


12,603 94 


— 


168,234 76 


152,189 37 


— 


16 


5,779 25 


38,606 25 


2,599 41 


— 


37,633 69 


45,329 96 


— 


17 


3,746 56 


23,093 53 


325 00 


— 


15,547 57 


19,608 28 


— 


18 


2,925 50 


26,572 84 


1,720 70 


465 10 


27,057 59 


12,802 84 


— 


19 


16,512 56 


71,506 49 


9,770 83 


60 00 


77,172 83 


105,598 84 


— 


20 


1,615 05 


20,629 07 


746 14 


302 50 


12,306 60 


34,274 54 


226 65 


21 


612 00 


8,411 35 


520 00 


— 


10,241 01 


2,857 26 


— 


22 


2,662 58 


14,156 40 


376 87 


— 


15,517 56 


10,480 71 


— 


23 


1,440 00 


24,026 71 


387 63 


— 


21,994 24 


10,448 86 


— 


24 


5,773 55 


27,404 73 


498 57 


— 


23,436 87 


27,265 37 


— 


25 


7,539 17 


38,869 36 


7,461 73 


— 


50,852 50 


56,205 93 


— 


26 


1,941 50 


13,902 29 


60 33 


— 


11,291 27 


10,468 00 


— 


27 


452 80 


10,043 24 


200 00 


— 


9,291 06 


5,075 00 


— 


23 


416 00 


4,810 72 


15 00 


— 


4,568 57 


3,118 43 


— 


29 


53,090 50 


125,388 96 • 


21,817 43 


2,539 20 


160,335 56 


211,102 44 


— 


30 


7,056 90 


59,273 15 


2,353 13 


2,650 70 


65,269 19 


37,608 43 


— 


31 


7,268 90 


30,737 60 


2,664 46 


— 


34,935 29 


43,028 40 


— 


32 


863 68 


5,322 07 


25 25 


— 


4,362 16 


3,142 62 


— 


33 


425 50 


10,919 14 


123 33 


— 


9,400 60 


4,377 33 


— 


34 


2,230,541 25 


4,578,253 36 


1,205,729 00 


17,496 69 


6,020,426 21 


8,307,893 85 


1,213 19 


35 


7,938 95 


41,425 85 


1,966 62 


— 


39,402 09 


32,461 08 


— 


36 


1,320 73 


853 83 


59 33 


— 


1,256 45 


1,877 95 


— 


37 


336 00 


6,097 51 


297 02 


— 


. 4,659 41 


4,450 15 


— 


38 


90 00 


9,085 42 


485 47 


— 


7,229 17 


4,196 46 


— 


39 


20,138 44 


113,847 46 


7,666 43 


266 00 


126,832 74 


117,999 13 


— 


40 


1,761 17 


12,739 69 


3 25 


— 


9,976 42 


9,013 50 


— 


41 


9,863 38 


39,621 68 


3,844 51 


1,777 60 


38,868 16 


40,286 97 


— 


42 


540 00 


8,720 17 


335 38 


— 


8,034 53 


3,703 06 


— 


43 


83,813 17 


627,413 53 


38,152 77 


5,876 35 


597,330 85 


596,444 03 


— 


44 


58 00 


13,064 66 


486 57 


— 


12,778 58 


3,582 08 


— 


45 


38,540 62 


175,888 44 


16,613 32 


— 


239,680 54 


255,205 41 


— 


46 


2,265 00 


16,186 88 


676 84 


— 


12,665 49 


11,691 81 


— 


47 


3,023 85 


21,827 66 


634 32 


— 


20,979 34 


22,316 16 


— 


48 


196,998 79 


441,816 24 


41,565 48 


4,715 57 


596,326 14 


1,027,634 23 


— 


49 


18,352 41 


31,597 38 . 


2,370 75 


— 


42,616 76 


61,890 51 


— 


50 


278 47 


5,753 90 


121 47 


— 


4,730 01 


2,100 71 


— 


51 


702 63 


11,949 75 


1,065 09 


— 


10,825 98 


13,862 16 


— 


52 




13,591 65 


600 00 


— 


12,317 33 


4,724 72 


— 


53 


1,182 75 


18,252 67 


883 65 


— 


21,567 80 


22,066 03 


— 


54 


1,094 37 


23,368 48 


736 07 


— 


19,627 26 


9,877 62 


— 


55 


6,643 30 


51,434 79 


2,923 79 


1,611 17 


60,944 37 


34,277 70 


— 


56 


70,808 29 


156,697 75 


22,735 34 


— 


334,200 84 


427,096 99 


— 


57 


830 00 


17,454 47 


165 50 


— 


16,373 81 


19,127 85 


— 


58 


4,036 00 


11,728 07 


769 58 


— 


12,638 54 


10.616 62 


— 


59 


300 00 


7,117 98 


701 01 


— 


5,912 39 


3,913 55 


— 


60 


90,937 01 


142,633 71 


17,885 75 


981 00 


172,740 63 


406,928 83 


— 


61 


80 00 


3,254 84 


141 91 


— 


3,036 08 


618 57 


— 


62 


5 1.852 00 


13,280 96 


1,243 54 


— 


12,709 11 


11,023 20 


— 


63 


5 16,268 55 


110,188 12 


6,095 81 


76 00 


105,726 01 


128,385 95 


— 


64 


3,368 90 


17,211 00 


2,924 27 


— 


22,332 90 


24,160 62 


— 


65 


3,085 00 


10,188 65 


587 83 


— 


10,322 29 


10,454 74 


— 


66 


4,889 34 


22,896 47 


2,610 06 


4,075 56 


25,175 79 


31,237 43 


436 33 


67 


1,086 00 


13,103 47 


— 


— 


12,122 30 


5,199 49 


— 


68 


720 50 


6,575 23 


160 00 


— 


7,632 37 


2.35'8 14 


— 


69 


i 7.914 45 


27,504 '59 


1,438 96 


— 


34,400 88 


24.334 16 


— 


70 


B 10,793 88 


62,833 99 


3,169 96 


— 


65,032 43 


47,141 16 


— 


71 


8 4,674 50 


60,368 98 


10,648 71 


161 68 


64,647 35 


64,335 94 


— 


72 


I 14,062 85 


71,455 60 


9,392 50 


53 00 


95,619 58 


135.720 54 


— 


73 


6 4,646 90 


13,364 62 


734 22 


— 


14,846 05 


12,327 06 


— 


74 


II 2,908 00 


31,448 07 


980 42 


— 


30,856 29 


21,292 82 


— 


75 


1 4,694 41 


15,509 42 


717 66 


— 


22,965 90 


24,525 06 


~ 


76 


'i 

















154 



Table XII. — Cost to Cities and 



P.D. 17 

Towns of Supporting and Relieving Pool 











Grand Total 


Total 


OrdinarJ 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




Outside 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 




















In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 1 


1 Douglas . . . $37,402 27 


$37,402 27 


$1,460 95 


$1,437 52 




$15,221 381 


2 Dover . 




6,412 68 


6,412 68 


— 


— 


$432 00 


718 35 


3 Dracut 




88,081 38 


88,081 38 


— 


2,638 56 


1,841 61 


31,677 07 


4 Dudley 




51,126 23 


51,126 23 


929 94 


2,352 95 


— 


26,753 19 


5 Dunstable 




3,168 85 


3,168 85 


— 


156 00 


73 58 


240 41 


6 Duxbury . 




46,196 20 


46,196 20 


2,649 71 


1,260 95 


785 55 


10,135 02 i 


7 East Bridgewater . 


90,486 42 


90,486 42 


— 


— 


4,081 12 


41,384 17 


8 East Brookfieldi 


11,534 18 


11,534 18 


312 94 


70 00 


— 


2,321 03 


9 East Longmeadow 


31,284 97 


31,284 97 


— 


1,519 00 


450 00 


9,556 73 


10 Eastham 


9,098 73 


9,098 73 


— 


366 40 


— 


2,892 43 j 


11 Easthampton 




153,168 78 


153,168 78 


6,999 82 


6,168 76 


2,518 13 


58,626 29' 


12 Easton 




83,418 67 


83,418 67 


4,550 56 


2,158 09 


53 00 


25,064 44 


13 Edgartown 




26,278 67 


26,278 67 


— 


— 


— 


6,737 26 : 


14 Egremont . 




9,085 47 


9,085 47 


— 


260 00 


— 


785 17' 


IS Erving 




23,255 63 


23,255 63 


— 


— 


1,024 80 


12,873 17 


16 Essex 




22,281 66 


22,281 66 


— 


730 00 


288 71 


3,690 27 


17 Everett 




778,220 92 


778,220 92 


4,269 11 


14,624 29 


15,648 13 


424,709 16 


18 Fairhaven . 




150,404 80 


150,404 80 


7,843 61 


5,377 09 


— 


49,831 78 


19 Fall River 




1,513,261 17 


1,513,261 17 


71,468 18 


8,476 86 


— 


609,884 48 


20 Falmouth . 




111,231 09 


111,231 09 


3,590 96 


6,629 92 


1,146 00 


47 : 268 16 


21 Fitchburg . 




611,572 20 


611,572 20 


18,974 04 


17,518 43 


10,056 57 


. 272,040 95 


22 Florida 




4,121 04 


4,121 04 


— 


99 00 


841 29 


674 50 


23 Foxborough 




77,554 50 


77,554 50 


453 70 


644 25 


3,140 83 


22,413 85 


24 Framingham 




315,512 78 


315,512 78 


— 


17,322 86 


6,845 70 


105,317 85 


25 Franklin . 




100,846 96 


100,846 96 


8,855 56 


2,302 64 


1,759 51 


32,485 25 


26 Freetown . 




27,543 92 


27,543 92 


1,440 75 


472 40 


— 


2,478 03 


27 Gardner 




176,791 00 


176,576 00 


9,380 13 


3,498 54 


1,967 44 


59,401 66 


28 Gay Head 




2,537 50 


2,537 50 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29 Georgetown 




40,970 50 


40,970 50 


— 


2,958- 20 


— 


4,731 27, 


30 Gill . 




5,791 89 


5,791 W 


— 


741 02 


— 


359 32 


31 Gloucester 




343,568 09 


343,568 09 


24,893 84 


3,111 18 


— 


90,146 30 


32 Goshen 




3,979 07 


3,979 07 


— 


— 


446. 00 


299 75, 


33 Gosnold 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


34 Grafton 




90,552 41 


90,552 41 


— 


2,143 38 


1,962 25 


31,746 11 


35 Granby 




7,610 32 


7,610 32 


— 


576 44 


— 


2,706 65 


36 Granville . 




5,957 89 


5,957 89 


— 


354 54 


829 78 


401 57 


37 Great Barringt 


an 


103,400 24 


103,400 24 


— 


4,844 16 


4,338 71 


28,172 08 


38 Greenfield . 




200,254 97 


199,622 97 


7,948 31 


5,975 65 


2,140 63 


47,999 61 


39 Groton 




26,496 01 


26,496 01 


— 


512 50 


1,119 51 


3,986 94 


40 Groveland 




40,997 71 


40,997 71 


— 


980 01 


1,433 00 


7,653 82 


41 Hadley 




8,876 64 


8,876 64 


— 


457 00 


— 


310 93 


42 Halifax 




19,922 33 


19,922 33 


424 50 


359 50 


— 


2,398 59 


43 Hamilton . 




26,424 16 


26,424 16 


— 


1,518 66 


— 


10,795 04 


44 Hampden . 




12,180 60 


12,180 60 


— 


353 95 


813 54 


1,510 66 


45 Hancock 




7,745 36 


7,745 36 


— 


— 


— 


2,099 30 


46 Hanover 




49,116 18" 


49,116 18 


— 


1,553 65 


667 66 


11,013 73 


47 Hanson 




61,461 34 


61,461 34 


1,927 70 


2,673 60 


1,471 00 


23,230 60 


48 Hardwick 1 




33,726 34 


33,726 34 


1,393 22 


— 


— 


15,800 32 


49 Harvard . 




9,715 63 


9,715 63 


— 


507 50 


245 00 


733 00 


50 Harwich . 




48,369 69 


48,369 69 


2,378 84 


2,207 85 


— 


9,685 34 


51 Hatfield . 




12,738 91 


12,738 91 


— 


906 49 


1,915 40 


768 27 


52 Haverhill . 




915,043 22 


915,043 22 


49,678 50 


5,374 74 


5,829 21 


257,647 93 


53 Hawley 




6,304 64 


6,304 64 


— 


— 


— 


561 30 


54 Heath . 




6,002 28 


6,002 28 


— 


96 65 


29.9 93 


766 04 


55 Hingham . 




77,955 96 


77,146 79 


4,608 56 


2,010 81 


96 32 


17,186 45 


56 Hinsdale . 




35,659 14 


35,659 14 


— 


782 00 


802 51 


18,419 35 


57 Holbrook . 




59,237 84 


59,237 84 


— 


— 


— 


10,157 61 


58 Holdeni . 




59,606 38 


59,606 38 


312 94 


6,697 67 


2,029 00 


25,229 87 


59 Holland i . 




2,703 11 


2,703 11 


— 


— 


— 


207 22 


60 Holliston . 




51,524 74 


51,524 74 


3,731 15 


411 05 


784 28 


13,768 93 


61 Holyoke 




655,791 31 


655,791 31 


45,488 36 


32,081 19 


373 00 


252,301 95 


62 Hopedale . 




26,750 86 


26,750 86 


1,234 99 


1,049 06 


— 


7,132 m 


63 Hopkinton 




52,898 67 


52,898 67 


— 


3,303 46 


— 


9,605 67; 


64 Hubbardston 1 




17,912 84 


17,912 84 


— 


817 95 


— 


3,034 72] 


65 Hudson 




140,903 41 


140,903 41 


6,748 61 


5,637 00 


624 00 


46,881 1? 


66 Hull . 




60,069 57 


60,069 57 


— 


1,395 77 


1,568 71 


31,120 81 


67 Huntington 




20,265 50 


20,265 50 


— 


— 


120 00 


5,766 05 


68 Ipswich 




76,558 48 


76,558 48 


5,983 90 


4,110 88 


712 70 


28,515 5S 


69 Kingston . 




46,566 36 


46,566 36 


— 


1,295 04 


414 85 


12,628 21 


70 Lakeville 




24,785 79 


24,785 79 


— 


447 49 


— 


4,245 7t 


71 Lancaster . 




38,337 01 


38,337 01 


937 59 


1,350 77 


648 00 


9,813 71 


72 Lanesborough 




15,047 76 


15,047 76 


— 


641 60 


197 00 


3,236 21 


73 Lawrence . 




. 1,104,514 48 


1,104,514 48 


147,577 35 


7,427 15 


5,694 28 


392,386 31 


74 Lee 




60,597 27 


60,597 27 


624 00 


607 18 


1,451 12 


17,636 7< 


75 Leicester l 




59,278 27 


59,278 27 


1,040 84 


— 


312 00 


23,312 07 


76 Lenox . . . 32,909 38 


32,909 38 


— 


3,138 46 


1,214 00 


13,083 5t 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



ft. III. 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Ozvn Homes- 



155 



-Continued. 



Aid to 

Dependent 

Children 



Old Age 

Assistance 



Administra- 
tion 



Receipts 



On Account 

of Support or 

Relief in 

Infirmaries 



All 
Other 



Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 



Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 
Institutions 



2,699 68 

3,969 63 
8,333 60 
144 00 
3,153 65 
7,379 63 

422 10 

633 12 

21,428 21 

3,387 50 

2,393 82 

504 00 

985 00 
84,091 02 
15,322 04 
142,026 1.9 
11,903 40 
57,148 98 

4,572 46 
34,130 00 
11,987 37 
484 50 
15,909 33 

3,000 30 

22,174 41 



14,530 81 

5,217 33 
45,418 78 
11,906 49 

2,554 86 
26,388 31 
34,274 57 

8,323 24 
17,854 08 

5,093 54 
51,446 38 
46,682 93 
16,349 17 

7,461 30 

9,032 66 
16,092 68 
206,229 21 
68,799 33 
630,609 56 
34,056 16 
211,244 86 

2,171 25 
44,457 90 
142,551 56 
41,359 59 
22,273 24 
80,561 22 

2,537 50 
29,846 06 

4,349 40 
187,799 82 

3,178 02 



2,051 93 

45 00 

2,535 73 

850 06 

1,823 01 
3,366 93 

506 97 
1,483 06 

113 24 
5,981 19 
1,522 15 

798 42 
75 00 

325 00 

495 00 

28,650 00 

3,230 95 

50,795 90 

6,636 49 

24,588 37 

335 00 
1,871 51 
9,344 81 
2,097 04 

395 00 
5,857 68 

434 67 

342 15 

15,442 54 

55 30 



373 49 



1,335 62 
99 80 



2,521 24 

389 21 

1,777 20 



657 79 
2,624 62 



2,585 16 



20,409 48 

4,012 36 
41,861 50 
21,256 17 

2,002 49 
24,532 13 
46,002 18 

8,878 08 
16,748 62 

4,878 56 
56,455 36 
42,565 27 
14,088 89 

5,447 10 

15,807 25 

14,936 53 

368,902 15 

91,444 44 

689,617 91 

47,019 27 

349,451 63 

2,683 12 
44,659 04 
164,469 39 
46,278 89 
20,822 91 
92,018 05 

1,525 11 
28,966 95 

3,367 84 
180,356 89 

2,517 47 



10,131 26 


42,390 42 


2,178 99 


— 


52,241 51 


— 


4,152 23 


175 00 


— 


3,550 70 


560 00 


3,772 00 


40 00 


— 


2,907 45 


3,703 09 


59,781 38 


2,560 82 


— 


65,725 43 


16,701 92 


107,678 44 


11,178 41 


1,017 48 


102,385 18 


1,688 50 


18,561 93 


626 63 


— 


16,000 33 


1,445 00 


28,224 67 


1,261 21 


— 


24,542 01 


1,440 00 


6,512 34 


156 37 


— 


4,888 33 


2,380 50 


14,041 31 


317 93 


— 


13,805 85 


840 89 


12,222 81 


1,046 76 


— 


14,326 91 


- 240 00 


9,211 22 


51 23 


— 


9,274 94 


— 


5,470 36 


175 70 


— 


5,852 81 


2,596 25 


32,215 25 


1,069 64 


— 


40,528 04 


1,430 00 


29,928 44 


800 00 


30 00 


26,205 26 


2,208 91 


13,280 66 


1,043 23 


— 


18,712 05 


1,205 00 


6,938 78 


86 35 


— 


6,303 77 


3,500 69 


29,196 97 


1,400 00 


— 


26,232 28 


96 00 


8,679 97 


372 78 


— 


8,332 79 


108,535 84 


448,865 57 


39,111 43 


11,623 64 


474,728 24 


818 85 


4,924 49 


— 


— 


3,856 58 





4,839 66 


— 


— 


3,848 32 


7,464 39 


41,736 84 


4,043 42 


416 00 


42,268 39 


189 54 


13,622 24 


1,843 50 


— 


14,054 36 


3,318 11 


45,086 15 


675 91 


— 


40,621 12 


4,142 00 


20,467 99 


726 91 


— 


29,922 70 


213 73 


2,166 70 


115 46 


— 


2,035 38 


2,008 64 


30,435 56 


385 13 


1,467 35 


33,712 84 


60,640 98 


245,061 97 


19,843 86 


4,385 58 


248.557 46 


4,086 80 


12,747 78 


500 00 


— 


16,136 48 


3,514 44 


34,841 47 


1,633 63 


— 


36,248 53 


2,043 00 


11,792 16 


225 00 


— 


10,358 52 


10,454 03 


65,552 30 


5,006 29 


1,176 13 


79,429 01 


3,851 70 


20,057 78 


2,074 80 


— 


12,812 67 


1,925 00 


12,454 41 


— 


— 


8,393 41 


4,685 21 


29,668 96 


2,881 24 


3,132 18 


33,493 25 


3,336 92 


27,631 19 


1,260 08 


— 


27,845 97 


48 00 


19,460 88 


583 66 


— 


18,157 44 


3,292 85 


20,714 57 


1,579 48 


584 00 


22,031 18 


240 00 


10,686 51 


46 43 


— 


8,712 15 


64,281 13 


466,769 08 


20,379 18 


11,982 75 


442,225 38 


4.495 50 


34,290 79 


1,491 94 


— 


25,700 25 


10^32 90 


21,882 79 


2,597 67 


— 


28,422 74 


1,936 55 


11,499 22 


2,037 59 


— 


21.029 54 



16,992 79 
2,400 32 

46.219 88 
29,870 06 

1,166 36 
21,290 58 
44,484 24 

2,656 10 
14,536 35 

4,220 17 
95,377 80 
40,753 60 
12,189 78 

3,638 37 

7,448 38 

7,345 13 
409,318 77 
58,960 36 
821,122 02 
63,822 61 
260,343 37 

1,437 92 
32,895 46 
151,043 39 
53,910 28 

6,721 01 
81,933 33 

1,012 39 
12,003 55 

2,424 05 
160,626 04 

1,461 60 

38,310 90 
4,059 62 
3,050 44 

37,674 81 

96.220 31 
10,495 68 
16,455 70 

3,988 31 

6,116 48 

12,097 25 

2,905 66 

1,892 55 

8,588 14 

35,226 08 

15,014 29 

3,411 86 

22,137 41 

4,406 12 

428,691 34 

2,448 06 

2,153 96 

34,462 40 

21,604 78 

18,616 72 

29,683 68 

667 73 

16,344 55 

402,848 27 

10,614 38 

16,650 14 

7,554 32 

60,298 27 

47,256 90 

11,872 09 

39,933 05 

18.720 37 
6,628 35 

15.721 83 
6,335 61 

650,306 35 
34,897 02 
30,855 53 
11,879 84 



215 00 



632 00 



809 17 



56 P.D. 17 

Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poot 











Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinary 


inr.- 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




Outside 






TOWNS 


Expenditures 












. 










In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 












Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


("■■' 


1 Leominster . . $341,604 91 


$341,604 91 


$12,665 85 


$6,962 72 


$3,908 81 


$134,612 22 




2 Leverett . 




13,160 42 


13,160 42 


— 


844 79 


— 


2,455 87 




3 Lexington . 




126,348 00 


126,348 00 


— 


4,129 89 


6,787 41 


60,138 07 




4 Leyden 




2,600 70 


2,600 70 


— 


— 


— 


431 55 




5 Lincoln 




14,828 32 


14,828 32 


— 


— 


— 


2,485 28 




6 Littleton . 




9,495 89 


9,495 89 


— 


616 97 


157 50 


2,011 57 




7 Longmeadow 




18,225 07 


18,225 70 


417 00 


210 40 


373 06 


5,817 61 




8 Lowell 




1,914,801 87 


1,911,833 87 


88,404 08 


88,152 13 


6,905 00 


754,847 41 




9 Ludlow 




132,979 20 


132,979 20 


— 


6,248 18 


910 05 


78,502 18 




10 Lunenburg 




30,192 55 


30,192 55 


— 


915 14 


1,298 46 


7,150 35 




11 Lvnn . 




1,553,345 97 


1,553,345 97 


31,484 44 


33,013 94 


5,143 35 


521,899 70 




12 Lynnfield . 




23,584 88 


23,584 88 


— 


1,256 85 


260 00 


5,886 92 




13 Maiden 




907,386 03 


907,386 03 


20,052 25 


38,885 09 


3,110 04 


432,240 99 




14 Manchester 




34,853 77 


34,853 77 


3,983 93 


1,708 82 


440 00 


10,423 91 




15 Mansfield . 




85,697 20 


85,697 20 


5,870 15 


2,375 04 


2,071 96 


27,613 25 




16 Marblehead 




125,069 67 


125,069 67 


7,259 20 


389 00 


335 71 


19,587 31 




17 Marion 




35,915 73 


35,915 73 


— 


951 99 


1,642 57 


9,794 83 




18 Marlborough 




231,209 54 


231,209 54 


10,117 38 


9,204 61 


— 


74,137 25 




19 Marshfield 




48,374 10 


48,374 10 


5,092 02 


1,212 24 


800 00 


10,568 62 




20 Mashpee . 




15,079 35 


15,079 35 


— 


— 


— 


3,455 84 




21 Mattapoisett 




31,330 32 


31,330 32 


— 


865 34 


926 32 


6,923 50 




22 Mavnard . 




100,778 96 


100,778 96 


685 81 


3,157 03 


— 


53,288 46 




23 Medfield . 




26,929 53 


26,929 53 


— 


1,814 20 


570 00 


4,064 53 




24 Medford . 




777,516 74 


776,702 99 


10,073 91 


27,874 31 


5,636 04 


365,213 74 




25 Medway 




56,006 83 


56,006 83 


— 


1,300 91 


687 85 


15,545 00 




26 Melrose 




233,304 00 


233,304 00 


1,223 00 


6,948 84 


3,588 00 


75,800 76 




27 Mendon . 




19,682 33 


19,682 33 


— 


243 23 


48 50 


6,817 04 




28 Merrimac . 




61,458 44 


61,458 44 


— 


62 65 


1,532 89 


16,519 35 




29 Methuen . 




256,914 51 


256,914 51 


10,999 94 


7,022 97 


431 00 


93,418 03 




30 Middleborough 




167,820 79 


167,820 79 


7,750 80 


1,108 35 


3,144 73 


23,139 10 




31 Middlefield 




1,351 48 


1,351 48 


— 


— 


— 


744 41 




32 Middleton 




31,137 62 


31,137 62 


— 


1,115 00 


— 


10,259 68 




33 Milford 




248,038 70 


231,243 02 


17,734 52 


13,895 82 


416 00 


55,247 77 




34 Millbury 1 




105,043 56 


105,043 56 


1,919 66 


3,879 91 


— 


54,019 90 




35 Millis 




33,056 13 


33,056 13 


— 


298 75 


988 00 


9,165 24 




36 Millville . 




40,269 69 


40,269 69 


384 48 


128 00 


— 


21,339 64 




37 Milton 




87,583 71 


87,583 71 


3,431 14 


3,339 91 


1,105 96 


21,716 64 




38 Monroe 




3,843 14 


3,843 14 


— 


172 50 


598 95 


256 90 




39 Monson 




66,671 41 


65,572 70 


8,737 82 


1,873 66 


658 00 


11,559 23 




40 Montague . 




150,226 69 


150,226 69 


4,530 95 


6,084 58 


1,819 81 


70,470 09 




41 Monterey . 




5,972 82 


5,972 82 


— 


— 


— 


817 75 




42 Montgomery 




1,433 88 


1,433 88 


— 


— 


— 


— 




43 Mount Washing 


jton 


616 31 


616 31 


— 


— 


531 47 


— 




44 Nahant 




20,613 63 


20,613 63 


— 


— ■ 


532 00 


5,068 45 




45 Nantucket 




67,313 67 


67,313 67 


3,958 33 


3,612 90 


— 


20,131 67 




46 Natick 




220,174 67 


220,174 67 


— 


6,411 50 


2,518 15 


66,645 20 




47 Needham . 




98,936 85 


98,936 85 


— 


3,043 61 


1,618 94 


33,856 78 




48 New Ashford 




1,325 80 


1,325 80 


— 


— 


— 


613 04 




49 New Bedford 




1,826,857 50 


1,826,857 50 


64,487 96 


92,959 85 


— 


689.600 89 




50 New Braintree i 


3,536 25 


3,536 25 


— 


11 00 


— 


347 25 




51 New Marlborough 


20,733 28 


20,733 28 


— 


620 64 


485 00 


5,272 03 




52 New Salem 


9,748 15 


9,748 15 


— 


102 35 


79 00 


2,433 18 




53 Newbury . 




30,195 92 


30,195 92 


— 


60 00 


2,793 08 


5,304 27 




54 Newburyport 




278,129 64 


278,019 64 


13,852 08 


2,314 29 


718 75 


69,966 10 




55 Newton 




669,133 08 


669,133 08 


11,989 96 


30,997 59 


— 


320,081 24 




56 Norfolk 




19,250 20 


19,250 20 


— 


755 90 


215 00 


2,719 60 




57 North Adams 




328,902 62 


328,902 62 


7,221 39 


7,370 57 


2,429 50 


98,484 19 




58 North Andover 


103,013 17 


102,593 17 


4,966 55 


1,948 76 


472 71 


29,024 73 




59 North Attleborougl 


i 113,398 97 


113,398 97 


6,748 85 


2,323 59 


95 00 


25,219 84 




60 North Brookfield 


39,804 57 


39,144 46 


5,966 34 


288 90 


114 00 


15,007 11 




61 North Reading 


34,526 17 


34,526 17 


— 


321 48 


910 00 


10,878 54 




62 Northampton . 


239,074 80 


239,074 80 


10,588 43 


10,136 18 


— 


78,175 06 




63 Northborough 




34,252 96 


34,252 96 


— 


722 42 


723 50 


7,003 18 




64 Northbridge 




128,011 23 


127,584 39 


8,676 35 


7,641 57 


3,518 84 


48,743 80 




65 Northfield . 




27,697 61 


27,697 61 


— 


357 80 


1,086 28 


3,550 451 




66 Norton 




31,911 19 


31,911 19 


— 


1,157 50 


2,419 37 


5,273 13i 




67 Norwell 




29,877 34 


29,877 34 


— 


— 


— 


5,815 09, 




68 Norwood 




120,677 58 


120,677 58 


316 16 


5,722 69 


15,292 60 


41,557 40, 




69 Oak Bluffs 




57,148 12 


57,148 12 


— 


2,594 53 


— 


20,282 42 




70 Oakham 1 . 




3,689 00 


3,689 00 


— 


801 80 


— 


692 63' 




71 Orange 




82,076 19 


82,076 19 


— 


1,505 71 


1,536 76 


21,348 75 




72 Orleans 




18,837 35 


18,837 35 


— 


435 95 


541 71 


2,335 54 




73 Otis . 




10,631 34 


10,631 34 


— 


— 


— 


2,254 67 




74 Oxford 




87,274 30 


87,274 30 


8,249 34 


1,621 30 


— 


33,288 02 




75 Palmer 




91,467 66 


91,467 66 


4,157 55 


5,265 30 


597 00 


32,201 78 


76 Paxton l . 5,956 96 


5,956 96 


— 


261 50 


520 71 


1,668 36 


- 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



t. III. 157 

ersons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes — Continued. 



CPENDITURES 






Receipts 


















Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 


Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 






Administra- 


On Account 
of Support or 


All 










Aid to 


Old Age 
Assistance 


tion 


Relief in 


Other 




Institutions 




Dependent 




Infirmaries 










Children 
















25,858 74 


149,094 37 


8,502 20 


3,933 25 


152,651 93 


184,969 73 




1 


— 


9,579 76 


280 00 


— 


3,515 37 


9,645 05 


— 


2 


8,460 77 


36,070 41 


10,761 45 


— 


56,254 25 


70,093 75 


— 


3 


— 


2,104 15 


65 00 


— 


2,109 99 


490 71 


. — 


4 


2,201 50 


9,961 00 


180 54 


— 


7,746 81 


7,081 51 


— 


5 


1,215 15 


5,421 88 


72 82 


— 


4,834 37 


4,661 52 


— 


6 


— 


10,793 42 


613 58 


— 


10,222 56 


8,002 51 


. — 


7 


152,102 39 


764,280 86 


57,142 00 


661 59 


744,342 88 


1,166,829 40 


2,968 00 


8 


20,293 79 


22,054 92 


4,970 08 


— 


31,088 71 


101,890 49 


— 


9 


1,382 87 


18,847 72 


598 01 


— 


17,781 96 


12,410 59 


— 


10 


110,942 88 


816,452 71 


34,408 95 


1,522 37 


833,055 52 


718,768 08 


— 


11 


535 00 


15,349 52 


296 59 


— 


14,160 75 


9,424 13 


— 


12 


48,501 81 


338,324 56 


26,271 29 


5,623 43 


431,302 56 


470,460 04 


— 


13 


2,395 77 


14,020 17 


1,881 17 


85 00 


14,337 10 


20,431 67 


— 


14 


10,320 72 


35,307 16 


2,138 92 


2,204 17 


35,811 91 


47,681 12 


— 


15 


12,119 22 


83,348 50 


2,030 73 


603 00 


77,777 48 


46,689 19 


■ — 


16 


2,912 51 


17,078 42 


3,535 41 


— 


13,280 06 


22,635 67 


— 


17 


17,647 60 


112,939 80 


7,112 90 


498 17 


108,947 26 


121,764 11 


— 


18 


1,686 77 


27,805 82 


1,208 63 


330 00 


35,165 94 


12,878 16 


— 


19 


2,411 83 


8,913 52 


298 16 


— 


8,015 68 


7,063 67 





20 


1,752 00 


20,611 16 


252 00 


— 


18,583 84 


12,746 48 


— 


21 


5,557 58 


33,762 64 


4,327 44 


— 


36,177 70 


64,601 26 


— 


22 


1,838 00 


17,958 83 


683 97 


— 


16,359 08 


10,570 45 


— 


23 


62,336 36 


285,556 61 


20,012 02 


542 25 


342,411 59 


433,749 15 


813 75 


24 


3,682 00 


32,967 49 


1,823 58 


— 


29,588 87 


26,417 96 


— 


25 


24,951 39 


112,540 61 


8,251 40 


— 


111,917 18 


121,386 82 


— 


26 


1,310 00 


10,693 35 


570 21 


— 


11,844 89 


7,837 44 


— 


27 


1,764 12 


41,032 54 


546 89 


— 


37,796 35 


23,662 09 


— 


28 


25,452 23 


115,743 54 


3,846 80 


'286 00 


133,735 84 


122,892 67 


— 


29 


13,915 11 


116,886 92 


1,875 78 


5,303 44 


119,671 27 


42,846 08 


— 


30 





585 00 


22 07 


— 


931 51 


419 97 


— 


31 


631 63 


18,299 07 


832 24 


— 


22,303 45 


8,834 17 


— 


32 


28,238 21 


99,057 55 


16,653 15 


2,217 03 


154,718 09 


74,307 90 


16,795 68 


33 


10,099 60 


32,981 27 


2,143 22 


— 


43,094 22 


61,949 34 


— 


34 


6,640 55 


15,669 69 


293 90 


— 


16,465 01 


16,591 12 


— 


35 


4,713 50 


13,454 07 


250 00 


— 


22,261 01 


18,008 68 


— 


36 


8,155 27 


46,259 84 


3,574 95 


1,307 54 


50.294 95 


35,981 22 


— 


37 


834 00 


1,974 40 


6 39 


— 


1,811 60 


2,031 54 


— 


38 


10,532 49 


31,066 54 


1,144 96 


1,454 41 


29,669 90 


34,443 39 


1,098 71 


39 


13,035 84 


49,746 94 


4,538 48 


16 65 


61,501 07 


88,708 97 


— 


40 


522 00 


4,578 60 


54 47 


— 


4,167 33 


1,805 49 


— 


41 


— 


1,357 88 


76 00 


— 


809 63 


624 25 


— 


42 





84 84 


— 


— 


— 


616 31 


— 


43 


1,039 8S 


13,666 15 


307 15 


— 


11,797 85 


8,815 78 


— 


44 


9,811 63 


27,031 70 


2,767 44 


— 


27,747 36 


39,566 31 


— 


45 


36,479 45 


98,735 37 


9,385 00 


— 


127,629 26 


92,545 41 


— 


46 


12,899 03 


41,741 12 


5,777 37 


— 


44,844 59 


54,092 26 


— 


47 


— 


631 65 


81 11 


— 


528 43 


797 37 


— 


48 


110,478 01 


843,594 24 


25,736 55 


697 96 


872,661 97 


953,497 57 


— 


49 





3,178 00 


— 


— 


2,425 04 


1,111 21 


— 


50 


766 50 


12,0S9 11 


1,500 00 


— 


8,668 92 


12,064 36 


— 


51 


102 00 


6,782 70 


248 92 


— 


6.754 29 


2,993 86 


— 


52 


1,243 55 


19,459 54 


1,335 48 


— 


15,241 62 


14,954 30 


— 


53 


18,485 59 


161,864 28 


10,818 55 


826 92 


151,009 95 


126,182 77 


110 00 


54 


93,398 63 


187,201 09 


25,464 57 


963 21 


251,101 71 


417,063 16 


— 


55 


2,932 30 


12.092 07 


535 33 


— 


10.153 20 


9,097 00 


— 


56 


24,639 24 


177,997 57 


10,760 16 


451 29 


173,611 36 


154,839 97 


— 


57 


7,252 80 


57,977 84 


949 78 


457 75 


56.178 79 


45,956 63 


420 00 


58 


13,509 10 


61,345 58 


4,157 01 


587 25 


59,263 37 


53,548 35 


— 


59 


1,968 05 


14,142 38 


1,657 68 


3,010 13 


22,708 25 


13,426 08 


660 11 


60 


829 47 


20,764 05 


822 63 


— 


17,109 67 


17,416 50 


— 


61 


20,413 44 


110,089 60 


9,672 09 


335 14 


110,700 60 


128,039 06 


— 


62 


1,667 50 


23,338 04 


798 32 


— 


23,890 32 


10,362 64 


— 


63 


15,209 84 


31,644 85 


12,149 14 


2,819 83 


51,722 46 


73,042 10 


426 84 


64 


1,680 00 


20,760 17 


262 91 


— 


20,465 23 


7,232 38 


— 


65 


1,949 00 
1,197 50 


20,694 99 
21,797 25 


417 20 
1,067 50 





15,965 33 
17,475 53 


15,945 86 
12,401 81 




66 
67 


21.864 75 


28,995 79 


6,928 19 


— 


37,832 97 


82,844 61 


— 


63 


5,088 94 


28,124 69 


1,057 54 


— 


20,781 39 


36,366 73 


— 


69 


156 00 


1,923 67 


114 90 


— 


2.052 87 


1,636 13 


— 


70 


3,632 83 


51,384 42 


2,667 72 


— 


53,082 10 


28,994 09 


— 


71 


1,072 25 


14,202 04 


249 86 


— 


11,979 13 


6,858 22 


— 


72 




8,376 67 


— 


— 


3,990 46 


6,640 88 


— 


73 


6,454 81 


36,097 61 


1,563 22 


678 51 


33,339 80 


53,255 99 


— 


74 


5,822 83 


40,788 05 


2,635 15 


1,230 97 


39,737 06 


50,449 63 


— 


75 


— 


3,418 55 


87 84 




2.536 01 


3,420 95 




76 



158 P.D. 1/in 

Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Pootf S oi 











Ordinar 


;«ki 




CITIES AND 


Grand Total 


Total 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




Outside 






TOWNS 


Expenditures 
















In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 


Aid 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


Chir 


1 Peabody . . . $429,666 58 


$429,666' 58 


$22,697 13 


$15,926 87 


$2,721 60 


$223,061 64 


r 


2 Pelham 




7,969 46 


7,969 46 


— 


504 35 


349 25 


2,397 43 




3 Pembroke . 




28,796 88 


28,796 88 


1,937 04 


— 


443 04 


9,142 94 




4 Pepperell . 




36,213 77 


36,213 77 


— 


1,367 00 


520 00 


9,903 77 




5 Peru . 




2,547 20 


2,547 20 


— 


— 


— 


632 55 




6 Petersham 1 




14,832 96 


14,832 96 


184 00 


234 00 


829 37 


4,379 35 




7 Phillipston 




7,889 73 


7,889 73 


— 


— 


1,479 35 


846 95 




8 Pittsfield . 




928,065 12 


928,065 12 


20,098 24 


40,307 00 


3,972 80 


510,168 31 




9 Plainfield . 




5,681 70 


5,681 70 


— 


208 00 


— 


571 24 




10 Plainville . 




14,027 41 


14,027 31 


— 


434 97 


556 00 


1,149 06 




11 Plymouth . 




225,912 38 


225,912 38 


6,112 89 


4,583 37 


— 


72,885 28 




12 Plympton . 




11,752 71 


11,752 71 


— 


51 40 


— 


2,072 25 


13 Princeton 1 




7,985 24 


7,985 24 


— 


710 90 


— 


846 48 




14 Provincetown 




55,676 43 


55,676 43 


2,967 24 


200 00 


— 


10,497 35 




15 Quincy 

16 Randolph . 




707,059 77 


707,059 77 


6,948 66 


12,304 47 


4,509 85 


246,263 23 






127,510 37 


127,510 37 


4,999 78 


— 


— 


36,779 32 




17 Raynham . 




24,536 23 


24,536 23 


— 


447 13 


913 76 


2,211 51 




18 Reading . 




155,990 37 


155,990 37 


273 00 


3,758 09 


3,251 33 


49,535 60 




19 Rehoboth . 




H 31,663 74 


31,663 74 


— 


2,284 75 


820 30 


9,124 86 




20 Revere 




578,788 89 


578,788 89 


— 


19,841 66 


2,481 50 


360,272 22 




21 Richmond . 




6,620 88 


6,620 88 


■ — 


260 00 


420 00 


1,525 54 




22 Rochester . 




16,740 60 


16,740 60 


— 


505 00 


280 95 


3,614 73 




23 Rockland . 




165,189 04 


165,189 04 


7,544 97 


2,381 71 


— 


42,579 72 




24 Rockport . 




68,013 37 


68,013 37 


4,055 45 


784 00 


— 


15,816 59 




25 Rowe . 




6,766 42 


6,766 42 


— 


74 47 


595 50 


740 70 




26 Rowley 




25,688 87 


25,688 87 


— 


238 00 


— 


4,063 88 




27 Royalston . 




18,272 87 


18,272 87 


— 


792 80 


— 


4,946 76 




28 Russell 




12,788 94 


12,788 94 


— 


913 80 


864 32 


3,726 74 




29 Rutland 1 . 




16,673 04 


16,673 04 


312 94 


— 


— 


8,094 51 




30 Salem . ■ 




706,414 58 


705,504 31 


21,932 79 


32,379 12 


8,457 91 


300,045 82 




31 Salisbury . 




59,022 53 


59,022 53 


— 


736 58 


365 00 


18,658 16 




32 Sandisfield 




5,360 74 


5,360 74 


219 75 


523 28 


248 45 


196 93 




33 Sandwich . 




30,327 44 


30,327 44 


— 


1,158 98 


90 00 


4,118 00 




34 Saugus 




124,851 34 


124,851 34 


4,483 12 


2,575 88 


— 


35,257 98 




35 Savoy . 




6,804 39 


6,804 39 


— 


440 15 


— 


150 34 




36 Scituate 




64,085 45 


64,085 45 


— 


1,903 00 


380 05 


19,625 00 




37 Seekonk 




42,908 35 


42,908 35 


— 


1,124 55 


76 64 


18,364 74 




38 Sharon 




35,717 52 


35,717 52 


— 


699 37 


1,293 50 


13,444 38 




39 Sheffield . 




29,632 58 


29,632 58 


— 


1,382 45 


1,722 09 


6,048 05 




40 Shelburne . 




21,159 15 


21,159 15 


— 


632 90 


941 70 


4,018 26 




41 Sherborn . 




11,948 60 


11,948 60 


— 


— 


285 20 


2,911 39 




42 Shirley 




18,294 35 


18,294 35 


— 


550 72 


817 42 


1,997 76 




43 Shrewsbury 




62,527 19 


62,527 19 


— 


3,450 80 


1,363 50 


22,497 59 




44 Shutesbury 




4,796 83 


4,796 83 


672 50 


. 49 00 


65 00 


124 00 




45 Somerset . 




74,866 79 


74,866 79 


2,039 96 


6,220 06 


— 


43,919 81 




46 Somerville 




1,515,635 79 


1,515,635 79 


20,570 27 


79,758 25 


10,830 06 


736,275 45 




47 South Hadley 




73,562 64 


73,562 64 


3,999 85 


3,722 64 


161 70 


27,912 58 




48 Southampton 




9,860 49 


9,860 49 


— 


158 75 


270 00 


831 36 




49 Southborough 




21,544 61 


21,544 61 


— 


218 60 


1,112 70 


4,729 54 




50 Southbridge 




, 131,219 45 


131,219 45 


5,794 76 


4,627 38 


5,269 00 


48.731 30 




51 Southwick 




20,761 68 


20,761 68 


— 


458 52 


619 30 


5,034 86 




52 Spencer 




80,888 15 


80,888 15 


7,743 67 


3,517 63 


620 64 


24,136 92 




53 Springfield 




2,533,368 18 


2,533,368 18 


117,318 57 


102,186 06 


— 


1,159,205 52 




54 Sterling l . 




26,640 38 


26,640 38 


466 52 


1,251 95 


2,419 38 


4,535 20 




55 Stockbridge 




26,966 96 


26,966 96 


— 


— 


— 


13,313 72 




56 Stoneham . 




128,688 12 


127,964 12 


8,209 11 


3,811 71 


2,385 86 


40,928 45 




57 Stoughton . 




116,810 15 


116,810 15 


3,091 80 


3,283 87 


1,033 13 


41,986 03 




58 Stow . 




22,345 58 


22,345 58 


— 


1,197 24 


425 00 


5,264 54 




59 Sturbridge 




29,983 42 


29,983 42 


6,499 37 


693 93 


496 00 


7,046 78 




60 Sudbury 




15,698 65 


15,698 65 


— 


959 03 


40 18 


5,423 80, 
2,827 \1 




61 Sunderland 




10,116 44 


10,116 44 


— 


1,492 96 


280 00 




62 Sutton 




51,976 05 


51,223 79 


5,639 45 


1,737 00 


674 00 


22,966 33 




63 Swampscott 




78,103 41 


78,103 41 


— 


1,252 83 


1,836 11 


14,905 78 




64 Swansea 




53,457 76 


53,457 76 


— 


1,234 25 


114 00 


17,561 87 




65 Taunton 




621,377 59 


621,377 59 


21,217 67 


17,326 54 


10,148 12 


214,438 59^ 




66 Templeton 




88,505 75 


88,505 75 


211 20 


1,493 46 


3,091 71 


36,427 98 ; 




67 Tewksbury 




39,617 32 


39,617 32 


— 


1,914 00 


814 57 


13,160 10 




68 Tisbury 




31,865 88 


31,865 88 


— 


1,007 49 


878 25 


7,355 68 j 




69 Tolland 




748 36 


748 36 


— 


— 


— 


49 36 




70 Topsfield . 




11,863 28 


11,863 28 


— 


283 90 


55 32 


1,971 25 




71 Townsend . 




33,895 06 


33,895 06 


2,776 30 


363 52 


197 00 


3,899 85 




72 Truro . 




1,830 89 


1,830 89 


— 


103 00 


— 


— 




73 Tyngsborough 




23,561 98 


23,561 98 


— 


1,091 87 


— 


6,167 m 




74 Tyringham 2 




2,973 63 


2,973 63 


— 


26 20 


— 


— 




75 Upton 




34,201 94 


34,201 94 


2,921 76 


202 00 


— 


2,950 05 




76 Uxbridge . 




87,453 88 


87,453 88 


6,399 85 


1,206 00 


31 50 


43,219 13 





1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



2 Receipts in excess of expenditures. 



III. 159 

'rsons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes — Continued. 



PENDITURES 


Receipts 


Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 


Extraordi- 




Administra- 
tion 


On Account 

of Support or 

Relief in 

Infirmaries 


All 
Other 


nary 

Expenditures 

on Account of 

Institutions 


Aid to 

Dependent 

Children 


Old Age 
Assistance 



41,179 54 


198 00 


2,180 00 


50 15 


792 00 


37,331 56 


892 50 


12,661 60 


686 00 


5,665 15 


78,958 55 


7,508 68 


896 00 


21,562 23 


2,523 69 


47,332 58 


320 00 


1,364 67 


11,150 90 


5,020 59 


840 00 


3,147 88 


1,672 00 


156 00 


77,261 63 


2,801 95 


7,139 50 


5,607 90 


6,175 65 


1,122 00 


1,634 56 


787 52 


901 00 


1,996 84 


3,860 00 


2,900 00 


.54,851 97 


6,697 57 


858 00 


70 00 


12,869 49 


1,469 24 


4,115 01 


.71,908 29 


2,145 02 


395 70 


10,309 10 


7,441 09 


2,125 00 


946 00 


3,229 60 


7,604 92 


3,528 00 


98,281 40 


4,528 75 


4,718 00 


2,716 40 


1,735 00 


1,145 00 


1,776 00 


8,065 07 



110,735 08 

4,302 72 
16,946 12 
21,651 00 

1,864 50 

8,400 31 

4,654 14 
287,106 96 

4,902 46 

9,783 00 
121,849 94 

9,395 46 

5,556 00 
34,396 70 
324,086 38 
76,456 42 
19,682 83 
71,150 85 
16^50 97 
133,242 89 

3,970 34 
10,735 25 
99,665 97 
40,640 89 

4,490 22 
17,572 11 
10,381 69 

6,981 58 

7,949 30 

249,135 85 

39,184 51 

3,671 79 
21,836 61 
67,993 65 

6,180 90 
32,978 44 
15,663 47 
17,597 03 
18,741 47 
14,647 77 

7,688 59 
11,264 86 
25,438 23 

3,886 33 

15,500 00 

464,592 63 

28,290 42 

7,118 21 
14,723 73 
50,775 66 
11,484 85 
39,286 64 
852,870 28 
15,463 90 
12,874 94 
57,815 80 
58,311 46 
12,972 11 
14,684 41 

8.710 92 

4,384 65 
16,448 67 
47,656 58 
29,663 56 
247,760 79 
41,780 19 
18,504 78 
19,695 51 
699 00 

9,227 54 
24,330 19 

1,502 89 
14,860 52 

2,937 43 
26,352 13 
26,300 42 



13,344 72 


3,859 25 


119,784 48 


306,022 85 


217 71 


— 


4,997 78 


2,971 68 


327 74 


444 32 


19,856 84 


8,495 72 


592 00 


— 


20,808 92 


15,404 85 


— 


— 


927 86 


1,619 34 


805 93 


— 


8,954 21 


5,878 75 


117 29 


— 


3,738 44 


4,151 29 


29,080 25 


2,387 68 


315,386 90 


610,290 54 


— 


— 


3,855 31 


1,826 39 


1,211 88 


— 


8,636 10 


5,391 31 


7,819 30 


172 95 


116,643 61 


109,095 82 


233 60 


— 


5,816 11 


5,936 60 


185 86 


— 


4,017 41 


3,967 83 


1,949 99 


— 


29,150 09 


26,526 34 


33,988 63 


— 


380,939 56 


326,120 21 


1,766 17 


313 00 


79,534 55 


47,662 82 


385 00 


— 


16,836 40 


7,699 83 


6,459 27 


— 


83,872 11 


72,118 26 


859 17 


— 


18,348 93 


13,314 81 


15,618 04 


— 


192,059 13 


386,729 76 


125 00 


— 


3,427 45 


3,193 43 


240 00 


— 


11,563 34 


5,177 26 


1,865 77 


1,040 00 


103,945 13 


60,203 91 


1,695 85 


120 50 


33,754 42 


34,138 45 


25 53 


— 


4,348 66 


2,417 76 


667 00 


— 


13,302 30 


12,386 57 


479 62 


— 


4,545 47 


13,727 40 


302 50 


— 


2,976 72 


9,812 22 


160 29 


— 


11,988 76 


4,684 28 


16,291 19 


2,697 48 


323,918 44 


378,888 39 


78 28 


— 


33,525 32 


25,497 21 


500 54 


— 


3,817 37 


1,543 37 


321 90 


— 


18,068 47 


12,258 97 


7,401 21 


158 53 


64,678 76 


60,014 05 


33 00 


— 


3,714 58 


3,089 81 


3,591 06 


— 


28,670 13 


35,415 32 


1,503 30 


— 


21,622 50 


21,285 85 


1,561 24 


— 


19,676 52 


16,041 00 


103 96 


— 


17,984 38 


11,648 20 


131 00 


— 


14,076 42 


7,082 73 


162 42 


— 


6,117 64 


5,830 96 


1,666 75 


— 


11,674 99 


6,619 36 


5,917 07 


— 


27,412 95 


35,114 24 


— 


— 


2,644 38 


2,152 45 


4,286 96 


256 00 


36,579 92 


38,030 87 


48,757 16 


7,189 17 


696,348 65 


812,097 97 


2,777 88 


188 00 


26,388 22 


46,986 42 


624 17 


— 


6,169 54 


3,690 95 


690 04 


— 


9,933 33 


11,611 28 


3,151 86 


— 


59,595 90 


71,623 55 


1,694 91 


— 


9,975 50 


10,786 18 


1,467 64 


3,596 51 


37,964 52 


39,327 12 


129,879 46 


44,123 51 


1,069,247 89 


1,419,996 78 


358 41 


— 


14,763 60 


11,876 78 


382 60 


— 


10,161 78 


16,805 18 


4,504 09 


618 00 


69,483 84 


57,862 28 


1,662 77 


294 64 


71,919 44 


44,596 07 


361 69 


— 


10,878 54 


11,467 04 


562 93 


3,715 04 


15,065 74 


11,202 64 


564 72 


— 


8,064 09 


7,634 56 


185 72 


— 


5,277 21 


4,839 23 


528 74 


2,031 44 


15,138 41 


34,053 94 


4,847 19 


— 


44,208 29 


33,895 12 


1,356 08 


— 


32,239 75 


21,218 01 


12,204 48 


583 21 


240,337 50 


380,456 88 


972 46 


— 


53,026 73 


35,479 02 


505 87 


— 


23,657 45 


15,959 87 


212 55 


— 


19,122 21 


12,743 67 





— 


560 92 


187 44 


325 27 


— 


6,828 68 


5,034 60 


593 20 


633 07 


23,133 88 


10,128 11 


225 00 


— 


453 24 


1,377 65 


297 14 





13,985 83 


9,576 15 


10 00 


— 


3,561 80 


(588 17) 


* 


1,100 79 


21,152 62 


11,948 53 


2,231 91 


36 10 


34,832 76 


52,585 02 



910 27 



724 00 



752 26 



160 


















p.d. i; 


t (A 




Table XII. — Cost to 


Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poo 







CITIES AND 


Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinab 







IN INSTITUTIONS 




Outside 






TOWNS 


Expenditures 
















In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 


Ait 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


De::: 
Chil 


l 


Wakefield . . . $205,401 48 


$205,401 48 


$9,487 21 


$4,170 86 


$3,076 38 


$78,246 62 




2 


Wales 






13,466 85 


13,466 85 


— 


— 


— 


2,282 42 




3 


Walpole 






58,277 02 


58,277 02 


— 


3,707 23 


945 23 


19,641 91 




4 


Waltham 






523,953 51 


523,953 51 


16,614 00 


37,856 14 


— 


161,504 24 




5 


Ware . 






107,540 24 


107,540 24 


4,859 43 


1,058 65 


— 


48,083 84 




6 


Wareham 






128,916 08 


128,916 08 


2,894 61 


5,161 66 


— 


34,394 64 




7 


Warren 1 






46,625 60 


46,625 60 


1,352 20 


2,626 85 


134 42 


12,840 69 




8 


Warwick 






7,366 55 


7,366 55 


— 


398 30 


512 83 


1,546 82 




9 


Washington 




5,667 28 


5,667 28 


363 41 


187 50 


— 


627 10 




10 


Watertown 




364,318 11 


364,318 11 


6,671 20 


15,750 60 


1,025 49 


178,656 63 




11 


Wayland . 




34,343 13 


34,343 13 


11 00 


913 20 


1,232 25 


9,658 69 




12 


Webster 






214,149 86 


214,149 86 


10,350 95 


6,015 19 


5,526 59 


115,239 01 




13 


Wellesley 






54,661 79 


54,661 79 


— 


3,396 39 


2,255 76 


16,897 32 




14 


Wellfleet 






20,983 30 


20,983 30 


268 24 


97 71 


— 


3,228 35 




15 


Wendell 






14,104 71 


14,104 71 


— 


200 00 


361 50 


4,614 70 




16 


Wenham 






10,637 27 


10,637 27 


— 


— 


— 


3,258 72 




17 


West Boylston 1 


27,151 25 


27,151 25 


— 


1,118 IS 


— 


8,648 93 




18 


West Bridgewater 


36,816 51 


36,816 51 


— 


1,930 74 


— 


10,702 82 




19 


West Brookfield 1 


22,313 02 


22,313 02 


312 94 


15 00 


— 


1,885 74 




20 


West Newbury 


31,875 43 


31,875 43 


— 


— 


128 29 


4,034 54 




21 


West Springfield 


188,290 62 


188,290 62 


1,275 00 


5,243 77 


5,428 25 


63,408 37 




22 


West Stockbridge 


16,543 79 


16,543 79 


— 


286 50 


— 


3,020 92 




23 


West Tisbury . 


3,220 54 


3,220 54 


— 


14 75 


— 


702 24 




24 


Westborough 




66,373 71 


66,373 71 


4,591 25 


816 50 


— 


10,616 89 




25 


Westfield . 




214,130 56 


214,130 56 


9,809 38 


8,388 27 


980 50 


73,935 45 




26 


Westford . 




50,547 25 


50,547 25 


6,234 01 


1,168 85 


1,170 00 


15,440 17 




27 


Westhampton 




4,949 58 


4,949 58 


— 


604 90 


— 


139 00 




28 


Westminster 1 




16,761 50 


16,761 50 


625 88 


199 50 


1,064 75 


2,383 12 




29 


Weston 




21,188 52 


21,188 52 


400 26 


840 15 


350 28 


7,277 41 




30 


Westport . 




66,119 76 


66,119 76 


4,110 07 


3,325 69 


80 00 


13,858 84 




31 


Westwood 




17,037 53 


17,037 53 


— 


1,124 90 


597 78 


3,267 58 




32 


Weymouth 




401,314 40 


401,314 40 


6,879 97 


— 


— 


135,401 79 




33 


Whately . 




8,763 81 


8,763 81 


— 


487 71 


1,213 39 


1,418 80 




34 


Whitman . 




135,822 98 


135,822 98 


— 


4,818 46 


4,427 00 


33,764 63 




35 


Wilbraham 




29,903 53 


29,903 53 


— 


823 84 


1,285 98 


12,859 43 




36 


Williamsburg 




26,508 35 


26,508 35 


— 


1,056 08 


— 


4,416 58 




37 


Williamstown 




73,992 05 


73,992 05 


— 


2,217 50 


— 


23,655 77 




38 


Wilmington 




58,820 10 


58,820 10 


677 00 


2,666 11 


320 72 


15,751 60 




39 


Winchendon 




130,612 97 


130,612 97 


9,058 64 


6,056 28 


4,122 23 


53,619 92 




40 


Winchester 




52,653 53 


52,653 53 


502 00 


2,749 16 


1,435 43 


11,051 82 




41 


Windsor 




6,417 24 


6,417 24 


— 


532 49 


— 


1,687 71 




42 


Winthrop . 




134,916 85 


134,916 85 


— 


6,127 43 


1,642 85 


36,695 26 




43 


Woburn 




208,286 46 


208,286 46 


5,762 43 


3,714 21 


— 


57,812 03 




44 


Worcester 




3,642,982 22 


3,627,528 94 


152,541 27 


5,226 99 


65,957 85 


2.078,479 87 




45 


Worthington 




8,486 30 


8,486 30 


— 


390 00 


— 


498 81 




46 


Wrentham 




27,327 27 


27,327 27 


— 


259 78 


— 


8,260 13 




47 


Yarmouth . 




51,972 94 


51,972 94 


— 


3,168 94 


1,977 43 


17,396 52 






Totals . 


$64,785,970 38 


$64,741,305 14 


$2,480,429 04 


$1,544,596 71 


$793,171 30 $25,182,973 72j 


i : : 












1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 









Table XIII. — Net Cost to the State of Supporting and Relieving Poor Persons 
in Institutions and in Families 



Aggregate . 

Ordinary expenditures 

In institutions $984,197 25 

State Infirmary $841,021 96 

State Farm 368 11 

Massachusetts Hospital School 142,807 18 

Total, outside institutions . . ■.-.•.• • • • 19,263,148 76 
Extraordinary expenditures on account of institutions 



$20,328,451 31 
20,247,346 01 



81,105 30 



Tabi 



III. 

?rsons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes — Concluded. 



161 



PENDITURES 



Aid to 

Dependent 

Children 



Old Age 
Assistance 



Administra- 
tion 



Receipts 



On Account 

of Support or 

Relief in 

Infirmaries 



All 
Other 



Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 



Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 
Institutions 



16,239 56 


89,082 80 


5,098 05 


1,161 66 


82,328 59 


121,911 23 


466 50 


10,587 93 


130 00 


— 


7,600 63 


5,866 22 


5,443 97 


27,161 94 


1,376 74 


— 


28,886 04 


29,390 98 


49,065 82 


246,491 32 


12,421 99 


723 43 


302,347 84 


220,882 24 


10,774 94 


40,639 58 


2,123 80 


105 50 


37,764 20 


69,670 54 


13,0S9 59 


71,545 24 


1,830 34 


84 55 


76,019 19 


52,812 34 


4,080 80 


24,090 64 


1,500 00 


— 


22,862 57 


23,763 03 


— 


4,845 26 


63 34 


— 


5,383 58 


1,982 97 


— 


3,917 05 


572 22 


— 


3,038 32 


2,628 96 


48,586 63 


101,441 66 


12,185 90 


125 44 


161,729 68 


202,462 99 


900 25 


20,548 28 


1,079 46 


— 


16,443 03 


17,900 10 


16,418 35 


55,213 67 


5,386 10 


1,269 99 


81,598 15 


131,281 72 


5,464 73 


26,300 96 


346 63 


— 


26,292 59 


28,369 20 


2,477 00 


14,812 00 


100 00 


— 


11,854 23 


9,129 07 


— 


8,627 76 


300 75 


— 


9,868 65 


4,236 06 


209 00 


7,027 95 


141 60 


— 


6,148 31 


4,488 96 


959 35 


■15,302 74 


1,122 08 


— 


15,497 35 


11,653 90 


703 47 


22,200 45 


1,279 03 


— 


25,395 70 


11,420 81 


1,208 73 


18,487 33 


403 28 


— 


16,830 24 


5,482 78 


1,060 00 


25,960 92 


691 68 


— 


22,311 81 


9,563 62 


10,421 01 


84,963 33 


17,550 89 


— 


88,335 05 


99,955 57 


. 1,085 50 


11,979 27 


171 60 


— 


9,527 02 


7,016 77 


— 


2,503 55 


— 


— 


2,284 77 


935 77 


4,570 83 


44,461 52 


1,316 72 


125 74 


39,724 91 


26,523 06 


16,993 13 


95,265 47 


8,758 36 


265 07 


86,544 12 


127,321 37 


3,933 35 


21,534 57 


1,066 30 


3,319 15 


22,127 02 


25,101 08 


— 


4,205 68 


— 


— 


3,597 11 


1,352 47 


990 00 


11,212 51 


285 74 


— 


11,876 27 


4,885 23 


1,088 14 


9,444 06 


1,788 22 


— 


10,325 95 


10,862 57 


3,553 18 


38,741 58 


2,450 40 


288 50 


36,542 98 


29,288 28 


1,399 68 


10,331 80 


315 79 


— 


8,513 22 


8,524 31 


47,575 34 


200,579 28 


10,878 02 


136 54 


218,487 15 


182,690 71 


720 00 


4,774 30 


149 61 


— 


4,011 75 


4,752 06 


11,824 23 


78,773 57 


2,215 09 


— 


83,940 86 


51,882 12 


612 52 


13.301 76 


1,020 00 


— 


11,531 77 


18,371 76 


1,218 00 


19,717 69 


100 00 


— 


16,296 16 


10,212 19 


7,570 06 


37,731 21 


2,817 51 


— 


38,104 37 


35,887 68 


6,092 24 


32,166 62 


1,145 81 


— 


34,516 35 


24,303 75 


3,995 50 


49,822 70 


3,937 65 


931 54 


55,139 71 


74,541 72 


6,728 71 


26,104 77 


4,081 64 


— 


27,462 81 


25,190 72 


— 


4,157 04 


40 00 


— 


3,896 76 


2,520 48 


5,628 50 


77,117 17 


7,705 64 


— 


78,508 38 


56,408 47 


30,970 68 


100,142 56 


9,884 55 


298 56 


119,521 87 


88,466 03 


238,258 40 


909,762 20 


177,302 36 


10,114 72 


1,254,921 72 


2,362,492 50 


244 50 


7,322 20 


30 79 


— 


5,682 50 


2,803 80 


994 15 


16,932 05 


881 16 


— 


17,162 91 


10,164 36 


4,661 76 


21,632 62 


3,135 67 


— 


24,858 48 


27,114 46 



15,453 28 



$25,326,735 27 $2,884,849 46 $226,480 32 $29,346,334 98 $35,168,489 



$44,665 24 



Table XIV. — Total Net Cost of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts during 
the year ending March 31, 1939. 

Cities and 

Source of Relief Towns State Total 

Aggregate . $35,213,743 25 $20,328,451 31 $55,542,194 56 

Ordinary Expenditures: 

Total 35,169,078 01 20,247,346 01 55,416,424 02 

In institutions 3,705,332 01 984,197 25 4,689,529 26 

Outside 28,578,896 54 19,263,148 761 47,842,045 30 

Public Welfare Administration . . . 2,884,849 46 2,884,849 46 
Extraordinary Expenditures on account of 

institutions . 44,665 24 81,105 30 125,770 54 

1 Includes Federal Grants for Old Age Assistance— $11,957,631.39. 

State Reimbursement for Old Age Assistance, $8,877,199.51 not included in this table. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Adoption of Wards ................. 33 

Adoptions, Investigation of ............. 36 

Adult poor provided for in families, The settled ......... 47 

Advisory Board ................. 1 

Aid and Relief, Division of . . . . . . . ... . . . . •' 9 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance .......'..... 14 

Subdivision of Aid to Dependent Children . . . . . . . . . . 12 

Subdivision of Research and Statistics .......... 23 

Subdivision of Relief ............... 10 

Subdivision of Settlements ............. 9 

Subdivision of Social Service .............. 16 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses ...... 12 

Aid to Dependent Children, Subdivision of . . . . . . . . . . 12 

Appeals — Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children . . . . . . . 14, 21 

Audit 11 

Boarding homes for aged persons, Licensed ........... 28 

Boarding homes for infants, Licensed . . . . . . . ... . .34 

Bridgewater, State Farm, Infirmary Department ......... 41 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance ............. 9 

Burials 11 

Canton, Massachusetts Hospital School . . . . ... . . . . 41 

Charitable Corporations, Private ............. 62 

Child Guardianship, Division of ............ 28 

Adoptions of wards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 

Boarding homes, Summary of infants under two years of age reported in . . . . 34 

Children in care and custody of . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 

Children in custody during, Summary of all . . . . . . . . : 29 

Children under two years of age, Summary of ......... 34 

Dependent Children .............. 32 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children . . . . 31 

Disposition by the courts of neglected children . . . .' . . . . . 30 

Disposition of children held on temporary mittimi . . . . ... . . 32 

Investigation of adoptions ............. 36 

Licensed boarding homes for infants ........... 34 

Licensed maternity hospitals . . . . . . . . ... . 36 

Status of children 29 

Child Welfare Services . . . . 38 

Children with settlement provided for in infirmaries . . . . . . . . . 48 

Children with settlement provided for outside of infirmaries ....... 47 

City and Town infirmaries, The . . . . . . . . . . . ,134 

See Infirmaries, The city and town. 

Cities and towns,. Penalty incurred for failure to make returns ....... 48 

Commissioner of Public Welfare, Report of ......... 2 

County Training Schools, The .............. 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence . . . . . . . . ... 46 

Hampden County Training School, Springfield 46 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford ....... 46 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale ......... 46 

Crippled children, Social service for ............ 38 

Dangerous diseases . . . . . . . . . • • • • ... 11 

Delinquent and wayward children, Disposition by the courts of cases of . . . . . 31 

Department of Public Welfare .............. 

Advisory Board . .... v ......... • 1 

Divisions of ...... \ ....:.... 1 

Principal duties of ............. • 8 

Report of the Commissioner . . . . . ... . . . . . ' . 2 

Department's^ finances, The ...'.......... 60 

Dependent minor children: 

Provided for in infirmaries ............. 48 

Provided for outside of infirmaries ............ 47 

Division of Aid and Relief ............. 

See Aid and Relief, Division of. 

Division of Child Guardianship. _ 

See Child Guardianship, Division of. 

Division of Juvenile Training . . . . . . . . . . . . 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Divisions of the Department ............. 1 

Duties of the Department .............. 8 

Finances, The Department's .............. 60 

Hospital School at Canton, Massachusetts 41 

Hospitals, Licensed maternity . . . . ... . . . . • • 36 

Housing, State Board of .40 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley ............ 42 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster 42 

Infants, Licensed boarding homes for ........... 34 

Infants under two years of age, Summary of boarding homes for ...... 34 



\ 



Pt. I. 163 

PAGE 

Infirmary department at State Farm, Bridgewater . . . . . . . . 41 

l Infirmaries, Dependent minor children with settlement provided for in ..... 48 

i Infirmaries, The city and town 134 

Infirmaries closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 

Inspection of ............... 134 

Laws relating to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134. 

Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13^f 

Reports from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 

Institutions, Supervision of . . . . . . . . . . . .1,41,42 

Capacity, population and inventory ........... 42 

Expenditures ............... 43 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley .42 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster . . . . . . . . . . 42 

Infirmary Department of State Farm, Bridgewater ........ 41 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough .......... 41 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton . . . . . . . . . . 41 

Payroll 45 

Per capita cost ............... 45 

Receipts . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . 43 

State Hospital and Infirmary, Tewksbury .......... 41 

i Investigation of Adoptions .............. 36 

Juvenile Training, Division of . . ... . . . . . . . . 41 

Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls .......... 42 

Laws of 1939 affecting the Department ........... 49 

Licensed boarding homes for aged persons ........... 28 

Licensed boarding homes for infants . . . ... . . . . . . 34 

[Licensed maternity hospitals . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . 36 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough ........... 41 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton . . . . . • . . . . . . 41 

Massachusetts Training Schools ............. 41 

Maternity hospitals, Licensed ............. 36 

Neglected Children, Disposition of, by the courts . . . . . . . . . 30 

'Old Age Assistance ............... 14 

Appeals, Subdivision of . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 21 

Statistics , 14 

! Physical Handicaps, Children with ............ 38 

! Poor relief, Penalty for failure to make returns of . . . . . . . . . 48 

iPoor relief, Statistics of . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 

Private charitable corporations ............. 62 

Annual reports of .............. 63 

Endorsement of ............... 64 

Investigation of, seeking incorporation .......... 62 

Number and classification of ............ 63 

Summary of statistical returns ............ 66 

Supervision of ............... 63 

'Research and Statistics, Bureau of ............ 23 

Relief, Subdivision of . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . 10 

Audit 11 

Burials ................ 11 

Dangerous diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H 

Removals ................ 12 

Shipwrecked seamen .............. io 

Sick state poor ............... 10 

Temporary aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Vocational education .............. 11 

^Removals of poor persons .............. 12 

[Report of the Commissioner of Public Welfare .......... 2 

Settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns. Supervision of ..... 47 

Dependent minor children in infirmaries .......... 48 

Dependent minor children outside of infirmaries . . . . . . . . . 47 

Penalty for failure to make returns ........... 48 

Settled adult poor provided for in families . . . . . . . . . 47 

SSettlements, Subdivision of 9 

^Shipwrecked Seamen ............... 10 

SShirley, Industrial School for Boys . . . ' . . . . . . ... . 42 

Sick state poor . . . . . . . . . . . .' . . . . 10 

Social service for crippled children ............ 38 

Social Service, Subdivision of ............. 16 

Children 18 

Men 16 

Office applications . .20 

Placement and Supervision 19 

Students in training .............. 21 

Summary 21 

Women . . ' . . . . . . . . . ) . . . . 17 

State Board of Housing 40 

State Farm, Bridgewater, Infirmary department at 41 

State Hospital and Infirmary, Tewksbury 41 



164 P.D. 17. 

PAGE 

Statistics of poor relief 140 

Cost 142 

Numbers relieved 140 

Subdivision of Aid to Dependent Children ........... 12 

Subdivision of Relief ............... 10 

Subdivision of Settlements .............. 9 

Subdivision of Social Service ............. 16 

Supervision of institutions .............. 42 

Supervision of settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns . . . . . . 47 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses . . . . . . . . 12 

Temporary aid ................ 10 

Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary ........... 41 

Training Schools. County .............. 46 

Training Schools. Massachusetts ............. 41 

Trustees, Massachusetts Hospital School ........... 41 

Trustees. Massachusetts Training Schools ........... 41 

Trustees, State Hospital and Infirmary ........... 41 

Vocational education ............... n 

Wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses. Supervision of . . . . . . 12 

Westborough, Lyman School for Boys ........... 41 



\ 



I 



Caylord Bros. 

/Makers 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



.1 I 

i 

i